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Apr 8, 2012

ICE Futures U.S.: The Weekly Analysis of US Equity and Currency Markets Is on Holiday


Nick McDonald of Trade With Precision returns next week with concise technical analysis of these markets for the week ahead, using the Russell 2000® index and the ICE US Dollar Index® as pivotal focuses. The weekly outlooks are regularly available every Sunday evening by 8 p.m. ET. You can visit icecommentary.com at your convenience—the weekly video commentaries remain on the website until new commentaries are posted.

NYT Afternoon Update: Deal Reached on Contested Afghan Night Raids | Global Update |Top News

The New York Times International Herald Tribune
April 8, 2012
Compiled 20:45 GMT

Global Update


 

Longtime Correspondent Mike Wallace Dead at 93, CBS News Reports: NYT Breaking News:




Breaking News 
The New York Times
Sunday, April 8, 2012 -- 10:40 AM EDT
-----

Longtime Correspondent Mike Wallace Dead at 93, CBS News Reports

Mike Wallace, a pioneer of American broadcasting who confronted leaders and liars for the newsmagazine “60 Minutes” for four decades, has died, CBS News said. He was 93.

His death was announced on CBS by the anchor of its Sunday morning program, Charles Osgood. The network did not immediately specify when or where he died. Mr. Wallace had been ill for several years.

As one of the original correspondents and hosts of “60 Minutes,” which was started in 1968, Mr. Wallace helped to establish the television newsmagazine format. “60 Minutes” is now the most popular such program on American television.

An earlier version of this news alert incorrectly stated that Mr. Wallace was 94.

Read More:
http://mediadecoder.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/04/08/mike-wallace-60-minutes-pioneer-dies/?emc=na

Intelligence surge boosts U.S. confidence on Iran’s nuclear program : Today's Highlights: The Washington Post | Today's Headlines

The Washington Post

TODAY'S HEADLINES

TODAY'S HIGHLIGHTS
NATION 
Intelligence surge boosts U.S. confidence on Iran’s nuclear program 
Hundreds of missions by stealth drones have filled in blanks on Iran’s nuclear program, giving U.S. officials unprecedented insight into Iran’s nuclear efforts. 
( by Joby Warrick and Greg Miller , The Washington Post) 

‘Stand Your Ground’ laws coincide with jump in justifiable-homicide cases 
This sharp turn in American self-defense law began in Florida in 2005 and has spread to more than 30 other states. 
( by Marc Fisher and Dan Eggen , The Washington Post) 

More National: Breaking National News & Headlines - Washington Post 


METRO 
Ursula Mattheisen, conservation activist 
The Falls Church homemaker volunteered with and supported conservation groups, receiving an award from the Izaak Walton League. 
(, The Washington Post) 

Metro riders may face smaller fare hike 
The transit authority says projections of higher ridership — and more revenue — will help cut down an expected deficit in its next budget. 
( by Dana Hedgpeth , The Washington Post) 

Warnings of frost — and fire — issued 
Dry winds and warm temperatures trigger “Red Flag” warnings of fire, meanwhile outer counties receive overnight-frost warnings. 
( by Martin Weil , The Washington Post) 

The Washingtonians aboard the Titanic 
Amid the commemorations for the 100th anniversary of the tragedy at sea, there are also poignant stories to be told of several Washington-area residents. 
( by Michael E. Ruane , The Washington Post) 

Protesters march again for Martin 
For a second rally in two weeks, protesters gathered in Washington to pull on hoodies and demand justice in the slaying of Florida teenager Travyon Martin. 
( by Emma Brown , The Washington Post) 

More Post Local: Washington, DC Area News, Traffic, Weather, Sports & More - The Washington Post 


POLITICS 
Md. poised to approve retroactive tax hike 
Facing a Monday deadline to adjourn and a $1 billion budget gap, Maryland lawmakers cobbled together a compromise tax package Saturday that would apply retroactively. 
( by Aaron C. Davis, John Wagner and Greg Masters , The Washington Post) 

Gingrich’s new mission: reining in Romney 
Onetime House speaker Newt Gingrich, who has almost no chance of winning the GOP nomination, sounds like a man leading a cause rather than a campaign. His mission: ensuring Mitt Romney runs as a conservative, rather than heading back to the center. 
( by Karen Tumulty , The Washington Post) 

GSA conference attendees motivated by $3,200 mentalist 
A mind reader’s act for federal employees has become a symbol of a major spending scandal. 
( by Lisa Rein , The Washington Post) 

Wisconsin recall moves to center stage 
The recall election aimed at ousting Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker will be nasty, costly and consequential. 
( by Dan Balz , The Washington Post) 

More Post Politics: Breaking Politics News, Political Analysis & More - The Washington Post 


STYLE 
Daughter celebrates a new house, and parents aren’t invited 
Don’t overreact, Carolyn Hax says: Sometimes adult children just want to socialize without Mom and Dad. 
(, The Washington Post) 

Miss Manners: Personal contacts beat Internet for dating prospects 
A divorcee in her 60s is looking for a relationship and wonders if there’s a polite way to state upfront that she’s not looking for anyone with debt, a criminal history, or other baggage. 
(, The Washington Post) 

This week’s best travel bargains 
Savings on a Vermont resort, a Serengeti safari, hipster hotels, Caribbean cruises and more. 
(, The Washington Post) 

More Style: Culture, Arts, Ideas & More - The Washington Post 


SPORTS 
TV and radio listings: April 8 

(, The Washington Post) 

Orioles win second straight 
Another strong performance from its starting pitcher, this time Tommy Hunter, nets Baltimore another victory against Minnesota. 
( by Dan Connolly , The Washington Post) 

United struggles to scoreless tie 
United’s attack returns to its sputtering ways as the club is shut out for the third time in five games this season in a 0-0 tie with the visiting Seattle Sounders. 
( by Paul Tenorio , The Washington Post) 

Under bright lights, a winning performance 
Braden Holtby, in the biggest start of his brief NHL career, is occasionally spectacular in making 35 saves to help the Capitals leapfrog Ottawa for the seventh seed in the Eastern Conference playoffs. 
( by Tarik El-Bashir , The Washington Post) 

OPINION | This pair should have final say 
OPINION | If anything, Peter Hanson and Phil Mickelson have boosted each other’s confidence. They will get the chance to play off one another in the final round Sunday. 
(, The Washington Post) 

More Sports: Sports News, Scores, Analysis, Schedules & More - The Washington Post 


WORLD 
India, Pakistan leaders pledge improved relations 
Pakistani President Zardari’s visit to India’s leaders was freighted with much diplomatic significance. 
( by Rama Lakshmi and Richard Leiby , The Washington Post) 

Intelligence surge boosts U.S. confidence on Iran’s nuclear program 
Hundreds of missions by stealth drones have filled in blanks on Iran’s nuclear program, giving U.S. officials unprecedented insight into Iran’s nuclear efforts. 
( by Joby Warrick and Greg Miller , The Washington Post) 

For Japan, a surge in oil and gas imports 
Japan once hoped nuclear plants would power half the country’s needs. Then came Fukushima. Now Japan is on a frenzied but costly hunt for fossil fuels to avoid the short-term crisis of power outages and darkened cities. 
( by Chico Harlan , The Washington Post) 

Citizenship rule roils Egyptian race 
Law widely seen as originating in bid to block a revolutionary favorite now haunts an ultra-conservative. 
( by Leila Fadel , The Washington Post) 

Mubarak loyalist to run for president 
Omar Suleiman’s surprise move offers Egyptians clearest choice yet between old order and new. 
( by Ernesto Londoño , The Washington Post) 

More World: World News, International News, Foreign Reporting - The Washington Post 


LIVE DISCUSSIONS 
Talk about Travel: Kayaking the Everglades, lost and found, hip Atlanta and more 
The Post's travel writers and editors discuss your travel stories, questions, gripes and more. 
(, vForum) 

More Conversations: Discussions, Blogs, Debates, Live Q&A's and More - The Washington Post 


TECHNOLOGY 
Is Apple testing a mini-iPad? 
We’ve already seen our fair share of rumors regarding a smaller iPad (our own sources pointed to Apple buying 7-inch screens), but now Apple’s biggest fan John Gruber is saying that the company is testing smaller 7.85-inch iPads in its labs. 
( by Devindra Hardawar | VentureBeat.com , VentureBeat.com) 

More Technology News - The Washington Post 


EDITORIAL 
A disappointing opening to the 2012 general election campaign 
Is this the best Obama and Romney can do? 
(, The Washington Post) 

Two Islamist paths 
Tunisia offers a more promising model than Egypt does. 
(, The Washington Post) 

Easter: A day of renewal 
Believers are joined by skeptics, nonbelievers and followers of other faiths. 
(, The Washington Post) 

The right to disagree — or not? 

(, The Washington Post) 



(, The Washington Post) 

More Opinions: Washington Post Opinion, Editorial, Op Ed, Politics Editorials - The Washington Post 


BUSINESS 
Nokia U.S. Future at Risk 
Nokia Oyj is seeking to revive its U.S. business with a smartphone release this weekend that may determine the company’s future. Initial sales will probably trail competitors’ recent debuts, hurting the company’s chances. 
( by Scott Moritz and Diana ben-Aaron Bloomberg News , Bloomberg) 

The man in Big Oil’s bully pulpit 
Jack Gerard, president of the American Petroleum Institute, is no shrinking violet when it comes to his defense of Big Oil, and his opposition to the president’s policies. 
( by Steven Mufson , The Washington Post) 

Costly tax advances are disappearing 
The era of the tax advance is over, the final chapter in a case study of how businesses can reap billions of dollars from the unintended consequences of government policies. 
( by Ylan Q. Mui , The Washington Post) 

Las Vegas Meeting’s Cost Prompts Lawmaker Review of Agency 
House Republicans said they will hold a hearing on spending by the U.S. General Services Administration after the agency’s chief resigned because of a conference at a Las Vegas area resort that cost $823,000. 
( by Tony Capaccio Bloomberg News , Bloomberg) 

Is Apple testing a mini-iPad? 
We’ve already seen our fair share of rumors regarding a smaller iPad (our own sources pointed to Apple buying 7-inch screens), but now Apple’s biggest fan John Gruber is saying that the company is testing smaller 7.85-inch iPads in its labs. 
( by Devindra Hardawar | VentureBeat.com , VentureBeat.com) 

More Business News, Financial News, Business Headlines & Analysis - The Washington Post 

Welfare Limits Left Poor Adrift as Recession Hit: NYT Today's Headlines:







TOP NEWS

Welfare Limits Left Poor Adrift as Recession Hit

By JASON DePARLE
In Arizona and other states, some recipients of the Clinton-era Temporary Assistance for Needy Families have taken desperate measures to make ends meet.

China Buys Inroads in the Caribbean, Catching U.S. Notice

By RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD
China's economic might has rolled up to America's doorstep, with loans from state banks, investments by companies and outright gifts from the government.

U.S. Defines Its Demands for New Round of Talks With Iran

By DAVID E. SANGER and STEVEN ERLANGER
The Obama administration and its allies plan to call for the immediate closing and ultimate dismantling of a recently completed nuclear facility, American and European diplomats say.
QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"I know there are some people who abuse the system. But I was willing to do anything they asked me to. If I could, I'd still be working for those two dollars an hour."
TAMIKA SHELBY, whose welfare benefits have been cut as restrictions have grown

ARTS

INTERACTIVE FEATURE:Connecting Music and Gesture

Alan Gilbert, music director of the New York Philharmonic, demonstrates and discusses the role of a conductor.
OPINION

A Man. A Woman. Just Friends?

We're just friends. No, really.
WORLD

Tuna Again? In Fault-Finding Britain, It's a Cause for Divorce

By SARAH LYALL
Excessive servings of tuna casserole is just one example of marital distress from the divorce dockets of Britain, which does not have no-fault divorce.

China Said to Detain Returning Tibetan Pilgrims

By EDWARD WONG
The detainees are being interrogated and ordered to denounce the Dalai Lama, according to groups who have conducted interviews with family members.

At the End of the Earth, Seeking Clues to the Universe

By SIMON ROMERO
High in the Chilean desert, scientists have installed one of the world's largest ground-based astronomical projects to look for clues to the origins of the universe.
U.S.

Police Suspect Single Gunman in Attacks in Oklahoma

By CHANNING JOSEPH and MATT FLEGENHEIMER
All five victims in the Tulsa, Okla. shootings were African-Americans. Witnesses said the shooter was a white man in a pickup truck.

In Chicago, the Boys (and Girls) of Winter

By MONICA DAVEY
Hockey is popular among adults in Chicago, where new students in their middle years hold so many games that some have to play past midnight.

Packing Up, Moving On and Selling the Town

By DAN FROSCH
Buford, Wyo., which has billed itself as the nation's smallest town, was auctioned off by its sole resident on Thursday.
POLITICS

A Friendship Dating to 1976 Resonates in 2012

By MICHAEL BARBARO
The friendship between Mitt Romney and Benjamin Netanyahu, little known to outsiders, is now rich with political intrigue.
BUSINESS

In Executive Pay, a Rich Game of Thrones

By NATASHA SINGER
Although the growth in C.E.O. compensation slowed last year, the pay numbers are still eye-popping.

Spam Invades a Last Refuge, the Cellphone

By NICOLE PERLROTH
Cellphone customers received roughly 4.5 billion spam texts last year, twice as many as in 2009, and remedies to the growing menace are few.
BITS

Taking a Chance on Love, and Algorithms

By JENNA WORTHAM
Online dating sites defend the usefulness of their scientific approach. But a social psychology professor says that "technology is not the way to figure out who is compatible and will never be."
TECHNOLOGY
THE HAGGLER

To Stop Cellphone Cramming, Don't Let It Start

By DAVID SEGAL
The Haggler revisits the subject of cramming - the act of tacking on an unrequested service fee to a phone bill. Why, he asks, can't cellphone carriers do more to thwart it?
FUNDAMENTALLY

Another Rally, but a New Cast of Characters

By PAUL J. LIM
The rising market in the first quarter was built on technology and consumer stocks, not the safe, income-producing shares that led it higher at the start of 2011.
NOVELTIES

What 23 Years of E-Mail May Say About You

By ANNE EISENBERG
Researchers using themselves as guinea pigs have analyzed huge amounts of their personal data, seeking meaningful and useful patterns.
SPORTS
RAYS 8, YANKEES 6

Yanks' Rally Can't Offset Kuroda's Shaky Start

By DAVID WALDSTEIN
In his first start as a Yankee, Hiroki Kuroda struggled to locate his pitches as he allowed four earned runs in five and two-thirds innings.
METS 4, BRAVES 2

Wright and Duda Power Mets Past Braves

By ANDREW KEH
David Wright homered in the first inning and Lucas Duda hit two more as the Mets' offense came to life in the victory.

Lundqvist Focused on the Cup

By BEN SHPIGEL
Henrik Lundqvist, three times named the top goalie in his native Sweden, has made himself a leading candidate for the same honor in the N.H.L. with the Rangers.
ARTS

The Maestro's Mojo

By DANIEL J. WAKIN
Demystifying the movements of conductors, with the help of seven top practitioners, including Alan Gilbert, music director of the New York Philharmonic.

A Radical Female Hero From Dystopia

By A. O. SCOTT and MANOHLA DARGIS
The critics Manohla Dargis and A. O. Scott examine the complex, at times contradictory character of Katniss Everdeen, the hero of "The Hunger Games."

Ferris Bueller's Nights Onstage

By CHARLES McGRATH
Matthew Broderick returns to Broadway and dons dancing shoes for the musical "Nice Work if You Can Get It."
NEW YORK / REGION

Giuseppi Logan's Second Chance

By JOHN LELAND
For more than 30 years after some pioneering albums, Giuseppi Logan was one of jazz's missing persons, impaired by drugs and mental illness.

Parish Without Borders

By EMILY BRENNAN
In Downtown Brooklyn is the Oratory Church of St. Boniface, an intentional parish, which attracts congregants from beyond local boundaries.
CHARACTER STUDY

In Queens, Redefining 'Mechanic'

By COREY KILGANNON
Pasiana Rodriguez, co-owner of a radiator and repair shop in the gritty Willets Point section of Queens, thrives in a male-dominated environment and stays her "girlie girl" self.
MAGAZINE

Just One More Game ...

By SAM ANDERSON
How time-wasting video games escaped the arcade, jumped into our pockets and took over our lives.

Can Coffee Kick-Start an Economy?

By DANIEL BERGNER
The chief executive of Good African Coffee in Kasese, Uganda, is trying an entrepreneurial experiment.
IT'S THE ECONOMY

What's the Easiest Way to Cheat on Your Taxes?

By ADAM DAVIDSON, JACOB GOLDSTEIN, CAITLIN KENNEY, and DAN KEDMEY
And eight other important questions you always wanted to ask an accountant.
EDITORIALS
EDITORIAL

The Road We Need Not Have Traveled

A military tribunal at the Guantánamo Bay detention camp is the wrong system, and the wrong place, to try the mastermind of the 9/11 attacks.
EDITORIAL | DECONSTRUCTION

Still Crawling Out of a Very Deep Hole

By TERESA TRITCH
The latest jobs report is just one more reason for Americans to wonder if this recovery will ever lead to broad prosperity.
EDITORIAL

Disclosure to Student Borrowers

The Senate introduced a sensible bill that would require lenders and colleges to educate students about their borrowing options. This measure deserves to become law.
SUNDAY REVIEW
OP-ED COLUMNIST

What Would Jesus Do at the Masters?

By MAUREEN DOWD
Men in green jackets. Men in black robes, men in white thobes - grow up and make room!
OP-ED COLUMNIST

The Other Arab Spring

By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
Environmental pressures, not just political and economic ones, stirred change in the Mideast.
OP-ED COLUMNIST

Learning to Respect Religion

By NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF
Easter is the perfect day to reflect on the new intellectual tide that expresses grudging admiration for religion as a cohesive force. (Also, teens, I'm holding an essay contest on bullying.)
ON THIS DAY
On April 8, 1973, artist Pablo Picasso died at his home near Mougins, France, at age 91.