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Oct 8, 2011

NYT: Breaking News: Secret U.S. Memo Made Legal Case to Kill a Citizen

Breaking News
The New York Times
Saturday, October 8, 2011
-----

Secret U.S. Memo Made Legal Case to Kill a Citizen

The Obama administration’s secret legal memorandum that opened the door to the killing of Anwar al-Awlaki, the American-born radical Muslim cleric hiding in Yemen, found that it would be lawful only if it were not feasible to take him alive, according to people who have read the document.

The memo, written last year, followed months of extensive deliberations and offers a glimpse into the legal debate that led to one of the most significant decisions made by President Obama — to move ahead with the killing of an American citizen without a trial.

The memo provided the justification for acting despite an executive order banning assassinations, a federal law against murder, protections in the Bill of Rights and various strictures of the international laws of war, according to people familiar with the analysis. The memo, however, was narrowly drawn to the specifics of Mr. Awlaki’s case and did not establish a broad new legal doctrine.

Read More:
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/09/world/middleeast/secret-us-memo-made-legal-case-to-kill-a-citizen.html?emc=na

MarketWatch: Weekly Roundup -The week's Top 10 Videos


MarketWatch

Weekly Roundup
OCTOBER 08, 2011

The week's top 10 videos on MarketWatch

By MarketWatch




In case you missed them, here are the 10 most popular videos that appeared on MarketWatch for the week of Oct. 3-7:

Steve Jobs dies at 56

Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died on Wednesday at age 56. Wall Street Journal managing editor Alan Murray and editors discuss Jobs's legacy, early reactions to his death and how his showmanship changed the retail and tech landscape.
 Watch Video Report.


A look back at the life of Steve Jobs

Apple CEO and co-founder Steve Jobs died on Wednesday at the age of 56. A look back at the life of an American business icon.
 Watch Video Report.


Surviving Red October

How to use options, ETFs and sector plays to get through Wall Street's most notorious month without seeing red.
 Watch Video Report.


Apple CEO announces new iPhone 4S

Joann Lublin looks at how Apple's new CEO Tim Cook fared in his first big product lunch with the iPhone 4S and filling the huge shoes of Steve Jobs, who had become synonymous with these events.
 Watch Video Report.


Pressure building for an October breakout

John Nyaradi of Wall Street Sector Selector sees pressure building for a breakout from the stock markets' recent trading range, and says technical signs suggest it will be to the downside.
 Watch Video Report.


The world's cheapest tablet

After over a year's wait since a prototype was first shown to reporters last year, proud Indian officials publicly unveiled the world's cheapest tablet computer on Wednesday, the Aakash Android tablet.
 Watch Video Report.


Is Detroit back in the fast lane?

Liam Denning looks at recent positive sales figures reported by auto makers and answers the question: Is Detroit back?
 Watch Video Report.


Yahoo prepares for possible buyers

Yahoo is preparing to send financial information to potential buyers in the coming days, signaling the Internet company's willingness to run a sale process for all or parts of the company. Anupreeta Das has details.
 Watch Video Report.


Socialcam bring old-time filters to mobile video

Socialcam CEO Michael Seibel explains the new Socialcam to Liz Gannes in a video shot with the new Socialcam.
 Watch Video Report.


Why market is pounding investor myths

This market isn't just pounding your portfolio. It's also smashing some of the biggest myths that investors have lived on for a generation, such as "you can't time the market." Brett Arends explains.
 Watch Video Report.

GATA | THE GATA DISPATCH: James Turk: Why gold is a better currency than

James Turk: Why gold is a better currency than anything governments issue

Submitted by cpowell on 03:54AM ET Saturday, October 8, 2011. Section: Daily Dispatches
11:53a BST Saturday, October 8, 2011


Government currencies around the world are depreciating and being used for political purposes even as the world needs a currency that holds its value and is neutral among the nations, GoldMoney founder and GATA consultant James Turk told a conference of the American Institute for Economic Research in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, in July. That true international currency, Turk said, is gold. His presentation is 23 minutes long and you can find video of it at GoldMoney's Internet site here:

 
CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee Inc.

The Washington Post Today's Headlines: As U.S. troops leave Iraq, State Department ramps up

The Washington Post
TODAY'S HEADLINES

TODAY'S HIGHLIGHTS
As U.S. troops leave Iraq, State Department ramps up

The State Department is racing against an end-of-year deadline to take over Iraq operations from the U.S. military.
(By Mary Beth Sheridan and Dan Zak)

103K jobs added in Sept.; rate remains 9.1%

Job creation picked up some in September, the Labor Department said Friday, helping ease fears that the economy could be slipping into recession.
(By Neil Irwin)

Solyndra loan deal: Warnings of legality came from within Obama administration

Energy Department officials were warned that their plan to help a failing solar company by restructuring its $535 million federal loan could violate the law and should be cleared with the Justice Department, according to newly obtained e-mails from within the Obama administration.
(By Joe Stephens and Carol D. Leonnig)

SEC struggles to turn around under Schapiro

Chair’s efforts hit political, financial headwinds and are further hampered by agency missteps.
(By David S. Hilzenrath)

Yemeni opposition leader one of three women sharing 2011 Nobel Peace Prize

Tawakkol Karman, Liberia’s president and a Liberian activist were jointly awarded.
(By Sudarsan Raghavan and Michael Birnbaum)

NATION
Pipeline’s permit a political problem for Obama
The permit for the TransCanada Keystone XL pipeline extension has become a high-profile political headache for the Obama administration.
( by Juliet Eilperin , The Washington Post)

As U.S. troops leave Iraq, State Department ramps up
The State Department is racing against an end-of-year deadline to take over Iraq operations from the U.S. military.
( by Mary Beth Sheridan and Dan Zak , The Washington Post)

‘Occupy Wall Street,’ 99 percent movements get challenge
The ‘Occupy’ movement has spread from its New York birthplace to several other major cities, including Boston, Washington D.C. and L.A. Now it’s facing pushback.
(, The Washington Post)

Can monarch butterflies make it through Texas?
Monarch butterflies are are on their way to Mexico in their annual migration, but it’s not clear how many will make it through the vast area in Texas stricken by drought and charred by wildfires.
( by Joel Achenbach , The Washington Post)

Debate over faith vs. reason: That’s really dumb.
A new Harvard study got me thinking for the zillionth time about how much I have come to detest the “faith vs. reason” debate.
(, The Washington Post)

METRO
D.C., Md., VA. health code violations
Food establishments that were closed because of health code violations
(, The Washington Post)

D.C. Council debates renewal of grass-cutting contract for Baltimore firm
Debate exposes long-running divide over whether to hire the lowest bidder for District contracts or give preference to D.C. companies.
( by Mike DeBonis , The Washington Post)

Horses return to Rosecroft Raceway
The Prince George’s arena that was bought out of bankruptcy in February will resume live races Oct. 21.
( by Erica W. Morrison , The Washington Post)

Plans for Purple Line move forward
The federal government approved detailed engineering for the proposed Purple Line, a 16-mile light rail linking Montgomery and Prince George’s counties
( by Ovetta Wiggins , The Washington Post)

Odd couples team up to attack Md. redistricting map
Critics on the right and the left are firing barbs and legal threats at a new congressional redistricting map backed by Gov. Martin O’Malley.
( by Ben Pershing , The Washington Post)

POLITICS
D.C. Council debates renewal of grass-cutting contract for Baltimore firm
Debate exposes long-running divide over whether to hire the lowest bidder for District contracts or give preference to D.C. companies.
( by Mike DeBonis , The Washington Post)

Odd couples team up to attack Md. redistricting map
Critics on the right and the left are firing barbs and legal threats at a new congressional redistricting map backed by Gov. Martin O’Malley.
( by Ben Pershing , The Washington Post)

Romney’s religion takes center stage
At the Values Voters summit, a prominent evangelical leader described Mormonism as a “cult” and said GOP presidential contender Mitt Romney is not a Christian.
( by Rachel Weiner , The Washington Post)

Mitt Romney’s remarks on foreign policy at The Citadel, S.C.

(, The Washington Post)

Solyndra loan deal: Warnings of legality came from within Obama administration
Energy Department officials were warned that their plan to help a failing solar company by restructuring its $535 million federal loan could violate the law and should be cleared with the Justice Department, according to newly obtained e-mails from within the Obama administration.
( by Joe Stephens and Carol D. Leonnig , The Washington Post)

STYLE
Carolyn Hax: Help! My boyfriend is distracted.
She’s lost her boyfriend to technology. How does she handle his lack of attentiveness?
(, The Washington Post)

Gannett names new chief executive
Gracia Martore has one of those bios that reads like a Great American Success Story. .
( by Paul Farhi , The Washington Post)

In Beijing, the games continue
China’s capital has gone from stodgy government city to party town in the years since the Olympics.
( by Nancy Trejos , The Washington Post)

Lemieux Pilon 4D Art at the Kennedy Center
Lemieux Pilon 4D Art’s integration of live performers with film figures is seamless and beguiling throughout much of “Norman,” the Canadian troupe’s show playing the Kennedy Center.
( by Nelson Pressley , The Washington Post)

Program schedule
“PBS Arts Fall Festival” announces lineup.
(, The Washington Post)

SPORTS
St. Stephen’s/St. Agnes avenges losses
A season after its first losses to its rival in 17 years, St. Stephen’s/St. Agnes avenges those defeats to Episcopal with a 3-0 victory.
( by Greg Schimmel , The Washington Post)

American League showdown
The Rangers have the better overall talent, but the Tigers have the best player in Justin Verlander as Texas and Detroit get set for the American League Championship Series.
( by Adam Kilgore , The Washington Post)

Leonsis trusts Caps, through thick and thin ice
COLUMN | Capitals owner Ted Leonsis stayed loyal to his front office and roster when many frustrated fans called for radical changes following a disappointing postseason.
(, The Washington Post)

Douglass 32, Crossland 24
Douglass running back Josef Hinnant had his share of highlight plays in Friday’s 32-24 victory at Crossland.
( by James Wagner , The Washington Post)

Northwestern beats Bladensburg, 15-14
A missed field goal in the final minute allows Northwestern to escape with a 15-14 win over Bladensburg.
( by Travis Mewhirter , The Washington Post)

WORLD
Syria troops fire on protesters
Another wave of retaliatory violence kills at least eight and wounds scores in several parts of country.
( by Bassem Mroue , The Washington Post)

Fighters target main Gaddafi base
Forces of Libya’s new rulers assault a convention center in the ousted dictator’s home town of Sirte.
( from News Services and Staff Reports , The Washington Post)

Yemeni opposition leader one of three women sharing 2011 Nobel Peace Prize
Tawakkol Karman, Liberia’s president and a Liberian activist were jointly awarded.
( by Sudarsan Raghavan and Michael Birnbaum , The Washington Post)

As U.S. troops leave Iraq, State Department ramps up
The State Department is racing against an end-of-year deadline to take over Iraq operations from the U.S. military.
( by Mary Beth Sheridan and Dan Zak , The Washington Post)

New charges in Russian journalist’s death
A Chechen businessman is indicted in the 2006 killing of a crusading Russian journalist.
( by Will Englund , The Washington Post)

LIVE DISCUSSIONS
Ask Boswell
Sports Columnist Tom Boswell will take your questions about baseball, the Redskins, the Wizards and more.
(, vForum)

ComPost Live with Alexandra Petri
The Compost, written by Alexandra Petri, offers a lighter take on the news and political in(s)anity of the day.
(, vForum)

Opinion Focus with Eugene Robinson
Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson discusses his recent columns and the latest news in a live Q&A.
(, vForum)

Debt Ceiling drama: Why Jonathan Capehart thinks your voice needs to be heard
In his Post-Partisan blog post today, Opinion writer Jonathan Capehart said that "Folks should be marching on the Capitol" in protest of the way the debt issue is being handled. Do you agree?
(, vForum)

Chatological Humor: Monthly with Moron
Gene Weingarten takes polls and chats about his recent columns.
(, vForum)

TECHNOLOGY
Samsung Mobile Unpacked not happening Oct. 11
Samsung has just announced, rather sensationally, that the product launch it had planned in conjunction with Google for next week’s CTIA will not in fact be happening.
( by Vlad Savov , The Washington Post)

Jobs: ‘I wanted my kids to know me’
Soon-to-be-published Steve Jobs’s biography, by Walter Isaacson, will offer a peek into a very private life.
( by Hayley Tsukayama , The Washington Post)

IPhone 4S: Yes, an upgrade — but still a likely hit
The iPhone 4S may not be an iPhone 5, but it will still sell, analysts say.
( by Hayley Tsukayama , The Washington Post)

iPhone 4S: Should I upgrade?
Here’s a quick guide to the what carriers are offering for the iPhone
( by Hayley Tsukayama , The Washington Post)

EDITORIAL
Protect the states
Plans to change electoral vote allocation are wrong.
(, The Washington Post)

Perry’s hunting camp
His campaign says The Post was wrong.
(, The Washington Post)

Mad as hell
The common man makes a stand.
( by Bill McKibben , The Washington Post)

Another alternative for energy
Improving internal combustion engines remains the best near-term way to reduce oil consumption
( by Robert W. Carling , The Washington Post)

Our man in Syria
Amb. Robert Ford counsels the opposition.
(, The Washington Post)

BUSINESS
More downgrades in Europe
Credit ratings of a dozen British banks and the governments of Italy and Spain take a hit.
( by Karla Adam and Howard Schneider , The Washington Post)

Recalled items faulted in numerous consumer complaints
About 20 percent of incidents reported on a new consumer complaints database involved children’s products, and some occurred after the products were recalled, Kids in Danger found.
( by Dina ElBoghdady , The Washington Post)

103K jobs added in Sept.; rate remains 9.1%
Job creation picked up some in September, the Labor Department said Friday, helping ease fears that the economy could be slipping into recession.
( by Neil Irwin , The Washington Post)

SEC struggles to turn around under Schapiro
Chair’s efforts hit political, financial headwinds and are further hampered by agency missteps.
( by David S. Hilzenrath , The Washington Post)

NYT Today's Headlines: Dexia Board Set to Meet as Break-Up Looms:



Latest News At Time Of Post

6:15 AM ET
Dexia Board Set to Meet as Break-Up Looms
4:45 AM ET
Czechs Bet Heavily on Nuclear Power
2:06 AM ET
Oil Workers Describe Floating for Days in Gulf

TOP NEWS

Adding Jobs, but Not Many, U.S. Economy Seems to Idle

By MOTOKO RICH
American employers added 103,000 jobs in September, the Labor Department said Friday, indicating that the economy is at least not weakening. The jobless rate held steady at 9.1 percent.

E-Mail Shows Senior Energy Official Pushed Solyndra Loan

By ERIC LIPTON and JOHN M. BRODER
A senior Energy Department official inquired frequently about the progress of the loan even though his wife's law firm represented the company and he promised to recuse himself.

In G.O.P. Race, Foreign Policy Is a Footnote

By HELENE COOPER and ASHLEY PARKER
So far, the Republican presidential candidates have been prone to occasional blunders when delving into foreign policy - that is, when they have had anything to say about the topic at all.
QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"I was quite positive about the advent of the euro. Now, I'm not so sure."
SEBASTIAN PETIC, 18, of Slovakia, which is skeptical about Europe's debt bailout.

Multimedia

Video: Living on Wall Street

Since the protests started, the neighborhood of Wall Street has changed, and some residents are fed up.
Opinion
The Occupy Wall Street Quiz
Opinionator | The Thread

The Occupy Wall Street Quiz

After weeks of silence, politicians finally took sides on the Wall Street protests.
WORLD

10 Years Into Afghan War, a Thunderous Duel

By C. J. CHIVERS
Coordinated strikes on outposts near the Pakistan border, timed apparently to mark the 10th anniversary of the start of the Afghan war, caused minimal damage, officers said.

Slovaks Love and Hate Euro; Bailout May Lie in Between

By NICHOLAS KULISH
Bailouts for Greece and other European countries have touched a nerve in Slovakia, which is threatening to derail a rescue plan.

Among 3 Women Awarded Nobel Peace Prize, a Nod to the Arab Spring

By LAURA KASINOF and ROBERT F. WORTH
When Tawakkol Karman was awarded the prize, she became a standard-bearer for the Arab Spring and for the role of women across the Middle East.
U.S.

Panel's Advice on Prostate Test Sets Up Battle

By GARDINER HARRIS
A finding that a blood test to screen for prostate cancer does not save lives, but results in needless medical procedures, is being contested.

Pipeline Review Is Faced With Question of Conflict

By ELISABETH ROSENTHAL and DAN FROSCH
The State Department assigned an important environmental impact study of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline to a company with financial ties to the pipeline operator.

U.S. Attorneys in California Set Crackdown on Marijuana

By JENNIFER MEDINA
Prosecutors said they would concentrate on large, for-profit operations that use the medical law as a cover for large-scale drug operations, with marijuana being sent across state lines.
POLITICS

Prominent Pastor Calls Romney's Church a Cult

By RICHARD A. OPPEL Jr. and ERIK ECKHOLM
In saying Mitt Romney "is not a Christian," Robert Jeffress may have injected an explosive issue into the campaign: the belief by many evangelicals that Mormons are not Christians.

In Iowa, Ethanol Can Still Trip Up a Candidate

By RICHARD A. OPPEL Jr.
Gov. Rick Perry, once an outspoken opponent of federal backing of corn-based fuel, found it better to dodge the issue in Iowa. A flip-flop may yet follow.

Iowa Republicans Eye Jan. 3 for Caucuses

By JEFF ZELENY
Iowa Republicans are tentatively eyeing Jan. 3 as the date that the Iowa caucuses could open the presidential nominating contest.
BUSINESS
Your Money

Checking Account Wars, Behind the Scenes

By RON LIEBER
As the battle is joined over fees, the big banks want to make you pay, and the most aggressive of the little institutions want to pay you.

Where Post Office Is the Town's Heart, Fears of Closings

By STEVEN GREENHOUSE
The deficit-plagued Postal Service has warned 3,700 communities, most rural, that it may shutter the post offices that many residents rely on to pick up their mail and keep up with area news.

Scan-to-Buy Gets a Trial on Television

By STEPHANIE CLIFFORD
In an experiment, the shopping network HSN will use data squares similar to bar codes on its high-definition channel, a code some retailers see as potentially lucrative.
TECHNOLOGY

Sprint's Shares Fall on News It Lacks Money for Upgrades

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The struggling carrier said Friday that it would need to raise more money to build a higher-speed data network.

Europe Approves Microsoft Purchase of Skype

By KEVIN J. O'BRIEN
The assent was the last major hurdle the $8.5 billion deal faced after American regulators approved the transaction in June.
DealBook

Appeasing Critics, Groupon Revises I.P.O. Disclosure

By EVELYN M. RUSLI and MICHAEL J. DE LA MERCED
Groupon continued to respond to criticism over its financial disclosures, once again amending the regulatory filing for its highly anticipated public offering.
SPORTS
Cardinals 1, Phillies 0

Carpenter Finishes Off the Phillies

By TYLER KEPNER
The Cardinals, who led the National League in runs scored, won the fifth game of their division series on Friday because their own ace, Chris Carpenter, beat the Phillies at their own game.
Brewers 3, Diamondbacks 2

Brewers Advance by Beating Diamondbacks in 10th Inning

By PAT BORZI
Milwaukee blew a lead in the ninth, but won in extra innings to advance to its first league championship series in 29 years.

Yanks' Rodriguez Insists He Is Up to the Challenge

By DAVID WALDSTEIN
The Yankees owe Alex Rodriguez $143 million for the next six seasons, after which he will be 41, and he rejected any notion that his performance is in decline.
ARTS

How Do You Move a 340-Ton Artwork? Very Carefully

By ADAM NAGOURNEY
A 340-ton boulder will take a very slow road to be part of an outdoor installation at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.
Exhibition Review

A Body, Blood and Computers: Just Like TV

By CHARLES McGRATH
"CSI: The Experience," a new exhibition at Discovery Times Square, lets you step into the shoes of Grissom, Willows and the other forensic celebrities of the "CSI" TV franchise.
Critic's Notebook

A Game to Make Zynga Nervous

By SETH SCHIESEL
Success in the Sims Social, on Facebook, derives not from luck or skill, but from social interaction.
NEW YORK / REGION

672 School Jobs Are Lost in Largest Single-Agency Layoff Under Bloomberg

By FERNANDA SANTOS
Off the 777 school aides, parent coordinators, family workers and others who received pink slips two weeks ago, about 100 were spared.

For Some, Wall Street Is Main Street

By CARA BUCKLEY
Downtown protesters and their neighbors have a strained relationship, over bathrooms, noise and use of Zuccotti Park.

For Mayor, 'Occupy Wall Street' Evokes Protests From Vietnam Era

By KATE TAYLOR
Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg has become increasingly critical of the Wall Street protests, even while repeatedly defending the right of people to demonstrate.
TRAVEL

Lost in Paris

By MATT GROSS
In a city so well known and loved, where does discovery lie? In the thrill of the new, yes, but also in the surprise of memories waiting at every corner.
Footsteps

Poetry Made Me Do It: My Trip to the Hebrides

By JEFF GORDINIER
A chance encounter with Don Paterson's poem, "Luing" sends a writer to the Scottish island that inspired the verse.
Practical Traveler

After the Storm, Fall Foliage Deals

By MICHELLE HIGGINS
Leaf peepers in the Northeast will find that most storm-damaged roads have been repaired, and hotels are open and offering deals.
EDITORIALS
Editorial

More Bleak Job Numbers

Fears of a double-dip recession may have been calmed, but it is becoming increasingly impossible to undo the damage from years of high unemployment.
Editorial

In Search of ...

Gov. Andrew Cuomo needs to choose dynamic, independent managers for the M.T.A. and the Port Authority.
Editorial

Senator Paul, Lift the Hold

Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky is letting innocent refugees suffer by blocking life-saving benefits for them after two Iraqi men were arrested in his state.
OP-ED
Op-Ed Contributors

Ten Years In, Afghan Myths Live On

By BENJAMIN D. HOPKINS and MAGNUS MARSDEN
The current American strategy of handing over "ownership" of the Afghan war rests on obtaining local "buy in," but this has failed before.
Op-Ed Columnist

Wall Street Weeks

By GAIL COLLINS
Occupy Wall Street has got a great system going. The silence of people raising their hands and wiggling their fingers. Could this be used at the next G.O.P. debate?
Op-Ed Columnist

Desperately Seeking Someone

By CHARLES M. BLOW
Republicans thought the presidential election of 2012 would be a cakewalk. But, so far, the G.O.P. candidates look to be all icing and no substance.
ON THIS DAY
On Oct. 8, 1982, all labor organizations in Poland, including Solidarity, were banned.