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Jul 20, 2011

TechComapny update: Google’s investment algorithm, Why we’re not getting the backup message, HTC Sensation in the spotlight




Thursday, July 21st 2011




This week on TechCompany we take a look at some of the results of the recent SmartCompany Technology Survey, which found that nearly 20% of business owners and managers don’t know how much data they use on their smartphones – a costly mistake. Are you keeping on top of your bandwidth?

In our Best of the Web, we look at a great article on how Google is using algorithms to determine which companies to invest in, and another on the search giant’s unusual interviewing tactics.

And don’t forget to check out our blogs, especially David Markus’ comments on how businesses still aren’t placing enough emphasis on backing up data.





Patrick Stafford
Editor, TechCompany



FIVE BYTES: Data Dangers 
This week SmartCompany revealed the details of our latest Technology Survey, and some of the results were quite surprising. Read more



GADGET WATCH: HTC Sensation 
HTC has been taking the handset market by storm in the past few years and the HTC Sensation is its latest offer. Read more



MY BEST TECH: Katie May 
KidSpot founder and chief executive Katie May loves Google’s flagship smartphone voice service. Read more



BEST OF THE WEB: Google’s secret investment algorithm 
With millions in tech investments floating around, sparking debate over whether the current market is a bubble or not, Google has decided to get in on the action as well. Read more



IT Systems – David Markus 
Are we getting the message about backup? 
Australian businesses are still under-investing in the technology required to keep data recoverable, so when it comes to the subject of backup – I have a lot to say! Read more



Internet Secrets – Craig Reardon 
Web terms SME operators need to understand #3: Integration 
If your website doesn’t sit on a “website platform” you are paying too much. Read more



Facebook Know-how - Lara Solomon 
Is CPM or CPC better for Facebook ads? 
Unsure whether to opt for CPM or CPC to help promote your Facebook page, Facebook event or website? Help is at hand. Read more



Business Tech Talk - Paul Wallbank 
The quest for virility 
Is the chase for internet numbers a mug’s game? Read more



Online Sales – Chris Thomas 
Facebook duplicate Places must be addressed 
While Google Places has some problems, it certainly has nowhere near the level of issues Facebook has. Read more

The Australian Capital Circle: Privacy crackdown looms amid carbon crisis

Capital Circle Newsletter
Privacy crackdown looms amid carbon crisis
 
The beleaguered Gillard government will open a new reform front, pushing for a legal right to privacy in the wake of the News of the World scandal.

Julia Gillard is in Ipswich, Queensland, this morning, where she'll open the the Brassall State School Hall.
Tony Abbott is in Melbourne where he'll visit the Monash Medical Centre with Premier Ted Baillieu.
Questions: It's now fairly clear the Gillard government will use the British phone hacking crisis to crack down on Australia's media. Privacy Minister Brendan O'Connor has flagged a new legislated right to privacy in the wake of the scandal. Expect this to be vigorously opposed by Australian media companies as an attack on press freedom. Crucially, there is absolutely no evidence here of the sort of journalistic malpractice exposed in Britain. Mr O'Connor did not nominate any previous local examples of the sort of conduct he wants to avoid.
As she considers a Greens calls for a media inquiry, Julia Gillard yesterday declared that News Ltd had "hard questions to answer", following the News of the World scandal. But she won't say what they are. Are they secret questions? It's all very unclear. News Ltd chairman and chief executive John Hartigan said the accusation was "unjustified and regrettable".
If the government is committed to the pursuit of answers to "hard questions", perhaps it should look at reforms to the farce that is question time. ABC boss Mark Scott suggested a solution to the problem last night - adopting the British system of Prime Minister's questions. It involves a ballot for questioners and backbenchers can ask supplementaries simply by leaping to their feet. "They just get through 20x as many questions as the House of Reps does in the same amount of time," he tweeted. A twitter imitator of Speaker Harry Jenkins @HarryJ-Speaker gave short shrift to the suggestion. "I think not! ORDER!"
Lookalike: Speaking of the British parliament, was th
Read more...
 
Mumble
Peter Brent
Peter Brent
 
Take a bow Andrew Peacock
Here in Australia we are not short of ex-leaders of national parties. Currently there are six former prime ministers floating around and eight opposition leaders…
 
More Peter Brent

The Australian Business Briefing: Intel slips despite upbeat outlook






Intel slips despite upbeat outlook
Intel chip Drew FitzGerald THE world's biggest chipmaker has posted a better-than-expected profit and an upbeat outlook, but shares fell on weak Atom sales.
 
Caution nudges Wall St lower
Wall St Steven Russolillo US stocks closed lower as investors traded cautiously a day after the Dow notched its biggest advance of the year.
 
Obama open to short-term deal
US President Barack Obama Jared Favole BARACK Obama is open to a short-term deal to raise the debt ceiling if negotiators need a "few days" to reach agreement.
 
Woolies warns of tough times
Woolworths Blair Speedy WOOLWORTHS boss Michael Luscombe has warned successor Grant O'Brien that he is in for a tough first year as chief executive
 
Iron ore at core of BHP bonanza
biliton Matt Chambers BHP Billiton is on track for a full-year net profit of $US22bn after releasing an impressive final-quarter production report
 
CBA lobbies RBA on credit card reform
Credit cards Scott Murdoch THE Commonwealth Bank of Australia is lobbying the RBA to scrap a proposed cap on credit card surcharges
 
Murdoch shores up News shares
rupert murdoch James Chessell RUPERT Murdoch's appearance before the UK inquiry into the phone hacking scandal has helped to shore up News Corporation's share price
 
ASIC splurges on advertising
ASIC Annabel Hepworth ASIC has paid for 14 advertorials in women's magazines since February, declaring that communications are at the heart of its work.
 
Financial Markets
Caution nudges Wall St lower
Wall St Steven Russolillo US stocks closed lower as investors traded cautiously a day after the Dow notched its biggest advance of the year.
 
Gold falls for a second day
Copper dips on profit-taking
 
Financial Markets Coverage
 
Mining & Energy
Gold falls for a second day
Bullion Matt Day GOLD futures fell today as stability in equities markets eased investor demand for precious metals as a refuge.
 
Copper dips on profit-taking
Oil firms in volatile session
 
More Mining & Energy
 

The Economist | Seleted New Articles: Democrady in America / Free Exchange / Buttonwood ... and more



Democracy in America agrees that vaccinations are a CIA plot

Free exchange delivers your daily debt-ceiling update

Buttonwood derides a plan to solve the debt crisis by taxing banks

Johnson finds that journalists show herd behaviour when markets do

Eastern approaches sees: Lithuania's row with Austria widen

Video: Closing in on Tripoli

Daily chart: The flight to safety

Online debate: Has the internet improved journalism for everyone—or just for news junkies?

MarketWatch | Personal Finance Daily: A city's ‘walkability' can boost home values


MarketWatch

Personal Finance Daily
JULY 20, 2011

A city's ‘walkability' can boost home values

By MarketWatch



Don't miss these top stories:

Which cities in the U.S. are most — and least — walkable? Read Amy Hoak's story today to find out, and check out our slide show for maps that give a graphic representation of walkability, or lack thereof. As Amy notes in her story, there's evidence that if your home is in a "walkable" neighborhood, it will fetch a higher price than a similar home in a less walkable area.

Plus, don't miss Ruth Mantell's story on how the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is pushing ahead on several key consumer initiatives, despite the fact that some lawmakers appear ready to drag their heels on President Obama's nominee to head the agency.

I'm lucky enough to live in a highly walkable city. San Francisco's hills, however, aren't exactly conducive to ambling. This is more like Class 4 mountain climbing.

Andrea Coombes , Personal Finance editor

REAL ESTATE

The 10 most walkable U.S. cities

New York is the most walkable city in the U.S., with many of its residents able to forgo owning a car or able to leave their cars behind when going to neighborhood amenities such as grocery stores and coffee shops, according to a report released Wednesday.
Read more: The 10 most walkable U.S. cities.


Top 3 most walkable, 3 least walkable U.S. cities

New York is the most walkable city in the U.S., with many of its residents able to forgo owning a car or able to leave their cars behind when going to neighborhood amenities, but Jacksonville, Fla., is the least walkable, according to a report released Wednesday.
See slide show: Top 3 most walkable, 3 least walkable U.S. cities.


Sales of existing homes slip 0.8% in June

Sales of existing homes slipped in June to a seven-month low, with a trade group attributing the weak economy and a spike in cancellations for the surprise downturn.
Read more: Sales of existing homes slip 0.8% in June.


SPENDING & SAVING

Mortgages, credit cards in CFPB's focus now

Mortgage forms, consumer credit-card complaints, protecting veterans — these are among the first areas the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is addressing, even as lawmakers continue to argue over the agency's leadership.
Read more: Mortgage, credit cards in CFPB's focus now.


INVESTING

Why debt-ceiling brawl hasn't rattled bonds, yet

Washington is rife with high drama about a debt ceiling deal and potential first-ever default by the U.S. government, but one wouldn't know it by watching the bond market — at least not yet.
Read more: Why debt-ceiling brawl hasn't rattled bonds, yet.


Investors remain cautious about Arab Spring

Six months after the Arab Spring brought movement toward democracy to Egypt and Tunisia, investors are remaining on the sidelines, awaiting more clarity over the direction of governments, experts said Wednesday at a World Bank forum on the region.
Read more: Investors remain cautious about Arab Spring.


ECONOMY & POLITICS

Debt fight may already be hurting U.S. economy

The fight in Washington over how to tack the growing U.S. debt might already be hurting the economy, according to a Goldman Sachs economist.
Read more: Debt fight may already be hurting U.S, economy.


Smoke and mirrors with the federal deficit

The so-called Gang of Six senators releases a new budget deficit plan that is largely smoke and mirrors, and that only in the U.S. Senate would appear as a real solution to anything.
Read more: Smoke and mirrors with the federal deficit.


Exxon, government pressed for answers to spill

An Exxon Mobil executive and a Transportation Department regulator were pressed in the Senate Wednesday to provide answers on what led to the recent Yellowstone River oil spill.
Read more: Exxon, government pressed for answers to spill.


INTERNATIONAL

Radioactive cows are latest beef in Japan

In another reminder that radiation spewed by the Tepco's Fukushima Daiichi plant is turning up in the food supply, the Japanese government orders the halt of all beef-cattle shipments from Fukushima prefecture.
Read more: Radioactive cows are latest beef in Japan.


Printing money is Europe's only way out

One thing that can't be underestimated is the political will of Europe's leaders to keep the euro alive, which is why Europe will likely turn to massive printing of money to prevent a breakup.
Read more: Printing money is Europe's only way out.