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Oct 1, 2011

MarketWatch: Weekly Roundup -The week's Top 10 Videos

MarketWatch
Weekly Roundup
OCTOBER 01, 2011

The week's top 10 videos on MarketWatch

By MarketWatch



In case you missed them, here are the 10 most popular videos that appeared on MarketWatch for the week of Sept. 26-30:

Tough going for gold, and it's looking tougher

October is the worst calendar month on average for gold, according to Mark Hulbert, who says there are some seasonal winds blowing against the yellow metal. But watch for those weddings and festivals in India. Laura Mandaro reports.
 Watch Video Report.


Amazon Kindle Fire vs. Apple iPad: Who's on top?

Amazon's new Kindle Fire, which will offer magazine content and streaming videos, takes aim at Apple's tablet dominance. How does the Kindle Fire stack up against the iPad 2? Should Apple be worried? Stu Woo and Dan Gallagher report.
 Watch Video Report.


An investor view of algorithmic trades

Market volatility has been on the upswing, bringing increased scrutiny for algorithmic and high-frequency trading strategies. What part do these systems play in the market, and how should investors respond? Laura Mandaro discusses the issue with Garrett Nenner, managing director at broker-dealer Momentum Trading Partners.
 Watch Video Report.


History says we could repeat the 1930s

Amid this week's volatile market activity and over economic uncertainty, are we seeing a replay of the 1930s. Mark Hulbert explains.
 Watch Video Report.


Gold and the dot-coms, comparing the bubbles

Investor enthusiasm is particularly keen on the yellow metal, around $1,800 an ounce. How does gold's rise compare to the rise of the Nasdaq Composite Index during the 1990s? Mark Hulbert does the charting, and comes away with compelling findings. Laura Mandaro reports.
 Watch Video Report.


Berkshire to buy back stock

Berkshire Hathaway announces its first ever stock buy-back program. Shira Ovide gives details.
 Watch Video Report.


Where small houses mean brisk sales

The housing market is a bust, with builders struggling and new-home sales sunk in the mud. But that's not the case at one development in suburban Chicago, where prices are rising due to strong demand. Why? It's all in the design. Amy Hoak reports.
 Watch Video Report.


Pawn shops for the (formerly) rich

Cash-poor rich are fueling a continued rise in high-end pawn shops as Robert Frank explains.
 Watch Video Report.


Greeks protest austerity vote

Greek protesters scuffle with police outside parliament after deputies pass an unpopular tax measure as part of the government's austerity program.
 Watch Video Report.


FDA clears way for new skin-cancer diagnostic tool

Tom Burton has the exclusive story of the FDA approving the MelaFind device, a new method for detecting and diagnosing melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.
 Watch Video Report.

The Washington Post Today's Headlines: Aulaqi strike a joint CIA-military effort

The Washington Post


TODAY'S HEADLINES

TODAY'S HIGHLIGHTS
Aulaqi strike a joint CIA-military effort

Anwar al-Aulaqi’s death represents the latest, and perhaps most literal, illustration of the convergence between the CIA and elite U.S. military units in the counterterrorism fight.
(By Greg Miller)

Obama embraces high-risk tactics

In authorizing killing of U.S.-born terrorist, Obama shows willingness to push tactical, legal bounds.
(By Scott Wilson)

U.S.-born al-Qaeda leader Aulaqi is killed

Anwar al-Aulaqi, a radical U.S.-born Muslim cleric and al-Qaeda leader, was killed Friday in a CIA airstrike in Yemen, authorities said.
(By Sudarsan Raghavan)

Secret U.S. memo authorized Aulaqi strike

The administration has faced a legal challenge and public criticism for targeting Aulaqi, who was born in New Mexico, because of constitutional protections afforded U.S. citizens.
(By Peter Finn)

Solar projects get funding before deadline

The Energy Department defied Republican critics Friday by committing an additional $4.7 billion in guarantees toward four big-dollar clean technology projects.
(By Joe Stephens and Carol D. Leonnig)
NATION
Obama embraces high-risk tactics
In authorizing killing of U.S.-born terrorist, Obama shows willingness to push tactical, legal bounds.
( by Scott Wilson , The Washington Post)
Second American is killed in strike
Samir Khan was a primal force in the efforts of al-Qaeda’s Yemen affiliate to sway English speakers.
( by Alice Fordham , The Washington Post)
Aulaqi strike a joint CIA-military effort
Anwar al-Aulaqi’s death represents the latest, and perhaps most literal, illustration of the convergence between the CIA and elite U.S. military units in the counterterrorism fight.
( by Greg Miller , The Washington Post)
Secret U.S. memo authorized Aulaqi strike
The administration has faced a legal challenge and public criticism for targeting Aulaqi, who was born in New Mexico, because of constitutional protections afforded U.S. citizens.
( by Peter Finn , The Washington Post)
Five myths about social media
From the Arab Spring to baby boomers.
(, The Washington Post)

METRO
3 shootings in D.C.
At least three shooting incidents occurred in the District on Sunday and Monday in which nobody was struck.
( by Martin Weil , The Washington Post)

In Langley Park, Purple Line brings fears
The soul of the diverse community could be lost if the rail line through Prince George’s and Montgomery counties becomes reality, some residents worry.
( by Luz Lazo , The Washington Post)

It was a cooler month but dank
As the sun went down Friday evening, along with the temperature, September entered its last hours without recording a 90-degree day.
( by Martin Weil , The Washington Post)

MLK library to keep Sunday hours
Mayor Gray said the city had found extra funding to keep the building open seven days a week.
( by Jimm Phillips , The Washington Post)

GWU student may have started confrontation, police say
A George Washington University graduate student who died of a head injury after an altercation in a McDonald’s near the campus had been drinking and may have instigated the physical confrontation, D.C. police said.
( by Paul Duggan , The Washington Post)

POLITICS
Perry faces challenges in N.H.
Texas Gov. Rick Perry signed a pledge in front of a packed town hall audience here Friday promising to cut government “at all levels,”make the nation energy-independent within eight years and secure the border.
( by Amy Gardner , The Washington Post)

MLK library to keep Sunday hours
Mayor Gray said the city had found extra funding to keep the building open seven days a week.
( by Jimm Phillips , The Washington Post)

Solar projects get funding before deadline
The Energy Department defied Republican critics Friday by committing an additional $4.7 billion in guarantees toward four big-dollar clean technology projects.
( by Joe Stephens and Carol D. Leonnig , The Washington Post)

Christie and his decision
GOP strategists say New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie should decide soon about getting into the presidential race.
( by Philip Rucker and Perry Bacon Jr. , The Washington Post)

Chaplains may perform gay nuptials
The Pentagon said Friday that military chaplains may perform same-sex marriages in states that legally recognize gay marriage.
( by Ed O’Keefe , The Washington Post)

STYLE
Mom’s steaming stresses daughter
It seems like every time this mother calls, she wants to vent. And it’s driving her daughter nuts.
(, The Washington Post)

Richard Feynman: The graphic novel
Physicist Richard Feynman’s genius and his hijinks are explored in a new graphic novel.
( by Monica Hesse , The Washington Post)

Tying the knot, minus the tangles
If you’re about to pop the question, know the rules for jewels.
( by Holly E. Thomas , The Washington Post)

Audra McDonald’s leaving L.A. — for now
In a Q&A, Audra McDonald talked about “Porgy and Bess” and leaving ABC’s “Private Practice.”
( by Nelson Pressley , The Washington Post)

Timpanist Fred Begun keeps his rhythm
The former National Symphony Orchestra timpanist, embarks on new ventures and keeps on drumming.
( by Jessica Goldstein , The Washington Post)

SPORTS
Briar Woods 38, Tuscarora 0
Alex Carter returns the opening kickoff for a touchdown, getting Briar Woods rolling to a 38-0 rout of Tuscarora.
( by Matt Brooks , The Washington Post)

Hylton 34, Gar-Field 21
Two turnovers lead to a pair of early touchdowns for No. 7 Hylton, which logs a 34-21 win over Gar-Field.
( by Preston Williams , The Washington Post)

Heritage 44, Loudoun V. 42
Heritage quarterback Austin Nelson throws five touchdowns as the Pride beats Loudoun Valley 44-42.
( by Josh Barr , The Washington Post)

Tigers-Yankees Game 1 is suspended
Heavy rain flummoxes baseball officials, stops the AL Division Series opener in the second inning and throws both teams’ pitching rotations into disarray.
( by Dave Sheinin , The Washington Post)

Suissa, Churchill hold off Gaithersburg
Senior linebacker keys two crucial turnovers as Bulldogs hold hold off Trojans, 15-13.
( by Ian Quillen , The Washington Post)

WORLD
Seizing an opportunity in Japan's electricity market
In the wake of nuclear disaster, clean-energy advocates challenge Japan’s 10 big power monopolies.
( by Chico Harlan , The Washington Post)

Syrian troops combat renegades
Battles raged Friday between Assad loyalists and soldiers who have turned against regime.
( by Bassem Mroue , The Washington Post)

Second American is killed in strike
Samir Khan was a primal force in the efforts of al-Qaeda’s Yemen affiliate to sway English speakers.
( by Alice Fordham , The Washington Post)

Aulaqi strike a joint CIA-military effort
Anwar al-Aulaqi’s death represents the latest, and perhaps most literal, illustration of the convergence between the CIA and elite U.S. military units in the counterterrorism fight.
( by Greg Miller , The Washington Post)

Gaddafi compound becomes hangout for Libyans
Families cruise slowly around the tree-shaded compound of Bab al-Aziziya, gawking at blackened, looted buildings like tourists on safari.
( by Tara Bahrampour , The Washington Post)

LIVE DISCUSSIONS
Ask Boswell
Sports Columnist Tom Boswell will take your questions about baseball, the Redskins, the Wizards and more.
(, vForum)

ComPost Live with Alexandra Petri
The Compost, written by Alexandra Petri, offers a lighter take on the news and political in(s)anity of the day.
(, vForum)

Opinion Focus with Eugene Robinson
Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson discusses his recent columns and the latest news in a live Q&A.
(, vForum)

Debt Ceiling drama: Why Jonathan Capehart thinks your voice needs to be heard
In his Post-Partisan blog post today, Opinion writer Jonathan Capehart said that "Folks should be marching on the Capitol" in protest of the way the debt issue is being handled. Do you agree?
(, vForum)

Chatological Humor: Monthly with Moron
Gene Weingarten takes polls and chats about his recent columns.
(, vForum)

TECHNOLOGY
Samsung’s Tab 7.0 Plus coming soon
Samsung has gone back to the form factor of its first slate device and updated it with a new Plus model.
( by Vlad Savov , The Washington Post)

Report: Apple iPhone 5 cases in AT&T inventory
Slimmer iPhone cases with a tapered design are reportedly appearing at AT&T stores.
( by Hayley Tsukayama , The Washington Post)

EDITORIAL
Gov. McDonnell’s transportation blunders

(, The Washington Post)

Sorting out U.S.-Russia relations

(, The Washington Post)

Next time, just ask PETA for a shirt

(, The Washington Post)

How D.C. can attract more doctors

(, The Washington Post)

What the Doha Declaration means

(, The Washington Post)

BUSINESS
AT&T asks court to dismiss rival’s lawsuits over merger
Telecom giant says Sprint fears competition from proposed merger with T-Mobile and Cellular South sought favors to support the deal.
( by Cecilia Kang , The Washington Post)
Chu felt pressure to speed up loans
When Steven Chu took the reins of the Energy Department in 2009, he had to grapple with a massive infusion of money, even as critics accused the agency of being too hidebound, too slow in disbursing funds.
( by Brad Plumer , The Washington Post)
Calif. withdraws from 50-state foreclosure talks
California’s attorney general says proposed settlement with banks “is inadequate for California homeowners.”
( by Brady Dennis , The Washington Post)
Declining incomes for Americans
The personal income of Americans dropped for the first time in two years in August, according to government figures released Friday.
( by Jia Lynn Yang and Erica W. Morrison , The Washington Post)
Bank of America faces debit fee fury
Bank of America got pummeled by investors and customers Friday, after announcing a $5 monthly fee on many debit card users when they shop.
( by Brady Dennis , The Washington Post)  


NYT: Today's Headlines: The Threats to a Crucial Canopy



TOP NEWS

Two-Year Manhunt Led to Awlaki Death

By MARK MAZZETTI, ERIC SCHMITT and ROBERT F. WORTH
Anwar al-Awlaki, a leader in Al Qaeda's outpost in Yemen, did not leave much of a trail, frustrating the American and Yemeni officials pursuing him.
News Analysis

Judging a Long, Deadly Reach

By SCOTT SHANE
Some civil libertarians have questioned how the government could take an American citizen's life based on murky intelligence and without an investigation or trial.
Temperature Rising

The Threats to a Crucial Canopy

By JUSTIN GILLIS
Trees, natural carbon sponges, help keep heat-trapping carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere. But insect and human threats are taking a heavy toll on them.
QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"What's tricky here is that many people don't accept that this is a war. I don't think there has ever been a case quite like this."
ROBERT M. CHESNEY, a professor at the University of Texas who specializes in national security law on the killing of Anwar al-Awlaki.

Science

Video: The Forest for the Trees

In Arizona, trees are cut down to save forests from massive fires and to combat climate change.
Opinion
Op-Ed Contributor

You Love Your iPhone. Literally.

Neuroscience suggests that Apple's smartphone activates the part of the brain associated with feelings of love and compassion.
WORLD

Yemenis Say They Have Bigger Problems Than Al Qaeda

By LAURA KASINOF
Most Yemenis had only a faint sense of why the United States considered Anwar al-Awlaki a highly significant target. If anything, Yemenis thought his death would only increase their woes.

Drone Victim Went From American Middle Class to Waging a Media War for Al Qaeda

By ROBBIE BROWN and KIM SEVERSON
Samir Khan left his comfortable life in Charlotte, N.C., for Yemen, started a magazine for jihadists and continued to dodge government and civilian efforts to stop his self-described "media jihad."

Fighting Erupts on Somalia's Border With Kenya

By JEFFREY GETTLEMAN
Shabab militants tried to take back territory from militias allied with the Somali government and were breaking up camps set up for famine victims.
U.S.
This Land

The Money May Be Lacking, but a Library Refuses to Go Quietly

By DAN BARRY
As Central Falls, R.I., fought bankruptcy, a state-appointed receiver closed the library. But residents decided it was something they couldn't do without.
Beliefs

Traditional Meal Ending Holy Days Becomes an Event

By MARK OPPENHEIMER
In recent years, breaking the fast after Yom Kippur has become part of the Jewish social calendar.

Gains Made in Equality of Incomes in Downturn

By SABRINA TAVERNISE
The disparity between men's and women's wages shrank, but only because men earned less, according to a study of Census Bureau data.
POLITICS

Amid G.O.P. Din, Santorum Wages Struggle to Be Heard

By SHERYL GAY STOLBERG
Rick Santorum has taken the offensive against rival social conservative candidates in the Republican presidential field.

Imagining a Christie Campaign for President

By MICHAEL D. SHEAR
Chris Christie, the Republican governor of New Jersey being courted to run for president, is a jumble of political contradictions.

Candidates Pursue Donations on Eve of a Fund-Raising Milestone

By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE
The presidential candidates sprinted toward the third-quarter fund-raising deadline with a flurry of events and last-minute appeals for contributions.
BUSINESS

Remedy Is Elusive as Metallic Hips Fail at a Fast Rate

By BARRY MEIER
As greater numbers of a popular hip implant are beginning to fail, doctors and patients are grappling with how to detect and repair the potential damage.

The Money Is Gone, but the Winery and a Woman's Resolve Remain

By GERALDINE FABRIKANT
Patricia Kluge, once one of the nation's wealthiest divorcees, lost her fortune in a risky winery venture in Virginia. But she didn't lose her resolve to make it succeed.

The Political Pulpit

By STEPHANIE STROM
This weekend, hundreds of ministers will speak up for presidential candidates they favor, flouting a law that prohibits tax-exempt organizations from campaigning on political issues.
TECHNOLOGY

On Facebook, Neighborhoods as They Once Were

By JED LIPINSKI
Current and former New Yorkers are going online to post photographs, documents and other memorabilia of their neighborhoods as they used to be.
App City

Want to Join Me for a Game? Anyone?

By JOSHUA BRUSTEIN
The Sportaneous app has won awards in New York, but its creators are still struggling to build a critical mass of users.

A Trip to China Can Make a Guy Hate His iPhone

By CATHERINE RAMPELL
The monologist Mike Daisey speaks about what defines a real "tech geek" and how his exposure to Chinese factories has changed his relationship with his beloved iPhone.
SPORTS

Yanks Pick Up Where They Left Off: In Weather Delay

By DAVID WALDSTEIN
After having 22 games affected by weather this season, the Yankees opened the postseason with a game that was suspended because of heavy rain.
Rays 9, Rangers 0

Rays Continue Their Run With Rout of Rangers

By TOM SPOUSTA
Nothing is slowing down Tampa Bay. Behind a rookie pitcher, the Rays blasted the Rangers to take a lead in the division series.

Owner Goes All In on the Brewers

By TYLER KEPNER
Lured by the chance to buy a small percentage of the small-market Brewers, Mark Attanasio ended up with controlling interest and an idea of how to be a contender.
ARTS
Television Review | 'Prohibition'

Bellying Up to the Time When America Went Dry

By NEIL GENZLINGER
Ken Burns and Lynn Novick tackle the story of Prohibition and its repeal in his latest PBS documentary, starting on Sunday.
Television Review | 'Catching Hell'

A Chicago Cautionary Tale: Fan Is Still Short for Fanatic

By MIKE HALE
Alex Gibney's "Catching Hell" recounts what happened to a Chicago Cubs fan after he tried to catch a foul ball at Wrigley Field in 2003.

So Far, Sales for New DC Comics Are Super

By GEORGE GENE GUSTINES and ADAM W. KEPLER
The first month of refurbished comics has produced strong results for many of the titles.
NEW YORK / REGION

Wall Street Occupiers, Protesting Till Whenever

By N. R. KLEINFIELD and CARA BUCKLEY
The Manhattan encampment known as Occupy Wall Street has no appointed leaders, no expiration date for its rabble-rousing stay and still-evolving goals and demands.

Devoted Fans Go to the Grave With Team Spirit

By MATT FLEGENHEIMER
Some families are saying goodbye with meticulous floral arrangements bearing the logo of a favorite team.

Despite Upgrades, L.I.R.R.'s Reliability Issues Return With a Bolt of Lightning

By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM
Passengers learned Thursday that even the miracles of modern technology are no match for the ancient woes of the Long Island Rail Road.
TRAVEL

Cucina dell'Arte: High-End Dining in Italy

By FRANK BRUNI
A quest for a different kind of eating in Italy, one that swaps the simple plate of pasta for art on a plate: maccheroni soufflé, urchin risotto and caviar-and-chocolate for dessert.
Explorer

Unforgettable Foods, from Austrian Apricots to Parisian Butter

European correspondents share their most treasured culinary discoveries.

36 Hours in Krakow, Poland

By INGRID K. WILLIAMS
Offbeat galleries and shiny new restaurants are sprouting up in Poland's rejuvenated second city.
EDITORIALS
Editorial

Improving No Child Left Behind

Flexibility is needed, but so is more accountability from teachers and principals.
Editorial

America's Man in Damascus

The United States ambassador in Damascus is courageously standing up for democracy. Why won't Senate Republicans confirm him?
Editorial

The Supreme Court and Health Care Reform

We are certain that health care reform is in the country's interest. If the Supreme Court takes on the issue, it must not let politics influence its decision.
OP-ED
Op-Ed Columnist

Hippies and Hipsters Exhale

By CHARLES M. BLOW
Occupy Wall Street, which seems to be picking up steam, should find some political heroes and issues to champion before it gets written off as a street festival.
Op-Ed Columnist

The Curse of the Mitt

By GAIL COLLINS
Mitt Romney has been knocking over one challenger after another in the G.O.P. presidential race. Is he responsible for the collapse of the Red Sox, too?
Op-Ed Columnist

The Nuremberg Scripts

By JOE NOCERA
Exactly 65 years ago, the Greatest Generation put the Nazis on trial. And Harold Burson reported on it.
ON THIS DAY
On October 1, 1961, Roger Maris of the New York Yankees hit his 61st home run of the season, breaking Babe Ruth's record of 60 set in 1927.