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Oct 15, 2011

GATA : THE GATA DISPATCH: Saudi central bank says it's not interested in distressed assets or gold

Saudi central bank says it's not interested in distressed assets or gold

Would they really announce any buying in advance and thereby drive up the price they'd have to pay? Or would they deny interest until they got their metal? See:
* * *
By Martin Dokoupil
Reuters
Saturday, October 15, 2011
PARIS -- Saudi Arabia's central bank is not interested in buying distressed or speculative assets such as troubled European debt and gold and the OPEC member's banks are well positioned to withstand the euro zone crisis, its head said on Saturday.
The world's No. 1 oil exporter like most of its Gulf Arab neighbors is a major holder of dollar assets as its riyal currency is pegged to the greenback and crude accounts for 85 percent of its budget revenue.

Asked if the Saudi Arabian Monetary Agency had considered buying European sovereign bonds such as Italian ones, Governor Muhammad al-Jasser told Reuters: "We do not buy specific bonds at all. We have not done it."

"We always have a much more integrated reserve investment strategy which looks at it in a continuous and dynamic way that values security, safety and liquidity and therefore we do not look opportunistically at distressed assets or special assets that come up one way or the other," Jasser said after a meeting of the Group of 20 countries in Paris.

The central bank of Saudi Arabia, which is the only Middle Eastern member of the G20 group of developed and emerging economies, rarely comments on its reserve strategy.
Gold, which has tumbled from a record high of above $1,920 an ounce, is another asset of little interest to the Saudi central bank due to its volatility, Jasser said.
"We have gold in our reserves but we have not bought and we have not sold it in a very long time. It has become a very speculative asset and we do not get into any speculative assets," he said.
Asked whether the central bank was going to stick to this strategy, Jasser said: "Yes".
Boosted by robust oil prices of above $100 per barrel this year, the Saudi central bank's net foreign asset reserves have climbed steadily to a record high of 1.879 trillion riyals ($500 billion) in August.
Gold reserves have been unchanged at 1.556 billion riyals since 2008, the central bank's data show.
Jasser also said U.S. Treasuries continued to be "an important safe haven and major asset" in global financial markets.
"62 percent of global reserves are still in U.S. assets. It is safe to say they are there to stay for a while," he said.
A downgrade of the United States' top-notch "AAA" credit rating by Standard & Poor's in August shocked the global markets but had no adverse impact on its bonds.
Jasser also said banks in the world's top Arab economy were well positioned to deal with any upcoming shocks as well as the European debt crisis. Capital adequacy for banks was north of 17 percent with most of it Tier 1 capital.

"That's very robust. Second, our banks sources of funding are predominantly domestic from domestic deposits which is a reasonably stable source of funding," he said, standing in front of the G20 meeting venue at a sprawling complex of Ministry of Economy, Finance and Industry.
"Most of the lending is domestic also so the exposure to the outside is very limited and therefore we are very confident that our banking system is well positioned to withstand any stress emanating from what's happening in Europe," he said.
Robust lending growth to the private sector of more than 9 percent in the first 10 months of the year indicated strong demand, while inflation has stabilized in a tight range of 4.6-4.9 percent and should begin trending down, Jasser said.
"Our economy is doing very well and is expected to continue next year. This year, I have forecast that we will have at least 5 percent growth and probably something close to that next year," he said.
Analysts polled by Reuters in September expected the $447 billion Saudi economy to expand by 6.5 percent this year and 4.5 percent in 2012 helped by an estimated $130 billion boost in social spending, or nearly 30 percent of GDP.
Jasser said interest rates settings were appropriate at the moment with no signs of inflation coming from monetary impetus.
"I still think it is an appropriate setting now until we see inflation due to monetary impetus," he said.
Asked whether that meant credit growth needed to be in double digits, Jasser said: "Something like that. And it also depends on credit whether it is going to productive activities and leading to growth one would not worry too much about it, if it is going to finance speculative activities one has to worry."
The Saudi central bank has been keeping its repo rate at 2 percent since January 2009 and reverse repo rate at 0.25 percent since June 2009. It needs to hold its key rates near U.S. benchmarks to avoid excessive pressures on its dollar peg.

* * *

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Thursday-Friday, October 20-21, 2011
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MarketWatch | Weekly Rounup: The week's top ten videos

MarketWatch
Weekly Roundup
OCTOBER 15, 2011

The week's top 10 videos on MarketWatch

By MarketWatch



In case you missed them, here are the 10 most popular videos that appeared on MarketWatch for the week of Oct. 10-14:

Mossberg: iPhone 4S is an upgrade but not a must

Facing increasing competition from smart phone competitors, Apple has released the iPhone 4S. After testing the phone, Walt Mossberg finds a lot to like about it but says owners of the iPhone 4 may not need to upgrade.
 Watch Video Report.


Does Herman Cain's 9-9-9 plan add up?

Herman Cain described his 9-9-9 tax plan as one that will raise as much money as the current system, maybe more, and have more people paying taxes. John McKinnon discusses whether the plan really adds up.
 Watch Video Report.


Mossberg tests Siri on iPhone 4S

It's what's inside that counts — such is true in the case of the new iPhone, the iPhone 4S. Should you upgrade? Walt Mossberg gives his assessment and tests the personal assistant feature, Siri.
 Watch Video Report.


What's behind recent stock rally? Sentiment

As the S&P 500 closed below 1,100, sentiment was so bearish that, among contrarians, this scenario ended up being a support for higher prices, according to Mark Hulbert. Laura Mandaro reports.
 Watch Video Report.


Andreessen on Steve Jobs's legacy

Marc Andreessen, co-founder of Andreessen Horowitz, discusses Apple co-founder Steve Jobs's legacy with Alan Murray.
 Watch Video Report.


How one bear uses cash to stay ahead of the market

Newsletter editor Charles Allmon has been bearish and mostly in cash since the 1980s, and proves that you don't have to take huge risks to realize gains from the stock market, according to Mark Hulbert. Laura Mandaro reports.
 Watch Video Report .


Paul McCartney marries for a third time

Sir Paul McCartney married New York heiress Nancy Shevell in a civil ceremony Sunday in London. It was the third marriage for the former Beatle.
 Watch Video Report.


Steve Jobs video memories

Walt Mossberg, Julia Angwin and others reflect on the life and work of Apple co-founder and visionary Steve Jobs, who died Wednesday at the age of 56.
 Watch Video Report.


Apple answers storage issues with iCloud

Apple has launched the iCloud to allow users to store and replicate documents, music, apps and 1,000 recent photos on PCs, the iPhone, iPod touch and iPad. Katherine Boehret says it's a useful device with only minor drawbacks.
 Watch Video Report.


Pink Floyd's Nick Mason on new box set

Pink Floyd drummer Nick Mason sits down with Jim Fusilli to discuss the new box set "Discovery," a career-spanning collection of the band's music.
 Watch Video Report.

The Washington Post Today's Headlines / Today's Highlights / Nation / Metro / Politics / Style / Sports / World / Live Discussions / Technology / Editorial / Business /

The Washington Post

TODAY'S HEADLINES

TODAY'S HIGHLIGHTS
White House eliminates insurance program for long-term care
The Obama administration has eliminated a long-term-care insurance program that was called for in the health-care reform law, saying that it is simply unworkable.
(By N.C. Aizenman)

U.S. goes after Haqqani network
The Obama administration has launched the opening salvos of a new, more aggressive approach toward an Afghan insurgent group it asserts is supported by Pakistan’s government, senior administration officials said.
(By Karen DeYoung)

Probe of alleged assassination plot reaches a chilling name
The Iranian cousin of the man who allegedly attempted to organize the attack in D.C. is Abdul Reza Shahlai, a senior commander in the Quds Force linked to the killing of untold numbers of American troops in Iraq.
(By Peter Finn)

Obama looks to harness anger at Wall Street
The president’s reelection team will try to turn frustrations on the GOP as the Occupy protests grow.
(By Peter Wallsten)

Content on kids’ apps frustrates parents
A lack of consistent rating practices for mobile applications often leaves parents frustrated when programs aimed at children include inappropriate content.
(By Cecilia Kang)

NATION
U.S. goes after Haqqani network
The Obama administration has launched the opening salvos of a new, more aggressive approach toward an Afghan insurgent group it asserts is supported by Pakistan’s government, senior administration officials said.
( by Karen DeYoung , The Washington Post)

Probe of alleged assassination plot reaches a chilling name
The Iranian cousin of the man who allegedly attempted to organize the attack in D.C. is Abdul Reza Shahlai, a senior commander in the Quds Force linked to the killing of untold numbers of American troops in Iraq.
( by Peter Finn , The Washington Post)

Obama to deploy small force to Uganda
About 100 U.S. military advisers will deploy to Uganda and nearby countries to help combat the Lord’s Resistance Army and kill or capture its leader, Joseph Kony, who is accused of war crimes.
( by Scott Wilson and Craig Whitlock , The Washington Post)

U.S. envoy to Syria warns of worsening violence
Robert Ford, the U.S. ambassador to Syria, says he’s more worried about possible civil war, says Assad is exploiting sectarian tensions.
( by Joby Warrick , The Washington Post)

SEC: Companies must report cyberattacks
The agency presses for more disclosure, clarifying that companies must revel data breaches.
( by Ellen Nakashima and David S. Hilzenrath , The Washington Post)



METRO
D.C., Md., VA. health code violations
Food establishments that were closed because of health code violations
(, The Washington Post)

Wal-Mart interest in Shirlington site
Wal-Mart’s interest in building a 50,000-square-foot store in an area of Arlington County has prompted a few zoning questions.
( by Patricia Sullivan , The Washington Post)

7 tornadoes hit Va.
The National Weather Service confirmed that seven tornadoes tore through the state Thursday, including one each in Prince William and Fairfax counties.
( by Martin Weil , The Washington Post)

Change to policy on expired plates proposed
The measure proposed by Mayor Vincent C. Gray would end the arrest of drivers for having expired car registration.
( by Mike DeBonis , The Washington Post)

Billions needed for infrastructure
Without huge investment, aging infrastructure and rising population will overwhelm the system.
( by Ashley Halsey III and Dana A. Hedgpeth , The Washington Post)


POLITICS
Change to policy on expired plates proposed
The measure proposed by Mayor Vincent C. Gray would end the arrest of drivers for having expired car registration.
( by Mike DeBonis , The Washington Post)

Romney increasing campaign spending
Mitt Romney has dramatically accelerated spending on his campaign for the GOP presidential nomination, burning through nearly as much money as he raised in the third quarter.
( by Dan Eggen and T.W. Farnam , The Washington Post)

Additional e-mails show Solyndra concerns
A Treasury Department official urged Energy to consult with Justice before approving loan restructuring.
( by Rosalind S. Helderman and Joe Stephens , The Washington Post)

Key senators back extending federal pay freeze
Senators with oversight of the federal workforce said Congress should freeze the pay of federal employees for a third year and recalculate federal retirement benefits to trim the federal deficit.
( by Ed O'Keefe , The Washington Post)

Does Herman Cain’s 9-9-9 plan make for good marketing, but bad policy?
Herman Cain has experienced a meteoric rise in the polls, and now the candidate who has vaulted into the top tier of the GOP presidential primary will need to add substance to the catchy, yet untested 9-9-9 plan, which forms the backbone of his economic policy.
(, The Washington Post)


STYLE
Putting the brakes on a relationship
Six weeks in, one dater wonders whether things are going too fast.
(, The Washington Post)

12-year project reveals Archimedes texts
“Lost and Found: The Secrets of Archimedes” is as much an exhibition about the effort to restore a 10th-century manuscript as what the book reveals about the mind of a great mathematician.
( by Philip Kennicott , The Washington Post)

Actor draws new attention with Obama musings
Erik Todd Dellums, a local actor and the announcer for Sunday’s King Memorial dedication, has made waves with blog posts about his frustrations with President Obama.
( by Vanessa Williams , The Washington Post)

Music review: Yumi Kurosawa and the Lark Quartet
The Freer and Sackler Galleries East-meets-West musical series continues with Daron Hagen’s concerto for Japanese koto and Western string quartet.
( by Anne Midgette , The Washington Post)

Music review: Works by Miroslav Srnka at the Phillips Collection
The Fama Quartet performed pieces by the Czech composer, including the premiere of his fourth quartet, “Engrams.”
( by Stephen Brookes , The Washington Post)


SPORTS
TV and radio listings: October 15

(, The Washington Post)

In cruel twist, Hairston wears goat’s horns
Brewers infielder Jerry Hairston, a baseball lifer from a respected family of baseball lifers who had beenenjoying the month of his career, commits a crucial error in Game 5 of the NLCS.
(, The Washington Post)

Northwest 34, G-burg 27
Jaguars overcome sloppy field conditions to hold off Gaithersburg.
( by Dan Greenberg , The Washington Post)

South County 45, Lee 21
Devin Vandyke forced two turnovers and Andrew Rector recovered both, turning them into touchdowns for a key Virginia AAA Patriot District victory.
( by James Wagner , The Washington Post)

It’s advantage, Cardinals, in NLCS
Cardinals Manager Tony La Russa makes all the right moves when it comes to pitching changes, helping guide St. Louis to a 7-1 win in Game 5 of the NLCS and a 3-2 series lead.
( by Dave Sheinin , The Washington Post)


WORLD
Afghan parliament clears major hurdle to IMF aid
Lawmakers agree to pay back the central bank for bailing out Kabul Bank last year.
( by Joshua Partlow , The Washington Post)

U.S. goes after Haqqani network
The Obama administration has launched the opening salvos of a new, more aggressive approach toward an Afghan insurgent group it asserts is supported by Pakistan’s government, senior administration officials said.
( by Karen DeYoung , The Washington Post)

NATO forces repel Taliban raid on base
Armed with hand grenades, anti-tank rockets and assault rifles, five attackers, including two suicide bombers, launch the pre-dawn raid.
( by Sayed Salahuddin , The Washington Post)

Probe of alleged assassination plot reaches a chilling name
The Iranian cousin of the man who allegedly attempted to organize the attack in D.C. is Abdul Reza Shahlai, a senior commander in the Quds Force linked to the killing of untold numbers of American troops in Iraq.
( by Peter Finn , The Washington Post)

Obama to deploy small force to Uganda
About 100 U.S. military advisers will deploy to Uganda and nearby countries to help combat the Lord’s Resistance Army and kill or capture its leader, Joseph Kony, who is accused of war crimes.
( by Scott Wilson and Craig Whitlock , The Washington Post)


LIVE DISCUSSIONS
Ask Boswell
Sports Columnist Tom Boswell will take your questions about baseball, the Redskins, the Wizards and more.
(, vForum)

ComPost Live with Alexandra Petri
The Compost, written by Alexandra Petri, offers a lighter take on the news and political in(s)anity of the day.
(, vForum)

Opinion Focus with Eugene Robinson
Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson discusses his recent columns and the latest news in a live Q&A.
(, vForum)

Debt Ceiling drama: Why Jonathan Capehart thinks your voice needs to be heard
In his Post-Partisan blog post today, Opinion writer Jonathan Capehart said that "Folks should be marching on the Capitol" in protest of the way the debt issue is being handled. Do you agree?
(, vForum)

Chatological Humor: Monthly with Moron
Gene Weingarten takes polls and chats about his recent columns.
(, vForum)


TECHNOLOGY
iPhone 4S: sales set records, activation issues irk buyers
The iPhone 4S has been setting records, but some buyers can’t enjoy their phones quite yet.
( by Hayley Tsukayama , The Washington Post)

Siri inspires a Tumblr or two, answers more goofy questions
The blogs document the funniest interactions that Apple users have had with the AI personal assistant in the iPhone 4S.
( by Hayley Tsukayama , The Washington Post)

Google likely to unveil new Android Ice Cream Sandwich operating system next week
Android Ice Cream Sandwich likely to be unveiled at AllThingsD’s AsiaD conference in Hong Kong on Oct. 19.
( by Chris Ziegler , The Washington Post)

Report: Google close to launching music service
Google is reportedly planning an Mp3 service.
( by Hayley Tsukayama , The Washington Post)

Apple iOS 5 issues calming down
Those looking to upgrade to iOS 5 should probably let others find the bugs in the system, AppleBlog’s Darrell Etherington said Thursday.
( by Hayley Tsukayama , The Washington Post)


EDITORIAL
What would MLK say today?
His son writes about his legacy.
( by Martin Luther King III , The Washington Post)

Rage against the elites
From Wall Street to Tahrir Square.
(, The Washington Post)

War of words
How profane should editors let language be?
(, The Washington Post)

The NBA money problem
Labor dispute illustrates an economic truth.
(, The Washington Post)

How to succeed by failing
Steve Jobs showed the way.
(, The Washington Post)


BUSINESS
Madoff Trustee Sues Jewish Association for $5.2 Million
The liquidator of Bernard L. Madoff’s firm sued the Jewish Association for Services for the Aged for $5.2 million in fictitious profit over six years.
( by Linda Sandler Bloomberg News , Bloomberg)

UAW Says Vote on Ford Agreement Flips to Approval From Rejection
Ford Motor Co. hourly workers reversed course yesterday, with 54 percent voting to approve a proposed new four-year contract at the end of a day that started with 53 voting against, according to the United Auto Workers.
( by Keith Naughton Bloomberg News , Bloomberg)

Content on kids’ apps frustrates parents
A lack of consistent rating practices for mobile applications often leaves parents frustrated when programs aimed at children include inappropriate content.
( by Cecilia Kang , The Washington Post)

Lots of advice for the ‘supercommittee’
Friday’s deadline for submitting recommendations to the congressional deficit-reduction panel prompted a flood of advice from lawmakers this week.
( by Lori Montgomery , The Washington Post)

Obama looks to harness anger at Wall Street
The president’s reelection team will try to turn frustrations on the GOP as the Occupy protests grow.
( by Peter Wallsten , The Washington Post)

NYT: Today's Headlines: Top News / Quotation Of The Day / New York / Editorials...


Today's Headlines



TOP NEWS

Egypt's Military Expands Power, Raising Alarms

By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK
A growing number of lawyers and activists are questioning the willingness of the Egyptian military to ultimately submit to civilian authority.

Bishop Indicted; Charge Is Failing to Report Abuse

By A. G. SULZBERGER and LAURIE GOODSTEIN
The indictment of Robert Finn is the first of a Roman Catholic bishop in the 25 years since the scandal over sexual abuse by priests first became public in the United States.

For Perry, Lobbyist Is a Take-No-Prisoners Ally

By JAY ROOT, ROSS RAMSEY and JIM RUTENBERG
Within a few square blocks around the Texas Capitol, Mike Toomey is respected and feared for his keen intellect, tough political tactics and relationship with Rick Perry.
QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"We will keep the power until we have a president."
MAJ. GEN. MAHMOUD HEGAZY, of Egypt, speaking of the military.

Fashion & Style

Video: Bill Cunningham | Flirty

The erogenous zone of present-day fashion is the shoe. Guests put some of the amazing variety in the spotlight at the recent New York and Paris shows.
Opinion

Should Insurers Pay for Eating Disorders?

Residential programs' effectiveness is in doubt. Their steep price is not.
WORLD

Citizens' Testing Finds 20 Hot Spots Around Tokyo

By HIROKO TABUCHI
Radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant may have spread to places where Japan's government hasn't even thought to look.

British Defense Minister Resigns

By JOHN F. BURNS
Liam Fox resigned on Friday after days of searing headlines about revelations that he had given a close friend extensive access to his official activities.

Armed U.S. Advisers to Help Fight African Renegade Group

By THOM SHANKER and RICK GLADSTONE
President Obama said the deployment to Africa was meant to help regional forces combat the Lord's Resistance Army, which has terrorized villagers in at least four countries.
U.S.

Gas Boom Aids Pennsylvania, but Some Worry Over the Risk

By KATHARINE Q. SEELYE
A "gas rush" is revitalizing parts of rural Pennsylvania. But it has had ill effects - on drinking water, roads and housing - and prompted worries about the long term.

Tackling High Infant Mortality Rates Among Blacks

By TIMOTHY WILLIAMS
Nationally, black babies are twice as likely as white infants to die before age 1. In Pittsburgh, where the racial disparity is even sharper, health officials face many hurdles.

Police Clear Camp of Offshoot Demonstrators in Denver

By DAN FROSCH and KIRK JOHNSON
At a Colorado offshoot of the Occupy Wall Street movement, the police met little resistance, though two dozen arrests were made.
POLITICS

Romney Raises $14 Million in 3rd Quarter, Second to Perry's Receipts

By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE
Mr. Romney also spent more than $12 million during the summer, reflecting increased investments in states like New Hampshire and Nevada for the Republican primary season.

South Korea's Leader Helps Obama Woo Michigan

By HELENE COOPER 
President Obama and President Lee Myung-bak of South Korea toured a G.M. plant as part of their free trade victory tour, and Mr. Obama's efforts to shore up political support.

Health Law to Be Revised by Ending a Program

By ROBERT PEAR
The Obama administration says a long-term care program, known as Class, would be too costly.
BUSINESS

In Private, Wall St. Bankers Dismiss Protesters as Unsophisticated

By NELSON D. SCHWARTZ and ERIC DASH
As the demonstrations grow, the different worldviews of bankers show the wide chasms that have opened over who is to blame for economic malaise.

None of the Above

By TARA SIEGEL BERNARD
The most important document for determining financial aid for college is a form that recognizes only heterosexual marriage.

G-20 Seeks Broader Solution for Europe Debt Crisis

By LIZ ALDERMAN
Finance ministers meeting in Paris faced new hurdles after ratings agencies issued warnings about European banks.
TECHNOLOGY

In a Culture Clash, Olympus Ousts Its British Chief

By HIROKO TABUCHI
Michael Woodford lost his job after six months because his management style did not mesh with the Japanese camera maker's executive team.
Advertising

YouTube Makes the Case That It Helps Build Brands

By CLAIRE CAIN MILLER
YouTube is trying to evolve into a destination for professionally produced videos - and the advertisers that want to appear near them.

Samsung Loses Dutch Bid to Ban Apple Products

By REUTERS
A Dutch court turned down Samsung Electronics' request for an injunction against all of Apple's mobile products that use 3G technology, denying it revenge over a similar move by Apple.
SPORTS
Cardinals 7, Brewers 1

Cardinals Don't Waste Off Night by Brewers

By ANDREW KEH
The Cardinals took a 3-2 series lead after the Brewers bounced and bobbled the baseball around the diamond.

In Year 11 as a Tiger, Finding Life After Toledo

By JOANNE C. GERSTNER
Brandon Inge did not quit when he was sent to the minors; now he is hitting .333 in the postseason.

Unflinching Underdog Working on an Upset

By BILL PENNINGTON
Heidelberg heads into its annual meeting with Mount Union, which has won 10 national titles in the past 17 years, with unusual optimism.
ARTS
Music Review

Reckless in Seduction, if Not Onstage

By ANTHONY TOMMASINI
Michael Grandage, in his Metropolitan Opera debut, gave a tastefully safe staging of "Don Giovanni" after losing his lead, the Polish baritone Mariusz Kwiecien, to injury.

Greece's Big Debt Drama Is a Muse for Its Artists

By RACHEL DONADIO
While Greece is grappling with its past and is increasingly uncertain about its future, the present is a wonderful moment of inspiration for the country's artists.
The TV Watch

Among the Lectures, a Bit of Shtick

By ALESSANDRA STANLEY
Rosie O'Donnell's new talk show, which began this week on OWN, sticks out on the network because it is colorful and spontaneous.
NEW YORK / REGION

Calls Flood In, City Backs Off and Protesters Stay

By MICHAEL BARBARO and KATE TAYLOR
The abrupt reversal of plans to empty Zuccotti Park averted a clash at the southern tip of Manhattan.

Regents Plan Push for Aid to Illegal Immigrants

By FERNANDA SANTOS
New York education officials' legislative agenda will focus for the first time on the contentious topic of immigration.

Regents to Vote on Change to Cut Risk of Teachers' Test-Tampering

By SHARON OTTERMAN
The New York State Board of Regents is seeking to improve test security in an era of high-stakes exams and rising pressures on educators.
TRAVEL

Of Parties, Prose and Football

By DWIGHT GARNER
In Oxford, Miss., where Faulkner wrote and Archie Manning played, visitors can walk among legends, and eat fabulously while doing so.

36 Hours in Quebec City

By NOAH ROSENBERG
One of the oldest cities in North America, Quebec City, with its revitalized parks and gleaming cultural centers, has emerged from the long shadow of its popular neighbor, Montreal.
Practical Traveler

Fine-Tuning Your Flight Search

By SUSAN STELLIN
Web sites are moving away from the one-size-fits-all approach to booking a flight.
EDITORIALS
Editorial

Britain's Self-Inflicted Misery

Deficit reduction based on fiscal austerity has led to a flat-lining economy in Britain. It is the wrong strategy for Britain, and for the United States.
Editorial

G.O.P. vs. the Environment

House Republicans keep pounding at the nation's bedrock protections, even including basic clean air and clean water laws.
Editorial

Selective Prosecution in Ukraine

The jail sentence imposed on Yulia Tymoshenko, the former prime minister of Ukraine, reeks of Soviet-style political revenge.
OP-ED
Op-Ed Contributor

A New Pakistan Policy: Containment

By BRUCE O. RIEDEL
It is time for the United States to move to a policy of containment in Pakistan, which will mean a more hostile relationship.
Op-Ed Columnist

The Bleakness of the Bullied

By CHARLES M. BLOW
Bullying isn't just a harmless game, it can be a deadly one, and we need to be reminded of that constantly.
Op-Ed Columnist

Here's the Herminator

By GAIL COLLINS
Readers, readers everywhere. At this week's meeting of the Presidential Primary Book Club, we are discussing "This Is Herman Cain!"
ON THIS DAY
On Oct. 15, 1964, it was announced that Soviet leader Nikita S. Khrushchev had been removed from office. He was succeeded as premier by Alexei N. Kosygin and as Communist Party secretary by Leonid I. Brezhnev.