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Jun 19, 2011

BBC South Asia News: US confirms Taliban peace talks - 20 June 2011 Last updated at 04:12 GMT



20 June 2011 Last updated at 04:12 GMT

US confirms Taliban peace talksTaliban fighters at an undisclosed location in Afghanistan (Jan 2009)

The US and a number of other countries are holding "outreach" talks with the Taliban, US Defence Secretary Robert Gates confirms.

Sri Lankan army soldiers patrol along the Jaffna Peninsula in April 2008Sri Lanka president in US summons

Sri Lanka's president receives a US court summons over cases filed by relatives of Tamil victims of alleged extra-judicial killings during the civil war.

Map of PakistanPakistan fights Taliban on border New

Pakistani military officials say that hundreds of soldiers have carried out an assault on Taliban militants close to the Afghan border.

Sport

Asian business


Financial Times | FTFM Opinion: On the Greek debt crisis evolutionary road




On the Greek debt crisis evolutionary road

By John Dizard 

Published: June 19 2011 08:52 | Last updated: June 19 2011 08:52
Some day in the far future, archaeologists from this or another planet will carefully extract the bones of homo eurocraticus from some ancient cliff face near the former location of Brussels, and determine just where his evolutionary development took a wrong turn. I am pretty sure they will set the time for this disaster somewhere in the months just past or just coming. Maybe they will be able to date it from some nearby petrified paper on “private sector involvement”; one I saw already seemed to be turning to stone.
Anyway, as small furry creatures who need to adapt as fast as possible to new circumstances, we don’t have too much time to waste right now wondering about that species. Certainly they didn’t spend their days thinking about our welfare.

To read  full article , Please click:

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/33d2f6fe-98c5-11e0-bd66-00144feab49a.html#axzz1PmmO6vTo


GATA: THE GATA DISPATCH: For South Africa's sickened gold miners, a long wait for justice

For South Africa's sickened gold miners, a long wait for justice

By Geoffrey York
The Globe and Mail, Toronto
Monday, June 20, 2011
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- His breathing is laboured, his chest is tight, and he is too weak to work in his garden any more. At the age of 63, former mine worker Wilson Mafolwana wonders if he'll still be alive when justice is done.
He is among the millions of migrant workers who toiled in South Africa's gold mines in the apartheid era, building the world's biggest gold industry -- and often sacrificing their health in the process. Breathing clouds of dust, usually without ventilation masks, tens of thousands of miners contracted silicosis and tuberculosis, and many are now dying.
Mr. Mafolwana and 17 other ex-miners with silicosis have launched a test case against the South African unit of Anglo American, one of the world's biggest mining companies, to seek compensation for their illnesses. But the case has dragged on for seven years, with no decision expected until next year at the earliest.
While the company fights the lawsuit with all its legal and financial resources, four of the 18 former miners have died. Others grow sicker every day.
Death is the constant shadow that haunts the ex-mine workers as they struggle for compensation. In a separate case this year, Thembekile Mankayi won the right to sue his former employer, AngloGold Ashanti, for compensation for the silicosis that he suffered while working underground for 16 years. Tragically, he never witnessed the court victory because he died of lung disease at the age of 53 -- less than a week before the ruling. After the ruling, AngloGold said it will continue to argue against his legal claim.

Under apartheid, black migrant labourers usually had the most dangerous jobs in the mines, with little safety equipment. About 25 per cent ended up with silicosis -- a much higher percentage than among the white workers. Even their compensation payments were discriminatory, because they were based on earnings, which were much smaller for black workers than for whites.
Thousands of ex-miners have died of respiratory illnesses without treatment or compensation, often because they were too weak to reach a hospital for diagnosis. Activists call it "an unfolding public health disaster." Less than half of the victims have received compensation, usually just a few thousand dollars or less. The same problem extends across sub-Saharan Africa, where up to 760,000 new cases of tuberculosis annually can be attributed to the mining industry, according to a recent study.
Black mine workers such as Mr. Mankayi "have contributed enormously to this country's economic wealth and prosperity, at great cost to themselves and to their health," the South African Constitutional Court said in its decision this year. As a result of its ruling, thousands of mine workers will now proceed with a class-action lawsuit against South African mining companies. Billions of dollars could be at stake.
But the compensation may be for their surviving families, not the workers themselves. In an interview, Mr. Mafolwana was forced to pause often to catch his breath. He worries that he could die before the test case is over.
"Justice has not been done, and some people have already died," he said. "I could pass on too. My health is deteriorating. When it is rainy or cold, my chest is always tight."
Mr. Mafolwana first noticed the silicosis symptoms in the late 1980s, when he had trouble breathing, but he could not afford to quit his underground job. Basic health measures, such as distributing masks and using water to suppress the dust, were rarely taken by the employers, he says. He finally left the job in 1994 when he could work no longer.
"I felt something in my chest when I was working, but the company doctor refused to take me out from the underground job," he said. "It was always dusty. We asked them to please protect us from the dust, but they didn't give us a mask, except when the inspectors came."
Anglo-American says it is not responsible for the compensation claims because it owned only a minority share in the South African mines where the plaintiffs were working. It says it is "sympathetic" to the plight of the former workers and is working to find a "sustainable solution" so that they can obtain medical treatment and compensation benefits.
One of the workers in the test case, 48-year-old Alpheus Blom, attended the annual meeting of Anglo-American in London last year -- his first trip outside South Africa. In a statement read to the shareholders by his wife, he described how he contracted silicosis and tuberculosis after 17 years in one of Anglo's mines. He recalled how the black workers were forced to make their own rudimentary masks by stealing bandages because the mine refused to give masks to them.
"The gold-mining industry knew that thousands of miners were contracting silicosis each year," he said. "They knew there was too much dust. We should have been able to wash our overalls every night and use showers, to reduce the amount of dust we inhaled. White miners were given access to showers and changing rooms, but black miners were not."
This year Mr. Blom wanted to attend the Anglo-American annual meeting again, but his health had deteriorated and he was too sick to travel to London.
Tony Davies, a South African medical expert, says the country has known since 1914 that most of its mining deaths are due to silicosis, caused by inhaling particles of quartz. Silicosis causes scarring of the lungs, impedes breathing and can eventually cause heart failure. Studies in the 1990s showed a "horrendous" rate of silicosis among South African mine workers, he said.
Tuberculosis rates among mine workers in South Africa are hundreds of times higher than in North America, Dr. Davies said. "It's a massive, massive epidemic."

* * *
Join GATA here:
Gold Rush 2011
GATA's London Conference
Thursday-Saturday, August 4-6, 2011
Savoy Hotel, London, England
http://www.gatagoldrush.com
Support GATA by purchasing gold and silver commemorative coins:
https://www.amsterdamgold.eu/gata/index.asp?BiD=12
Or by purchasing a colorful GATA T-shirt:
http://gata.org/tshirts
Or a colorful poster of GATA's full-page ad in The Wall Street Journal on January 31, 2009:
http://gata.org/node/wallstreetjournal
Or a video disc of GATA's 2005 Gold Rush 21 conference in the Yukon:
http://www.goldrush21.com/
Help keep GATA going
GATA is a civil rights and educational organization based in the United States and tax-exempt under the U.S. Internal Revenue Code. Its e-mail dispatches are free, and you can subscribe at:
http://www.gata.org
To contribute to GATA, please visit:
http://www.gata.org/node/16

GATA: THE GATA DISPATCH: Sinclair, Norcini interviewed by King World News on undervaluation of mining shares.

Sinclair, Norcini interviewed by King World News on undervaluation of mining shares

10p ET Sunday, June 19, 2011
Dear Friend of GATA and Gold:
Eric King of King World News today interviewed gold trader and mining entrepreneur Jim Sinclair and futures market analyst Dan Norcini about the strange depression in gold and silver mining shares. Sinclair says it's the work of hedge funds and that the lower they push mining share prices, the more acquisitions of underpriced companies there will be. Meanwhile Norcini remarks that some mining share valuations are absurdly low and that fundamentals are bound to restore them to reality. You can listen to the interview at King World News here:
Sinclair will speak at GATA's Gold Rush 2011 conference in London in August:
CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee Inc.


Join GATA here: Gold Rush 2011
GATA's London Conference
Thursday-Saturday, August 4-6, 2011
Savoy Hotel, London, England

http://www.gatagoldrush.com

Support GATA by purchasing gold and silver commemorative coins:

https://www.amsterdamgold.eu/gata/index.asp?BiD=12
Or by purchasing a colorful GATA T-shirt:
http://gata.org/tshirts
Or a colorful poster of GATA's full-page ad in The Wall Street Journal on January 31, 2009:
http://gata.org/node/wallstreetjournal
Or a video disc of GATA's 2005 Gold Rush 21 conference in the Yukon:
http://www.goldrush21.com/
Help keep GATA going
GATA is a civil rights and educational organization based in the United States and tax-exempt under the U.S. Internal Revenue Code. Its e-mail dispatches are free, and you can subscribe at:
http://www.gata.org
To contribute to GATA, please visit:
http://www.gata.org/node/16

Financial & Forex Info | PIng Newsletter: Cyber attack message that lulz you




Ping Newsletter
Cyber attack message that lulz you
VISITING the LulzSec website, you are greeted with a blast from The Love Boat, the theme tune to the 1970s and 80s television show.
 
NBN to link those it misses, if they pay
THE NBN Co has started inviting Tasmanians living outside the fibre footprint of the National Broadband Network to connect their homes.
 
Turnbull pushes alternative to NBN
The federal opposition has flagged a campaign for a voucher-style approach to the rollout of fibre cable in greenfield developments
 
Obama to get more personal with tweeters
BARACK Obama will start using Twitter regularly, signing his personal tweets "-BO", his campaign staff say.
 
ICANN votes today on domain suffixes
A GLOBAL body is set to vote in Singapore today on a revolutionary plan to open up new domain suffixes for private companies.
 
Hackers steal 1.29m records from Sega
Hackers have stolen the personal data of some 1.29 million customers of the Japanese game maker Sega, the company has revealed.
 
Facebook ups ante over mobile apps
FACEBOOK is angling to play a bigger role in shaping the way software gets developed for mobile devices.
 
NSW government opens door to IT industry
THE O'Farrell government is on track to deliver on its promise to reform NSW's public sector ICT industry, worth around $2 billion per annum.
 
Job cuts over delayed new BlackBerry
THE maker of BlackBerry phones slashed its earnings outlook and flagged job cuts due to delays in new smartphones, sending shares tumbling.
 
SAS, Accenture in data analytics alliance
SAS is cementing its partnership with Accenture, with the pair agreeing to jointly develop next-generation capabilities and take them to market.
 
Service industries key to the future
SERVICE industries -- from IT to financial to personal -- are the future for Australia, says IBISWorld.
 
ASIC leaves iSoft parties at sea
ISOFT hopes shareholders won't let the supposed "benefits" one shareholder got cloud their vision on the takeover.
 
NBN chief admits mistakes on Alcatel
MICHAEL Quigley admits his incorrect statements about the Alcatel corruption scandal gave the impression he "didn't give all of the facts".
 
No hope for the stock shockers
THE Australian stockmarket has long lost international support and is now in danger of losing domestic institutional support.
 
'Big Blue' IBM celebrates 100th birthday
TO celebrate the mothership's 100th birthday, the 78-year-old IBM Australia threw a party with one current and five former CEOs as the birthday boys.
Click here for all headlines

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Financial & Forex Info | The Australian Business Briefing: Russians chase the Aussie dollar








Russians chase the Aussie dollar
St. Basil Cathedral Glenda Korporaal THE Russian Central Bank will pour up to $US5 billion ($4.7bn) into the Australian dollar in a fresh wave of support for the currency.
 
Insurers count disaster costs
Flood Mitchell Bingemann, Insurance THE spectre of more catastrophic events continues to haunt the insurance market.
 
Mineral Deposits lands big African deal
ANGLOGOLD US GOLD MINE Matt Chambers MINERAL sands miner Mineral Deposits is planning to announce a $1 billion-plus joint venture with French major Eramet.
 
Old mining players keep their boots on
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PacBrands defends China move
James MacKenzie, Pacific Brands Teresa Ooi PACIFIC Brands chairman James MacKenzie has defended the company's move to manufacture clothing in China.
 
Cashed-up Chinese wear Prada
Chinese yuan Paul Garvey, Hong Kong IT'S a scene Australia's retailers can only dream about: hundreds of cashed-up shoppers eager to spend thousands of dollars on a handbag.
 
Cabinet to consider Telstra-NBN deal
Broadband Michael Bingemann THE $11bn deal for Telstra to transfer its fixed-line monopoly to the NBN could be finalised within days as cabinet meets to consider the agreement.
 
NBN to link those it misses, if they pay
Broadband cables Mitchell Bingemann THE NBN Co has started inviting Tasmanians living outside the fibre footprint of the National Broadband Network to connect their homes.
 
Financial Markets
Russians chase the Aussie dollar
St. Basil Cathedral Glenda Korporaal THE Russian Central Bank will pour up to $US5 billion ($4.7bn) into the Australian dollar in a fresh wave of support for the currency.
 
Local shares beat fixed interest
'Weak' economy is a structural adjustment
 
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Mining & Energy
Cash crunch for the minnows
Production at a Kingsgate Consolidated gold site. Robin Bromby, Pure Speculation CAUTION: there's a capital squeeze coming soon to a mining company near you.
 
Minmetals' bid was 'poor form'
Rinehart gets in first with Galilee exports
 
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