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May 28, 2011

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News: 1115a 5/28 Update: Astronauts wrap up CO2 scrubber repairs; prep for undocking Sunday

By WILLIAM HARWOOD
CBS News

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL--The shuttle Endeavour's crew helped out with repairs to one of the International Space Station's carbon dioxide scrubbers Saturday, packed up spacesuits and other EVA gear for return to Earth and transferred equipment and supplies to and from the lab complex as NASA's next-to-last shuttle mission moved into the home stretch of a 16-day mission.

At mission control in Houston, flight controllers marvled at spectacular photos of Endeavour and the International Space Station that were captured during a spacewalk Friday by astronauts Michael Fincke and Gregory Chamitoff:

http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=837172877-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

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Fincke and Chamitoff, both veterans of previous long-duration stays aboard the space station, spent the day Saturday replacing a CO2-absorbing cartridge, or bed, in one of the station's two U.S. carbon dioxide removal assemblies. The unit was pulled out of its rack in the Tranquility module earlier in the mission.

"One of the critical items we wanted to get repaired is the carbon dioxide removal assembly, or CDRA," said Flight Director Derek Hassmann. "It's a piece of hardware that wasn't necessarily engineered or designed to be repaired on orbit, but over the last several years we've had a number of different issues with the unit and we've come a long way in terms of our ability to repair CDRA on orbit."

Using the roomy Japanese Kibo laboratory, Fincke and Chamitoff worked through a complicated procedure to remove the CO2-absorbing cartridge and install a replacement.

"Everything went back where it was supposed to," Fincke reported toward the end of the crew's day. "We're very optimistic this is going to work out very nicely after we install it tomorrow."

"You guys have done a great job, we sure appreciate all the hard work you've done all day today," radioed Lucia McCullough from mission control.

"Like we said at the beginning of the day, we feel very honored ... to be treated like station crew members and getting the job done," Fincke said. "The can-do crew is back."

Fincke, veteran of two earlier long-duration stays aboard the space station, set a new U.S. record for space endurance Friday evening, chalking up his 377th day in orbit during three missions.

Fincke now stands at 20th on the list of most experienced space fliers behind 19 Russian cosmonauts led by Sergei Krikalev, who has logged 803 days in space during six missions. Assuming Endeavour lands Wednesday as planned, Fincke will pass cosmonaut Pavel Vinogradov and move into a tie with cosmonaut Valery Korzun for the 18th spot with 382 days off planet.

Along with work to repair the CDRA, the astronauts also prepared two spacesuits for transfer back to Endeavour and set up another for incoming station flight engineer Michael Fossum, scheduled to arrive aboard a Soyuz spacecraft next month.

"In addition to the CDRA work and transfer, we also did a lot of work in the joint airlock," Hassmann said. "One of the things we have to do on every shuttle mission is get the shuttle crew's spacesuits ready for return on the orbiter. For this particular mission, Drew Feustel and Mike Fincke are the designated astronauts who would perform (an emergency) spacewalk is one was required after undock. So one of the things we have to do toward the end of each of these missions is to prepare their spacesuits for return on the shuttle."

The astronauts were scheduled to go to bed just before noon EDT (GMT-4). Wakeup is planned for 7:56 p.m. The combined crews will work overnight to wrap up equipment and experiment transfers to the shuttle before holding a traditional farewell ceremony and closing hatches between the station and the shuttle shortly after 7 a.m.

If all goes well, Endeavour will undock just before midnight Sunday, setting up a landing back at the Kennedy Space Center around 2:35 a.m. Wednesday to close out the shuttle's 25th and final flight.

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CBS News Space Updates:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=837172879-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

NASA Shuttle Web:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=837172880-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

NASA Station Web:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=837172881-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

Spaceflight Now:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=837172882-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

GoogleSatTrack:
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CBS NEWS | Coming Up On CBS Sunday Morning: This Sunday: End of an era for the space shuttle, Mike Tyson and paying tribute.

The CBS Sunday Morning newsletter
COMING UP ON CBS SUNDAY MORNING    



   
Friday, the crew of the space shuttle Endeavor completed NASA's work on the International Space Station. In many ways, this second-to-last shuttle mission ushered in the beginning of an end of an era. As contributor David Pogue reports in this week's "Sunday Morning" cover story, not only is the shuttle program coming to a close, but the fate of the American manned space flight is now up in the air.
Pablo Picasso is indisputably one of the greatest artists of the 20th Century. His revolutionary style made him world renown. The muse behind much of his art was a 17- year-old girl he met outside a Paris department store in 1927, Marie Therese Walter. Correspondent Anthony Mason looks at the special relationship between Picasso and Walter and the inspiration she provided for some of his greatest works.
"The Book of Mormon" is the hottest show on Broadway. It is nominated for 14 Tony Awards and scalpers are selling tickets for as much as $900! That's not such a surprise when you consider two of the shows creators are also the brains behind the popular TV series "South Park." Correspondent Rita Braver gets a front row seat with the originators of Broadway's version of "The Book of Mormon" Trey Parker, Matt Stone and Bobby Lopez.
What's more American than apple pie? Many would argue the log cabin. Correspondent Mo Rocca heads up to the wilds of New Hampshire where he learns the intricacies of building an American icon.
Every Memorial Day, the graves of those who have served in the defense of our nation receive special attention. But few know of the special care that goes into making the tombstones that signify their sacrifice and final resting place. Correspondent Serena Altschul visits a quarry in Vermont, where only the finest marble is reserved for our nation's veterans.
Former boxer Mike Tyson has lived a checkered life. He's enjoyed great success as the heavyweight champion of the world and he's been the subject of ill repute because of his criminal actions, including a rape conviction. He is probably most notorious for taking a bite out of the ear of Evander Holyfield in a heavyweight bout. Today, Tyson says he is a changed man. Correspondent Bill Whitaker travels to the former champ's Las Vegas home to see if that is indeed true and what he finds may surprise you.
Those stories and more this "Sunday Morning." Listen for the trumpet.


RECENT SEGMENTS
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One dress changed Diane von Furstenberg's life The legendary designer is hot again - and says what she knows about design, women and life came from a simple wrap dress

Getting a grip on home product design High-performance, ergonomic products from Smart Design put a new twist on the common-place

MarketWatch | Weekly Roundup: The Week's Top 10 Videos

MarketWatch
Weekly Roundup
MAY 28, 2011

The week's top 10 videos on MarketWatch

By MarketWatch



In case you missed them, here are the 10 most popular videos that appeared on MarketWatch for the week of May 23-27:

How to grill like a top chef

Famed chef Rick Bayless offers a tour of the outdoor kitchen in the back yard of his Chicago home. Plus, Bayless, the man behind Chicago's Frontera Grill restaurant, offers his top grilling tips. Amy Hoak reports.
 Watch Video Report.


What are insiders doing?

May's correction affords an unparalleled opportunity to see what insiders really think is going to happen in the market, according to Mark Hulbert, who says it's pretty telling if they're selling amid declines. Laura Mandaro reports.
 Watch Video Report.


What are the largest hedge funds holding?

W.R. Grace, Potash Corp. and Viacom are among the top holdings of the world's largest hedge funds, according to Mazin Jadallah, founder and CEO of AlphaClone, who says the funds are overweight materials and also financials. Alistair Barr reports.
 Watch Video Report.


More men opting for plastic surgery

Laura Landro explains why more men are opting for plastic surgery and cosmetic dermatology procedures, from facelifts and liposuction to breast reductions and injectible fillers.
 Watch Video Report.


Could you get $2,000 in a pinch?

Few Americans could come up with $2,000 in 30 days if an unexpected emergency happened, like the recent tornados in the Midwest and South. Kelsey Hubbard talks with Phil Izzo about a new survey that shows just how financially fragile Americans really are.
 Watch Video Report.


Deadly Missouri tornado captured on video

Amateur video catches a massive twister as it rips through Joplin, Mo.
 Watch Video Report.


Experts explain how to buy a car

Walking into a dealership can be overwhelming. Here are some tips to steer you in the right direction.
 Watch Video Report.


Remembering CNBC's Mark Haines

Alan Murray and Jon Hilsenrath discuss their impressions of working with CNBC anchor Mark Haines, who died Tuesday evening at age 65.
 Watch Video Report.


Oprah departure brings seismic shift to daytime TV

Sam Schechner reports on changes facing daytime TV with Oprah Winfrey's departure from her daily talk show this week, along with Regis Philbin's departure later this year and a shift from soap operas to talks shows.
 Watch Video Report.


Evangelist admits Judgment Day error

Harold Camping, the evangelical broadcaster who predicted the world's end on May 21, says he got it wrong — but not completely.
 Watch Video Report.

NYT: Today's Headlines: Top News | Quotation of The Day | U.S | Opinion | World | U.S. | Political Memo | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | New York Region | Travel | Editorial | Op -ED | On This Day


Today's Headlines



TOP NEWS

Aid Pledge by Group of 8 Seeks to Bolster Arab Democracy

By LIZ ALDERMAN
The world's leading industrialized nations said they would help revive the economies of Egypt and Tunisia to help anchor stability in the region.

Saudi Arabia Scrambles to Limit Region's Upheaval

By NEIL MacFARQUHAR
Saudi Arabia is flexing its financial and diplomatic might in a bid to avert the overthrow of any more leaders in the Middle East.

Shale Boom in Texas Could Increase U.S. Oil Output

By CLIFFORD KRAUSS
Advocates of pulling oil from packed rock say it could raise the nation's oil output by 25 percent, but evidence is mounting that the extraction technique threatens water supplies.
QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"It's the one thing we have seen in our adult lives that could take us away from imported oil. What if we have found three of the world's biggest oil fields in the last three years right here in the U.S.? How transformative could that be for the U.S. economy?"
AUBREY McCLENDON, chief executive of Chesapeake Energy, an oil and gas producer that uses hydraulic fracturing.

U.S.

Interactive Feature: Panoramas of Joplin Before and After the Tornado

Interactive panoramas of devastation in two locations in Joplin, Mo., compared to images of the same locations before the storm.
Opinion
Op-Ed Contributor

Oprah, I Hardly Knew You

Four interviews later, she's still a mystery to me.
WORLD

Security Forces Restrained as Syrian Protests Spread

By NADA BAKRI
In a possible bid to keep down a rising death toll, security forces appeared to show restraint by not firing on demonstrations in some areas of the country.

At a Protest In Cairo, One Group Is Missing

By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK
For the first time since the Jan. 25 protest that kicked off the revolution, a street demonstration in Cairo took place without the Muslim Brotherhood.

Israel Waits and Worries Before Gaza Border Opening

By ETHAN BRONNER
The Israeli government did not issue a statement on Egypt's plans to open its border with Gaza, but some officials said they worried about weapons and militants flowing into the strip.
U.S.

A 911 Call That Can Help Save a Sirloin, and the Griller's Ego

By DIRK JOHNSON
Grill won't heat? In possession of a squirrel, and unsure how to cook it? A veteran of the Weber hot line center has heard it all.

Accustomed to Bad News, Joplin Chaplain Takes It Personally This Time

By MONICA DAVEY
Families of victims from Sunday's tornado have begun to receive death notifications, and for Bob Heath, a police chaplain, delivering the news is more difficult in his hometown.
Political Memo

A Republican Stays Connected in Democratic Massachusetts

By ABBY GOODNOUGH
No high-profile Democrat has emerged to take on Senator Scott P. Brown, a popular leader and the lone Republican in the state's Congressional delegation.
POLITICS

Senate Gadfly Who Isn't Shy About Buzzing

By JENNIFER STEINHAUER
Senator Rand Paul, a freshman Republican from Kentucky, has used tactics that have enraged both Democratic and G.O.P. leaders.

Texas Governor Hints at G.O.P. Run for White House

By JAMES C. McKINLEY Jr.
With a few offhand words, Gov. Rick Perry joined a list of Republican leaders who are testing the waters for 2012.

Judge Voids Ban on Campaign Donations by Business

By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE
The ruling drew from the Supreme Court's landmark decision last year that the government may not ban political spending by corporations in candidate elections.
BUSINESS

Goodbye Food Pyramid, Hello Dinner Plate

By WILLIAM NEUMAN
The new symbol, a plate, is meant to give consumers a fast, simple reminder of the basics of a healthy diet.

F.D.A. Approves Drug to Treat Hospital Scourge

By ANDREW POLLACK
The drug, called Dificid, is the first new medicine in 25 years approved to treat diarrhea caused by Clostridium difficile, a nasty and persistent bacterium.

Data Breach at Security Firm Linked to Attack on Lockheed

By CHRISTOPHER DREW and JOHN MARKOFF
Lockheed Martin experienced computer network disruptions that could be tied to a hacking attack earlier this year on a supplier of security tokens.
TECHNOLOGY

Giving to Charity by Managing Your E-Mail

By STEPHANIE STROM
GiveBackMail donates money to a charity chosen by you when you send or delete an e-mail through its Web site.

Sony Chief Still in Search of a Turnaround

By HIROKO TABUCHI and BROOKS BARNES
Howard Stringer's efforts at Sony have been stymied by the effects of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, a hacker attack on the PlayStation network and other troubles.

Google Unveils App for Paying With Phone

By TARA SIEGEL BERNARD
Google introduced a mobile application that allows consumers to make a payment by waving their cellphones at a retailer's terminal rather than pulling out a credit card.
SPORTS
Mariners 4, Yankees 3

Yankees Start Trip With Loss in Seattle

By BEN SHPIGEL
The bullpen implodes and the offense goes quiet as the Mariners rally for a 4-3 win.
Phillies 6, Mets 4

Wright Is Magnanimous; Bullpen Is Too Generous

By DAVID WALDSTEIN
Before succumbing to the Phillies, the Mets heard good news: David Wright isn't holding a grudge, and he and Ike Davis are close to returning.
Bruins 1, Lightning 0

By Smallest of Margins, Bruins Seal Finals Spot

By JEFF Z. KLEIN
The Boston Bruins earned a berth in the Stanley Cup finals with a 1-0 victory over the Tampa Bay Lightning on Friday night in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference finals.
ARTS

A Storybook Ascent for One Actress

By PATRICIA COHEN
Nina Arianda, nominated for a best actress Tony for "Born Yesterday," has screeched, pouted and purred her way to roles in film and on Broadway.

Decoding Woody Allen's 'Midnight in Paris'

By JOSEPH BERGER
Paris in the 1920s, as portrayed in Woody Allen's "Midnight in Paris," was fertile ground for art, literature and complicated relationships, decrypted here.
Critic's Notebook

In the Hip-Hop World, Blogs Mean Business

By JON CARAMANICA
Rick Ross and his new crew exemplify the modern way of getting attention in the hip-hop world.
NEW YORK / REGION

Too Young for Kindergarten? Tide Turning Against 4-Year-Olds

By WINNIE HU
Connecticut is considering holding back students born after Oct. 1, a process known as redshirting, so they won't be overwhelmed by peers who have already turned 5.

Reacting to Police Rape Case With Anger, but Little Surprise

By JOHN LELAND
The acquittal of Franklin L. Mata and Kenneth Morena, police officers charged with sexual assault, elicited emotions ranging from outrage to resignation among city residents.

2010 Was Big-Spending Year Even by Mayor's Standards, Documents Suggest

By MICHAEL BARBARO
Even by the high standards of Michael R. Bloomberg, 2010 was a year of conspicuous consumption and charity, according to tax documents revealed on Friday.
TRAVEL

Lake Geneva as Shelley and Byron Knew It

By TONY PERROTTET
When the two Romantic poets descended on Switzerland's Lake Geneva in 1816, the plan was poetry and pleasure. The result? Frankenstein, vampires and a love child.
Journeys

In Former Soviet Georgia, Two Families and the Art of Hospitality

By CLIFFORD J. LEVY
Lavish homegrown meals are just one aspect of a three-day stay with a family in the Georgian wine village of Tsinandali.
36 Hours

36 Hours in Niagara Falls

By BARBARA IRELAND
In Canada you get views and hooplah; in New York, quiet exploration. To get the best of both Niagaras, hop back and forth.
EDITORIALS
Editorial

A New Flood, Some Old Truths

The Mississippi tells us, again, to change the way we manage water.
Editorial

Another War in Sudan?

A dispute over the region of Abyei must not spin out of control.
Editorial

Dodd-Frank in Limbo

The White House should nominate qualified leaders to fill positions created by the reforms, and then fight for them.
Editorial

Albany Needs Ethics Reform - Now

Gov. Andrew Cuomo has been in office five months, and we're still waiting for an ethics reform bill.
OP-ED
Op-Ed Columnist

The Coyote Candidate

By GAIL COLLINS
In this week's session of the presidential primary book club, we're discussing Gov. Rick Perry of Texas.
Op-Ed Columnist

Endangered Ryan-os

By CHARLES M. BLOW
Democrats aim at a Republican weak spot.
Op-Ed Columnist

Don't Scorn Paul Ryan

By JOE NOCERA
However wrongheaded his Medicare plan, at least he's facing the problem.
ON THIS DAY
On May 28, 1984, President Reagan led a state funeral at Arlington National Cemetery for an unidentified American soldier killed in the Vietnam War.