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Mar 10, 2012

GATA | THE GATA DISPATCHES: Gold not just defends liberty but reality / The FED gets creative - A. Macleod / Interviews to Sinclair and a gold dealer

Gold now defends not just liberty but simple reality

2:57p ET Saturday, March 10, 2012
Dear Friend of GATA and Gold:
GATA can't vouch for the data published in the latest edition of Alan M. Newman's financial letter, Crosscurrents, which argues that financial manipulation has become the main pursuit of the United States economy, but he is far from alone in his observations. Commentary about this trend arose around 20 years ago, perhaps first in The New Republic magazine. And there is a well-established entry about it at Wikipedia, the Internet encyclopedia, here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Financialization

Newman writes that dollar trading volume (presumably in U.S. markets) now is more than four times larger than the U.S. gross domestic product as well as four times larger than total stock market capitalization. "The churn continues at the most ferocious pace, making a mockery of our capital markets," Newman writes. "The theme of investing for the future is now meaningless as high-frequency trading distorts price discovery, resulting in gross pricing inefficiencies."



This echoes what GATA board member Adrian Douglas, publisher of the Market Force Analysis letter (www.MarketForceAnalysis.com), often has written about the gold and silver markets particularly -- that paper trading is scores of times greater the actual metal traded and, perhaps more important, scores of times greater than actual metal available for delivery. This means, as you've heard from this quarter before, that there are no markets anymore, just interventions (http://www.gata.org/node/6242), with the virtually infinite amounts of money necessary for manipulation being delivered by central banks to the monster financial houses that act as their agents both officially and openly as well as unofficially and surreptitiously.
And yet we too may be faulted for paying such close attention to it. Yes, these manipulations supply the main cues for all asset and consumer prices, but now that "trillion" has become a commonly accepted term, the economy's connection to reality itself is being lost. For as Zimbabwe discovered recently and as Weimar Germany discovered 90 years ago, when it comes to human affairs, "trillion" exists only in the imagination, if there. It is incomprehensible.

The digits that flash on our computer screens every day are now mostly just the reflections of holograms concocted by machines. These machines may not yet have taken over the world in the much-feared moment of "singularity," catapulting us all into the losing side of some Arnold Schwarzenegger movie, but as Newman notes they could turn on their masters at any time.
You know all the old philosophical arguments in favor of gold and silver as an independent form of money -- human liberty, limited government, and so forth. But an equally compelling argument now may be the defense of simple reality. In the end monetary metal in your hand is at least something. Hurl it hard enough at an arrogant central banker, a parasitic fund manager, or a sleeping market regulator and it would sting a bit. However the precious metals are to be priced, holding them as money is a way of rejecting and defying the holograms and the creators of infinite money.
Having had plenty of horrible experience with infinite money, the American Founders knew all this and so insisted on commodity money. But their descendants lacked such experience, and so it came to seem primitive to let the money supply be determined by how much metal could be pried out of the ground each year. Indeed, it is primitive. It just has turned out that more sophisticated money becomes, perhaps inevitably, too sophisticated, and the result is far worse than primitive -- predatory, corrupt, totalitarian, and unreal.
Alan Newman's letter, headlined "A Mockery of the Capital Markets," is posted at the Crosscurrents Internet site here:

http://www.cross-currents.net/charts.htm


Alasdair Macleod: The Fed gets creative

1:45p ET Saturday, March 10, 2012

Economist and former banker Alasdair Macleod takes a look at the Federal Reserve's latest trial balloon and figures that the objective is to use bank credit rather than more "quantitative easing" to engender inflation. Macleod's commentary is headlined "The Fed Gets Creative" and it's posted at GoldMoney's Internet site here:

http://www.goldmoney.com/gold-research/alasdair-macleod/the-fed-gets-cre...

NYT Global Update: No Talks With Syria Opposition, Assad Tells U.N. Envoy

Global Update


TOP NEWS

No Talks With Syria Opposition, Assad Tells U.N. Envoy

By KAREEM FAHIM
Diplomatic efforts to stop fighting in Syria foundered as President Bashar al-Assad shut the door on any immediate negotiations and escalated a new assault on the city of Idlib.

Moscow's Winter of Dissent Faces Reality of Putin's Win

By DAVID M. HERSZENHORN and ELLEN BARRY
As protesters gathered once more in Moscow, their movement collided with its own limitations and Vladimir V. Putin's decisive victory in Russia's presidential vote.

German Leader and I.M.F. Chief Split Over Debt

By NICHOLAS KULISH and ANNIE LOWREY
Despite their friendship, Angela Merkel and Christine Lagarde face difficult discussions over how to handle a future crisis, with opposing stances on the amount of money needed to protect vulnerable economies and how it should be raised.
World

Interactive Feature: In the Wake of Disaster

A year after the tsunami, communities are still grappling with how to assess the risk of radiation exposure.
Opinion

Latitude

Tribe and Prejudice

By HUMA YUSUF
Violence against Pakistan's religious minorities is rising, yet the politicians have no plans to stop it.
WORLD

Japan Finds Story of Hope in Undertaker Who Offered Calm Amid Disaster

By HIROKO TABUCHI
As the nation marks the anniversary of the 2011 quake and tsunami, an undertaker who cared for nearly 1,000 corpses using Buddhist rituals is lauded as a hero.

Exodus From North Signals Iraqi Christians' Slow Decline

By JACK HEALY
Iraq's dwindling Christians are leaving because they say they feel discouraged by unemployment and a creeping fear that the violence they had fled was catching up to them.

Violence Continues for Israel and Militants

By FARES AKRAM and ISABEL KERSHNER
Israeli airstrikes that began on Friday afternoon killed several more Palestinian militants and militant groups fired scores of rockets into southern Israel.
BUSINESS

Hits, and Misses, in a War on Bribery

By LESLIE WAYNE
The Justice Department is waging an aggressive - and controversial - campaign against bribery in global business.

Beyond Mile-High Grub: Can Airline Food Be Tasty?

By JAD MOUAWAD
Carriers are turning to science and celebrity chefs to figure out how to make onboard meals more appealing to high-revenue business travelers.
TECHNOLOGY

When Today's Deal Is Tomorrow's Regret

By DOUGLAS QUENQUA
Some people lately find their leisure activities dictated less by their own free will than by the domination of daily deal sites.
Novelties

Automatic Recharging, From a Distance

By ANNE EISENBERG
A new system can wirelessly recharge smartphones and other consumer devices from up to several feet away - and it may eventually find use for electric vehicles and medical implants, too.

The Officiant Among Us

By ELISSA GOOTMAN
Online ministries make it easy for a high school buddy or a beloved uncle to officiate at a couple's wedding.
SPORTS

Canadian Ski Cross Racer Dies

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nick Zoricic, 29, tumbled through the safety nets lining the side of the course as his skis and poles were thrown clear.

Golfer Robert Rock Has a Head for the Game, but No Hat

By KAREN CROUSE
A thick-haired Englishman, Robert Rock has no use for headwear on the golf course. And sponsors have no cap on which to affix their logos.
Soccer Roundup

Likely Goal Is Missed by Officials

By REUTERS
Bolton defeated Queens Park Rangers Saturday in England's Premier League after another apparent goal was disallowed.
U.S. NEWS

Lights! Cameras! (and Cheers) for a Rock Weighing 340 Tons

By ADAM NAGOURNEY
The journey of "Levitated Mass" followed a circuitous route through four counties and 22 cities, took 11 days and ended at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.
This Land

Religious Statues Left Behind Find Their Own Patron Saint

By DAN BARRY
A makeup artist gathers homeless religious statues in a shuttered Catholic church that he owns, and then restores them to their former ethereal state.

Santorum Takes a Decisive Victory in Kansas Caucuses

By TRIP GABRIEL
Rick Santorum extended his winning streak of Midwestern and Southern states with the help of evangelical Christians and others calling themselves "very conservative."
OPINION
Sunday Review

How India Became America

By AKASH KAPUR
The Americanization of India brings prosperity and the collapse of social structures - and young men calling their colleagues "dude."
Editorial

The Power to Kill

The Obama administration has not made a case for killing American citizens without judicial review.
Sunday Review

Hey! You Stole My Name!

By DELIA EPHRON
When my Web site domain name was hijacked, it raised the question: How much was my name worth to me?

Redskins to acquire Rams’ No. 2 pick: The Washington Post Today's Headlines

The Washington Post

TODAY'S HEADLINES

TODAY'S HIGHLIGHTS
Redskins to acquire Rams’ No. 2 pick
In its quest to land a franchise quarterback, Washington agrees to send three No. 1 picks and a second-rounder to the Rams for the rights to the No. 2 overall pick, where it is expected the Redskins will draft Baylor quarterback Robert Griffin III.
(By Mike Jones)

Economic argument getting tougher for GOP
With the economic picture brightening, however slightly, Romney and other Republican presidential candidates are refining their economic attacks against the president.
(By Philip Rucker and David A. Fahrenthold)

Seismologists try to find firm ground
Last year’s earthquake in Japan, and a series of other surprises, shook geologists’ faith in their basic assumptions about seismology.
(By Joel Achenbach)

‘Kony 2012’ goes viral — but what does it mean?
A nonprofit’s video of efforts to capture an Ugandan warlord has sparked an Internet frenzy, with everyone from Justin Bieber to Oprah Winfrey adding to the hype and hyperbole. But the true test for what the film signifies — for the Web, for activism, for how people want to interact with the world around them — won’t be measurable for some time to come.
(By Monica Hesse)

‘Jobs Day’: An economic and political obsession
The release of employment numbers has long been a ritual in Washington, but lately it has turned into an obsession during an election year defined by economic instability.
(By Eli Saslow)

NATION
Assad firmly in control, U.S. analysts say
U.S. intelligence officials describe Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad as firmly in control and increasingly willing to unleash his forces on overmatched opposition groups.
( by Greg Miller and Karen DeYoung , The Washington Post)

Seismologists try to find firm ground
Last year’s earthquake in Japan, and a series of other surprises, shook geologists’ faith in their basic assumptions about seismology.
( by Joel Achenbach , The Washington Post)

Flu strain confirmed in Calvert deaths
Four members of the Calvert County family stricken by flu complications had the same H3N2 strain of influenza A virus, Maryland health officials said Friday.
( by Lena H. Sun , The Washington Post)

All colleges should be women’s colleges
If we have any hope of making our volatile planet more peaceful and sustainable, we are going to have to get more women into public leadership roles.
( by H. Kim Bottomly , The Washington Post)

Rocket-propelled leadership
“My philosophy has been and will continue to be: Do the best we can with what we have.” - NASA’s Patrick Scheuermann
( by Tom Fox , The Washington Post)

More National: Breaking National News & Headlines - Washington Post



METRO
Two sides of H Street NE
On Thursday night, Obama dined there. But nearby the night before, police say they may have foiled a robbery.
( by Martin Weil , The Washington Post)

Suspects: Aspen Hill death an accident
Friends of the victim, 21, tell police they were trying to scare him with a loaded but malfunctioning rifle.
( by Dan Morse , The Washington Post)

Female Korean War veterans honored
Among them was Eleanor Porter, a therapist who married an amputee — and helped hundreds of others.
( by Rachel S. Karas , The Washington Post)

Md. teachers union aims for teamwork
The Montgomery organziation has taken a direct role in key personnel decisions, budgeting and training.
( by Michael Alison Chandler , The Washington Post)

Audit finds shoddy oversight of Alexandria school repair work
Management of the capital improvement budget is fragmented and opaque, an outside firm finds.
( by Patricia Sullivan , The Washington Post)

More Post Local: Washington, DC Area News, Traffic, Weather, Sports & More - The Washington Post


POLITICS
GOP's gains with women vanishing
As the contraception debate continues, female voters are shifting to the Democrats.
( by Karen Tumulty , The Washington Post)

Economic argument getting tougher for GOP
With the economic picture brightening, however slightly, Romney and other Republican presidential candidates are refining their economic attacks against the president.
( by Philip Rucker and David A. Fahrenthold , The Washington Post)

Va. Assembly leaves budget for later
After failing to get a spending bill to the governor, lawmakers must return for a special session.
( by Anita Kumar and Laura Vozzella , The Washington Post)

Romney makes no mention of positive jobs numbers
In a campaign appearance in Jackson, Miss., Mitt Romney crtitized Obama’s handling of the economy without mentioning the new, positive jobs report
( by David Fahrenthold , The Washington Post)

Why is Santorum losing Catholics?
Mitt Romney has run better among Catholics than Rick Santorum, a devout member of the faith.
( by Dan Balz and Scott Clement , The Washington Post)

More Post Politics: Breaking Politics News, Political Analysis & More - The Washington Post


STYLE
Let sleeping arrangements lie
It works better for them to have separate bedrooms, but his mom thinks a breakup is imminent.
(, The Washington Post)

‘Kony 2012’ goes viral — but what does it mean?
A nonprofit’s video of efforts to capture an Ugandan warlord has sparked an Internet frenzy, with everyone from Justin Bieber to Oprah Winfrey adding to the hype and hyperbole. But the true test for what the film signifies — for the Web, for activism, for how people want to interact with the world around them — won’t be measurable for some time to come.
( by Monica Hesse , The Washington Post)

On Love: Andrea Anderson & Chris Byrd
Andrea Anderson and Chris Byrd met at a networking event but were bonded by their faith.
(, The Washington Post)

Pianist Leon Fleisher proves a master at musicianship
Among other pieces, Fleisher mounted a deeply-felt tribute to composer Dina Koston at the Library of Congress on Thursday night.
( by Stephen Brookes , The Washington Post)

Michael Thomas Quintet thrills at Strathmore
Thomas’s quintet — intact after 14 years — relies on riffy melodies and playful but impassioned performances to hit the listener in the gut.
( by Michael J. West , The Washington Post)

More Style: Culture, Arts, Ideas & More - The Washington Post


SPORTS
TV and radio listings: March 10
TV and radio listings: March 10
(, The Washington Post)

OPINION | Redskins make a big midnight call
A possible blockbuster trade with the Rams may bring Robert Griffin III to the Redskins. It’s a risk that could be great or may set the franchise back a decade.
(, The Washington Post)

Redskins to pull off blockbuster trade for 2nd pick
In its quest to land a franchise quarterback, Washington agrees to send three No. 1 picks and a second-rounder to the Rams for the rights to the No. 2 overall pick, where it is expected the Redskins will draft Baylor quarterback Robert Griffin III (pictured).
( by Mike Jones , The Washington Post)

What’s wrong with Ovechkin?
Capitals captain Alex Ovechkin, 26, is suffering through the worst statistical season of his career. What can he do to return to form?
( by Rick Maese and Tarik El-Bashir , The Washington Post)

Oakton girls win AAA title
The Coyer twins power the fourth-ranked Cougars past Princess Anne, 58-39, to become the first Northern Region team since West Springfield in 1999 to win a state title. The win caps a 31-0 season.
( by Paul Tenorio , The Washington Post)

More Sports: Sports News, Scores, Analysis, Schedules & More - The Washington Post


WORLD
Assad firmly in control, U.S. analysts say
U.S. intelligence officials describe Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad as firmly in control and increasingly willing to unleash his forces on overmatched opposition groups.
( by Greg Miller and Karen DeYoung , The Washington Post)

A year after Japan’s triple disaster, an uncertain recovery
Even after months of cleanup, reconstruction depends on whether people stay or go.
( by Chico Harlan , The Washington Post)

Syrian forces kill dozens ahead of peace mission
Syrian forces killed at least 54 people Friday as they sought to quell demonstrations against President Bashar al-Assad before a peace mission by U.N.-Arab League envoy Kofi Annan, opposition activists said.
( by Khaled Yacoub Oweis , The Washington Post)

U.S. to transfer control of Afghan inmates
Step may remove key obstacle to broader deal on terms of U.S. military presence beyond 2014.
( by Ernesto Londoño and Peter Finn , The Washington Post)

Pakistan names new spymaster
Lt. Gen. Zaheer ul-Islam to head spy agency, replacing Lt. Gen. Ahmed Shuja Pasha, chief since 2008.
( by Richard Leiby and Karen DeYoung , The Washington Post)

More World: World News, International News, Foreign Reporting - The Washington Post


LIVE DISCUSSIONS
Free Range on Food: Beer Madness, using a mortar and pestle, Spike Gjerde and more
Have cooking questions? We have answers. Ask us now.
(, vForum)

Carolyn Hax Live: Advice columnist tackles your problems (Thursday, March 15)
Advice Columnist Carolyn Hax takes your questions and comments about the strange train we call life.
(, vForum)

Carolyn Hax Live (Friday, March 9)
Advice Columnist Carolyn Hax takes your questions and comments about the strange train we call life.
(, vForum)

How important is separation of church and state?
Bradley Hirschfield discusses separation of church and state, public prayer and more.
(, vForum)

Outlook: Myths about March Madness
Sports reporter Eric Prisbell separates March Madness fact from fiction.
(, vForum)

More Conversations: Discussions, Blogs, Debates, Live Q&A's and More - The Washington Post


TECHNOLOGY
Kony 2012: Anatomy of a viral campaign
How did a group called Invisible Children draw so much attention to a conflict that dates to the ’80s?
( by Hayley Tsukayama , The Washington Post)

SXSW: Highlight may be 2012’s star
Highlight, a location-based social app, is expected to be the breakout star this year
( by Hayley Tsukayama , The Washington Post)

The new iPad: 5 reasons to buy, 5 reasons not to
Every device has its pros and cons. Here are five reasons to buy — and not to buy — the latest iPad.
( by Hayley Tsukayama , The Washington Post)

Mass Effect 3: Electronic Arts chief executive feeling ‘awfully good’ about launch
Riccitiello is optimistic about the game’s prospects as editorial reviews are very favorable with an aggregated Metacritic score of 94 out of 100.
( by Heinrich Lenhardt | VentureBeat.com , VentureBeat.com)

Explaining the ‘4G’ on the iPhone 4S
Signal strength for “4G” networks showed up on the iPhone 4S overnight, confusing some AT&T customers.
( by Hayley Tsukayama , The Washington Post)

More Technology News - The Washington Post


EDITORIAL
Cheers for U.S. soccer victory

(, The Washington Post)

Rules of ‘him’ and ‘he’

(, The Washington Post)

Coverage of Catholics lacking

(, The Washington Post)

Washington’s real real birthday

(, The Washington Post)

Business stories miss the mark

(, The Washington Post)

More Opinions: Washington Post Opinion, Editorial, Op Ed, Politics Editorials - The Washington Post


BUSINESS
Japan's Nikkei cracks symbolic barrier
As Japan prepares for somber services to mark the anniversary of earthquake and tsunami, the Nikkei returns to pre-disaster levels.
( by Chico Harlan , The Washington Post)

White House names Todd Park as new tech boss
The White House on Friday named Todd Park as U.S. chief technology officer, a post that had high expectations when it was created in 2009, but has produced questionable outcomes, analysts say.
( by Cecilia Kang , The Washington Post)

Kony 2012: Anatomy of a viral campaign
How did a group called Invisible Children draw so much attention to a conflict that dates to the ’80s?
( by Hayley Tsukayama , The Washington Post)

New iPad aimed at sharpening Apple’s tablet lead
Apple Inc. introduced a new version of the iPad, beefing up the two-year-old mobile computer with a sharper screen and faster chip to widen its lead over Amazon.com Inc., Microsoft Corp. and Google Inc. in the tablet market.
( by Adam Satariano and Peter Burrows Bloomberg News , Bloomberg)

Greek deal with creditors shows how Europe has pushed to protect its neighbors
Greece’s success in restructuring its debt could mark an important turning point in Europe’s simmering financial crisis: It shows just how far officials have been able to go in insulating the rest of Europe from Greece’s economic problems.
( by Michael Birnbaum in BERLIN , The Washington Post)

More Business News, Financial News, Business Headlines & Analysis - The Washington Post

NYT Morning Busines News: Discreetly Digital, Erotic Novel Sets American Women Abuzz | The New York Times Today's Headlines

The New York Times
March 10, 2012

Today's Headlines


 
TOP NEWS

U.S. Extends Its Run of Strong Job Growth Another Month

By SHAILA DEWAN
The United States added 227,000 jobs in February, the third straight month of gains over 200,000, while the unemployment rate stayed at 8.3 percent, the Labor Department reported.

German Leader and I.M.F. Chief Split Over Debt

By NICHOLAS KULISH and ANNIE LOWREY
Despite their friendship, Angela Merkel and Christine Lagarde face difficult discussions over how to handle a future crisis, with opposing stances on the amount of money needed to protect vulnerable economies and how it should be raised.
The Long Run

Legislators Recall Governor Who Didn't Mingle

By MICHAEL BARBARO
For Massachusetts officials used to the glad-handing of local politics, Mitt Romney was an unfamiliar breed. His approach could offer hints of how a possible President Romney might deal with Congress.
QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"He campaigned as an outsider, governed as an outsider and left as an outsider."
PETER FLAHERTY, a top aide to Mitt Romney when he was governor of Massachusetts who now works on Mr. Romney's presidential campaign.

Theater
Philip Seymour Hoffman as Willy Loman in the Broadway revival of

Life of a 'Salesman'

Charles Isherwood leads an online conversation about the classic American drama by Arthur Miller.
Opinion
Fighting War Crimes, Without Leaving the Couch?
Room for Debate

Fighting War Crimes, Without Leaving the Couch?

Do social media campaigns like "Kony 2012" give young people a false sense of accomplishment, detracting from real action?
WORLD

India Eyes Muslims Left Behind by Quota System

By JIM YARDLEY
The issue of affirmative action for Muslims surfaced in an election in Uttar Pradesh, with promises to Muslims of quotas like those for low-caste Hindus.

Nuclear Disaster in Japan Was Avoidable, Critics Contend

By MARTIN FACKLER
Insiders from the country's nuclear industry described a culture in which regulators looked the other way while the industry put a higher priority on promoting nuclear energy than protecting public safety.

Pakistan Picks New Director for Spy Agency

By DECLAN WALSH and SALMAN MASOOD
Lt. Gen. Zahir Ul Islam will take over as the director general of Pakistan's powerful intelligence agency, known as the Inter-Services Intelligence Directorate or ISI.
U.S.

Wary but Loyal, Aide Answered Call From Giffords to Run

By JENNIFER MEDINA
Ron Barber, who was at Gabrielle Giffords's side when she was shot and is recovering from some injuries himself, said he could not say no when she asked him to run.

Austin, Proud of Eccentricity, Loses a Favorite

By JOHN SCHWARTZ
Emotions ran high this week as news spread of the death of Albert Leslie Cochran, a cross-dressing, often homeless man who embodied the city's "Keep Austin Weird" spirit.

Solid in Kansas, Santorum Seeks to Build Margin

By TRIP GABRIEL
Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich have largely bypassed Kansas, and Rick Santorum is using his position there to encourage his supporters to turn out in large numbers.
POLITICS
On Politics

Tea Party Movement Takes the Long View

By RICHARD W. STEVENSON
Many Tea Party supporters said that while they would work to help Mitt Romney defeat President Obama, their real passion was for electing small-government conservatives further down the ballot.
The Caucus

Hatch Weighs In on Tax Status of 'Super PACs'

By JONATHAN WEISMAN
The Utah senator accuses Democrats of engaging in 'a politically motivated witch hunt."
The Caucus

Romney Releases His Playlist

By JON PARELES
On Mitt Romney's playlist, songs extol love and perseverance, maturity and positive aspiration, adding a little road-weary loneliness to deflect thoughts of cold elitism
BUSINESS

Discreetly Digital, Erotic Novel Sets American Women Abuzz

By JULIE BOSMAN
The book, "Fifty Shades of Grey" by an obscure author, E L James, has been described as "Mommy porn" and "Twilight" for grown-ups.
News Analysis

Next Time, Greece May Need New Tactics

By LANDON THOMAS Jr.
If the country confronts a new cash crunch in coming years, as many expect, it will not be able to use strong-arm tactics to force losses on its bondholders.
DealBook

Greek Credit-Default Swaps Are Activated

By PETER EAVIS
The International Swaps and Derivatives Association ruled that Greece's debt restructuring would prompt payouts on credit-default swaps tied to the country's government bonds.
TECHNOLOGY

Retailers Add Gadgets for Shoppers at Ease With Technology

By STEPHANIE CLIFFORD
Retailers like Macy's and Nordstrom are accommodating younger consumers who prefer using technology to research products instead of asking employees.

YouTube Subtracts Racy and Raucous to Add a Teaching Tool

By STEPHANIE STROM
The video-sharing Web site has created a way to let schools limit students' access to selected content, providing a portal for free educational materials.
Bits Blog

Open-Source A.W.S.: Creating a Thousand Clouds

By QUENTIN HARDY
Perhaps the most popular open source alternative to Amazon's cloud computing services is Eucalyptus, which seeks to operate alongside Amazon.
SPORTS
Cincinnati 71, Syracuse 68

Bearcats Arrive, and Orange Exit

By ZACH SCHONBRUN
The Bearcats got off to a torrid start Friday by jumping out to a 25-8 lead against the Orange, who have never won the Big East championship in six appearances as the No. 1 seed.

With Extension to Sanchez, Jets Give Up on Manning

By BEN SHPIGEL
Bowing out of the Peyton Manning sweepstakes, the Jets agreed in principle with Mark Sanchez on a new five-year contract that could be worth as much as $68.5 million.
Bucks 119, Knicks 114

Knicks, Unable to Contain Bucks, Lose Fourth Straight

By JOE DIGIOVANNI
With low post defenders Tyson Chandler and Jared Jeffries out with injuries, the Knicks defense continued to struggle in a loss to Milwaukee.
ARTS

That '70s Style, Reinvented

By JAMES C. McKINLEY Jr.
Nate Ruess's long-awaited meeting at the Bowery Hotel with a sought-after producer, Jeff Bhasker, helped change the trajectory of his band.
Music Review

A Love Story Naturally, Without Microphones

By ANTHONY TOMMASINI
The Dicapo Opera Theater's production of "The Most Happy Fella" offers something that is unavailable on Broadway: natural sound.
Critic's Notebook

Off Broadway Faces Perils of Prosperity

By CHARLES ISHERWOOD
Off Broadway's major companies, regenerating for years, are now opening a spate of new theaters, raising questions of commercialism.
NEW YORK / REGION

Fraud Found in Jobs Effort; Blow to Bloomberg

By MICHAEL POWELL
One of New York City's largest nonprofit job placement agencies claimed to have helped find jobs for at least 1,400 people in less than two years when in fact it had not.

N.Y.U.'s Plan for Expansion Draws Anger in Community

By JOSEPH BERGER
The project's future has fallen on the shoulders of two high-profile politicians who aspire to become the city's next mayor.
City Room

When Love Conquers All, Even the Loss of Two Jobs

By JOHN LELAND
A teacher at a Catholic school in St. Louis was fired after announcing he was going to marry his longtime partner. But the couple went ahead with their plans and married on Friday in Central Park.
TRAVEL
Explorer

Out at Sea, Relaxing in the Philippines

By DAN LEVIN
Cutting anchor from civilization and all its modern amenities by exploring some of the most remote islands in the Philippines.
Cultured Traveler

Where Heaven and Earth Come Closer

By ERIC WEINER
Thin places, where the distance between heaven and earth collapses, can relax us and transform us - or, more accurately, unmask us.

Outside Las Vegas, an Ace of a Bike Trail

By MATT VILLANO
The River Mountains Trail is a 35-mile ribbon that circumscribes the River Mountains, connecting Boulder City, Henderson and the wilderness between.
EDITORIALS
Editorial

A Breach of Trust

House Republicans are trying to break the budget agreement and cut spending even more, which would prove that the House cannot be trusted to keep its word.
Editorial

Better Numbers

The job market is showing slow and steady improvement. Employment is on the upswing, but the hole is deep and the gains tenuous.
Editorial

Changing the Chemistry of Earth's Oceans

The burning of fossil fuels since the beginning of the industrial revolution is causing acidification, a change in the chemical balance that threatens the oceans' web of life.
OP-ED
Op-Ed Contributor

Each Teacher Wonders, Is This the One?

By ALEXANDREA J. RAVENELLE
I'm not the only teacher who, facing down an angry student, worries that he could come back firing off more than snide comments.
Op-Ed Columnist

Mitt, Grits and Grit

By CHARLES M. BLOW
As Mitt Romney campaigns in the Deep South, his attempt to connect with southern voters is exposing his some of his greatest weaknesses.
Op-Ed Columnist

The Bad News Is Good News

By GAIL COLLINS
Want to know why we can't get the dog-on-the-roof story straightened out? Just look at the latest happenings in Mittworld.
ON THIS DAY
On March 10, 1985, Konstantin U. Chernenko, Soviet leader for just 13 months, died at age 73. His death was announced on March 11th. Politburo member Mikhail S. Gorbachev was chosen to succeed him.