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Dec 10, 2011

NYT Global Update: Thousands Gather in Russia to Protest Legislative Elections

Global Update


TOP NEWS

Thousands Gather in Russia to Protest Legislative Elections

By ELLEN BARRY
The police estimated that 25,000 protesters gathered in the center of Moscow. But organizers said as many as 80,000 people had joined the rally.

Euro Crisis Pits Germany and U.S. in Tactical Fight

By NICHOLAS KULISH
At the heart of the clash over how best to manage a vast financial crisis is the question of how far governments must bend or even bow to the power of the markets.

Two Self-Declared Leaders Help Keep Congo on Edge

By ADAM NOSSITER
Police officers were reportedly rounding up young men in opposition neighborhoods in Congo's capital a day after the presidential election.
U.S.

Slide Show: Russian Protests

Russians rallied across the country against election fraud in the biggest protests in Prime Minister Vladimir Putin's 12 years in power.
Opinion

Op-Ed Contributor

My Mother-in-Law's One High Day

By MARIE MYUNG-OK LEE
The blessings of a bong: a single gorgeous meal after weeks of chemotherapy and nausea.
WORLD

German Vision Prevails as Leaders Agree on Fiscal Pact

By STEVEN ERLANGER and STEPHEN CASTLE
Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany persuaded every current member of the European Union except Britain to endorse tighter regional oversight of government spending.

In Rejecting Treaty, Cameron Is Isolated

By SARAH LYALL and JULIA WERDIGIER
Prime Minister David Cameron seemingly sacrificed Britain's place in Europe to preserve the pre-eminence of the City, London's financial district.

Euro Zone Agrees to Follow the Original Rules

By STEPHEN CASTLE
Members of the European Union installed rules that would make it harder for them to take on high levels of debt without penalty.
BUSINESS

Moody's Downgrades Top French Banks

By LIZ ALDERMAN
The ratings agency Moody's Investors Service on Friday downgraded the three largest banks in France, and said the French government was likely to step in if conditions worsened.

As Money Flees Russia, Tycoons Find Tough Times

By ANDREW E. KRAMER
Capital flight has re-emerged in modern Russia - a sign of the problems facing the country's business elite, and the economy itself.

The Lasting Shadow of Bernie Madoff

By DIANA B. HENRIQUES
Three years after his arrest, the Ponzi scheme mastermind still haunts his victims, his family and himself.
TECHNOLOGY

On Ledge and Online: Solitary Sport Turns Social

By ALEX LOWTHER
Posting online about ascents in real time is now an accepted practice, but a vocal minority worries about the purity of the sport of rock climbing.
Bits Blog

Where Are the Women Executives in Silicon Valley?

By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER
Technology companies have the lowest percentages of women board members and highest-paid executives among the biggest public companies in California, according to a new study.
Ventures

Everyone Speaks Text Message

By TINA ROSENBERG
Is technology killing indigenous languages or saving them? Well, you may soon be able to text in N'Ko.
SPORTS

Serge Ibaka Is Back on the Block

By JAKE APPLEMAN
Ibaka, who led the N.B.A. last season with 198 blocked shots, has returned to the Thunder after spending the lockout playing in Spain.
Winter Sports Roundup

Power Glide for American Women in Skeleton

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The American women Annie O'Shea and Katie Uhlaender won medals in a World Cup event in France.

2011: The Year of Wheel-to-Wheel Combat

By BRAD SPURGEON
Despite the dominance of Red Bull and its driver Sebastian Vettel, rule changes that encouraged overtaking in Formula One made for exciting races, instead of processional walkovers.
U.S. NEWS

Quality of Air? That's as Murky as Western Sky

By KIRK JOHNSON
The question of how clean the air is in the American West is getting harder to answer, scientists say, with implications for public health, the environment and tourism.

Scientists Say Cod Are Scant; Nets Say Otherwise

By ABBY GOODNOUGH
Regulators and fishermen express fears for the future of an industry synonymous with New England.

Disillusioned Young Immigrant Kills Himself, Starting an Emotional Debate

By MANNY FERNANDEZ
Joaquin Luna Jr. filled the pages of a notebook with goodbyes before he killed himself, but the young Mexican immigrant never fully explained why he took his own life.
OPINION
Op-Ed Contributor

Jordan's Club of Has-Beens

By TIM SEBASTIAN
The ranks of former ministers swell as King Abdullah struggles to satisfy his subjects.
Editorial

Europe's Latest Try

We are not optimistic about Friday's new fiscal pact. More discipline and coordination make sense, but first economies have to start growing.
Editorial

Rescue for the Gulf

The federal government plans to reverse decades of man-made degradation in the Gulf of Mexico. But the question is where will the big money come from.

Politics: Police evict ‘Occupy’ protesters in Boston



By Kate Gibson, MarketWatch

Reuters
Boston Police Department officers remove an Occupy Boston protester from Dewey Square in Boston. Police arrested dozens of people early Saturday as they cleared away the remaining encampment in the city's financial district in a mostly peaceful action.
NEW YORK (MarketWatch) — Police on Saturday removed an anti-Wall Street encampment in Boston’s financial district, arresting 47 in one of the last major U.S. cities where Occupy demonstrators had not yet been evicted, according to media reports.
More than 100 police officers took part in the predawn raid, which began with many of the campers still asleep, Reuters reported.
Thirty-three men and 14 women were arrested, mostly for trespassing, and no violence was reported, the news agency said.
“This is not over, it’s just changing,” Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis said of the Occupy movement, which planned an evening gathering on the Boston Common, a roughly 50-acre green space in the city.
At a news conference Saturday, Boston Mayor Thomas Menino said the city was compelled to evict the protestors in the interest of public safety. He also commended the police for their work and protesters for their restraint, Reuters said.
Saturday’s sweep in Boston was not unexpected, as a Boston judge on Thursday lifted a temporary restraining order that had blocked an eviction, according to a report by the New York Times.
Protesters were notified by Friday that they faced arrest if they did not leave the premises by midnight, the newspaper said.
One protester, Steve O’Brien, a homeless 18-year-old, told the Times he did not know where he would go now, and that he had wanted to be arrested, but officers told him he was not old enough.
The eviction in Boston comes three days after police in San Francisco cleared an Occupy-inspired encampment. Police in New York forcibly ousted protestors from Zuccotti Park in the middle of the night on Nov. 15, and camps in Los Angeles and Philadelphia were cleared on Nov. 30.
The movement’s slogan, “We are the 99%,” is largely a statement about the distribution of wealth in the country and the one percent of Americans who hold a disproportionate share.
Kate Gibson is a reporter for MarketWatch, based in New York.

MarketWatch | The week's top 10 videos


MarketWatch

Weekly Roundup
DECEMBER 10, 2011

The week's top 10 videos on MarketWatch

By MarketWatch



In case you missed them, here are the 10 most popular videos that appeared on MarketWatch for the week of Dec. 5-9:

When will natural-gas cars hit?

Stacey Delo talks with Edmunds.com Senior Editor Bill Visnic about the natural-gas powered Honda Civic and why it's been difficult to bring alternative-fuel vehicles into the market.
 Watch Video Report.


Sentiment look too rosy for stronger stock rally

Stocks like to climb a "wall of worry," according to Mark Hulbert, who says the positive readings on various investor-sentiment surveys suggest it will be tough for stocks to build on recent gains. Laura Mandaro reports.
 Watch Video Report.


A mansion on a bluff with San Francisco views

Located on a promontory on Belvedere Island, this 9,500 square feet home overlooks Richardson Bay and the San Francisco skyline, as well as Mount Tamalpais and the Golden Gate Bridge. The asking price for the six-bedroom house is $21,950,000.
 Watch Video Report.


Investors must stay in control

Even in a market that can outwit the wisest of investors, SmartMoney.com's Jack Hough discusses the three things every investor can control.
 Watch Video Report.


View of NYC's Central Park for $100 million

Craig Karmin has the story of New York City newest residential skyscraper, where penthouse apartments will go for nearly $100 million apiece.
 Watch Video Report.


Plaintiff in Supreme Court health-care case speaks

Mary Brown, a named plaintiff in the challenge to the Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care Act by the National Federation of Independent Business, tells Emily Maltby why she is so passionate about the Supreme Court case.
 Watch Video Report.


Aging trees hang over homeowners' heads

There's something hanging over homeowners' heads out in the nation's older suburbs: branches from aging shade trees. Recent storms showed how destructive and expensive the blow-down can be. Anne Marie Chaker & Leslie Yazel discuss.
 Watch Video Report.


Is the global economy doomed?

Economist and author Peter Schiff discusses events in Europe and the global economy.
 Watch Video Report.


The $300 house

The race is on to create the $300 house for use in developing countries. Professor Vijay Govindarajan explains how the competition came about and how reverse innovation is an opportunity for multinational companies in developed countries.
 Watch Video Report.


Marbury in China: Shooting hoops, doing chores

For former NBA All-Star Stephon Marbury, everything is smaller now that he's in China: the apartments, the contracts, the crowds. But the point guard for the Beijing Ducks says he came here to reboot, not fly high. Loretta Chao reports.
 Watch Video Report.