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May 22, 2011

GATA | THE GATA DISPATCH: Gold reserves are just for market rigging, so sell them all



12:57p ET Sunday, May 22, 2011

Dear Friend of GATA and Gold:

U.S. Rep. Ron Paul, the leading critic of the Federal Reserve and leading advocate of returning the United States to a gold standard, has sparked more controversy for his comment to the New York Sun last week that the United States should sell its gold reserves:
http://www.nysun.com/national/selling-gold-at-fort-knox-emerges-as-next-...
Some people wonder whether the real objective of Paul's comment was to ease the way for an audit of those reserves, long another of his policy objectives. After all, the gold couldn't be sold until there was some official determination of how much there really is and how much of it has been encumbered by the gold swap arrangements GATA's lawsuit against the Fed prompted the Fed to acknowledge in 2009, if only inadvertently:
http://www.gata.org/files/GATAFedResponse-09-17-2009.pdf
Market analyst Gary North writes that while few people in the gold community are coming to Paul's defense, he endorses Paul's call for selling the gold reserves, provided the gold is minted into American eagle coins and sold to the public from which some of it was taken in 1933:
http://www.garynorth.com/public/8028.cfm
But Paul really isn't alone in urging liquidation of the U.S. gold reserve. GATA and the delegates to its Gold Rush 21 conference in Dawson City, Yukon Territory, Canada, in August 2005 issued a statement calling for the open dishoarding of all central bank gold reserves except for metal necessary for coinage:
http://www.gata.org/node/4350
That statement, the Dawson Declaration, presumed that the highest objective in the world's economic liberation is to get governments out of the business of rigging markets and particularly the gold market, for without gold reserves to bomb the markets with at strategic moments, such rigging would become difficult to impossible.
As the Reserve Bank of Australia acknowledged in its annual report in 2003, "Foreign currency reserve assets and gold are held primarily to support intervention in the foreign exchange market":
http://www.rba.gov.au/publications/annual-reports/rba/2003/pdf/2003-repo...
That acknowledgement can be found on Page 31 of the RBA's annaul report, Page 33 of the PDF version at the Internet link above.
But this issue may be largely academic anyway. By the time central banks talk openly of selling their gold, they probably have already lost most of it through surreptitious sales or leasing.
That is certainly the evidence of the supposed Western European central bank gold sales of the last decade. Despite constant announcements of such sales, including sales by the International Monetary Fund, the gold price rose steadily and even dramatically. How could the gold price rise if central banks kept bombing the gold market? Perhaps only because those sales were not delivering new metal to the market at all but rather just constituting the cash settlement of gold leases whose gold could not be recovered without causing a catastrophic short squeeze and exploding the gold price.
The evidence of the last decade is that central bank gold sales are nothing for gold investors to fear -- that they signify the weakness of central banks, not strength. And now that central banks outside the U.S.-European market-rigging alliance are openly adding to their gold reserves, diversifying out of the U.S. dollar, the world reserve currency, gold investors and free-market advocates might respond to hints of U.S. gold sales with Clint Eastwood's famous dare: Go ahead. Make our day.
CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee Inc.

 Join GATA here:
World Resource Investment Conference
Sunday-Monday, June 5-6, 2011
Vancouver Convention Centre East
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Financial & Forex Info | The Australian Capital Circle: Make it hurt, PM told




Capital Circle Newsletter
Make it hurt, PM told
 
A new climate change report and a push for an inquiry into immigration detention will dominate the parliamentary agenda today.

The PM's Diary: Julia Gillard is in Canberra as the parliamentary sitting fortnight begins. She will receive a report, The Critical Decade, from Australian Climate Commission's Tim Flannery and Will Steffen at 9.30am (more below). At 10.30am she will attend an event at the University of Canberra.
Tony Abbott is in Canberra for the return of parliament. He is in meetings this morning and may hold a media event later today.
Climate shift: Regular readers will recall Greg Combet has hired SMH veteran Mark Davis as his new message manager. But Capital Circle has learned the changes in the Climate Change portfolio run deeper. Subho Banerjee, who has worked in the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet and Noel Pearson's Cape York Institute has been appointed a deputy secretary in Mr Combet's department. And Nick Rowley, ex-policy guru for NSW Premier Bob Carr and British PM Tony Blair is now assistant director of communications in the department. Mr Combet's office has been firing off rapid reaction press releases to combat Tony Abbott's campaign against the carbon tax of late. Perhaps the combined influence of Banerjee, Rowley and Davis is starting to show?
Appointed: Ex-Age journo Lyall Johnson has replaced Suzie Brady as Communications Minister Stephen Conroy's message manager.
Factional alignment: Nathan Lambert will be appointed assistant national ALP secretary in the coming weeks. The deal has been done and is expected to be ticked off at the next meeting of the national executive on June 16th. Lambert is currently assistant state secretary in Victoria.
Probing: Senators have long days and late nights ahead over the next fortnight as estimates begin today. Up first are Environment and Communications, Finance and Public Administration, Legal and Constitutional Affairs and Rural Af
Read more...

Financial & Forex Info | The Australian Business Briefing: Private equity takes on taxman



 
Private equity takes on taxman
ATO Susannah Moran ONE of the world's biggest private equity players in the mining industry is taking on the Australian Taxation Office.
 
Waratah writedown tests Fenn's mettle
Grant Fenn Tracy Lee FEW would doubt Grant Fenn had unwittingly tucked into the proverbial brown sandwich when he rose to the chief executive role at Downer EDI.
 
Gas price rise prompts Cooper Basin revamp
Cooper Basin Matt Chambers SANTOS is gearing up to breathe new life into its onshore Cooper Basin gasfields.
 
Online retailer catches Packer funding
CathOfTheDay Damon Kitney An online retail group backed by James Packer and one of the world's largest hedge funds expects to double revenue and profit over the next two years.
 
US, Europe to hit bourse
Shares Blair Speedy THE sharemarket is tipped to open lower today after three weeks of falls on Wall Street as downgrades and sovereign debt issues spook investors.
 
Retailers' 'aid poor farmers'
Coles Blair Speedy WOOLWORTHS and Coles have hit back at claims they are hurting suppliers in developing countries by holding them to strict environmental standards.
 
Austrade shifts its focus
austrade Glenda Korporaal AUSTRADE chief executive Peter Grey is used to the complex world of international trade negotiations after a career as a senior trade diplomat.
 
Elders tipped to post $20m loss
Elders Blair Speedy ELDERS is expected to post a net loss of $20 million for the first half today as a result of writedowns and the impact of cyclone and flood damage.
 
Financial Markets
Online retailer catches Packer funding
CathOfTheDay Damon Kitney An online retail group backed by James Packer and one of the world's largest hedge funds expects to double revenue and profit over the next two years.
 
US, Europe to hit bourse
Waratah writedown tests Fenn's mettle
 
Financial Markets Coverage
 
Mining & Energy
Baffinland deposit 'better than Pilbara'
Iron ore Geoff Hiscock Global steelmaker ArcelorMittal hopes to start developing a rich iron ore deposit in Canada that it says is better than WA's Pilbara region.
 
China demand keeps gold soaring
AGL facing wait for payday
 
More Mining & Energy Coverage


CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News: 430p 5/22 CORRECTION: Space station change of command on eve of Soyuz departure

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News

-- Posted at 11:55 AM EDT, 05/22/11: Space station change of command on eve of Soyuz departure
-- CORRECTED at 04:30 PM EDT, 05/22/11: Fixing Andrey Borisenko's first name in second graf

By WILLIAM HARWOOD
CBS News/Kennedy Space Center

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL--A little more than an hour after a spacewalk by two shuttle astronauts, the crew of the International Space Station held a change-of-command ceremony to mark the departure Monday of Expedition 27 commander Dmitry Kondratyev, Italian astronaut Paolo Nespoli and NASA astronaut Catherine "Cady" Coleman.

Floating in the Japanese Kibo laboratory module, Kondratyev handed over command to cosmonaut Andrey Borisenko, who will head up the Expedition 28 crew when Kondratyev, Nespoli and Coleman undock in their Soyuz TMA-20 spacecraft Monday evening and head back to Earth to close out a 159-day stay in space.

"Houston, thank you all for great help and support and looking forward to working with you again," Kondratyev radioed after the brief ceremony. "Thanks a lot."

Departing at 5:35 p.m. EDT (GMT-4) Monday, an hour-and-a-half earlier than usual, Kondratyev plans to back away from the lab complex and then briefly halt while the space station executes a slow turn to set up a one-of-a-kind photo opportunity. Nespoli, working in the Soyuz forward habitation module, plans to capture the only photos and video ever shot showing the space station from a distance with a shuttle attached.

Borisenko and his two station crewmates -- NASA astronaut Ronald Garan and cosmonaut Alexander Samokutyaev -- will form the core of the station's 28th long-duration crew. Three fresh crew members -- Soyuz TMA-02M commander Sergei Volkov, Michael Fossum and Satoshi Furukawa -- are scheduled for launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on June 7, arriving at the space station two days later.

GATA | THE GATA DISPATCH: Weekly metals review, Rule, and Hathaway up at King World News


11:50p ET Saturday, May 21, 2011

Dear Friend of GATA and Gold (and Silver):

On the weekly precious metals review at King World News, Bill Haynes of CMI Gold & Silver says silver's correction isn't that big a deal in the broader context of its bull market, while market analyst Dan Norcini of JSMineSet.com (also http://www.traderdannorcini.blogspot.com/) remarks on the recent volatility in the gold and silver markets, adding that the big commercial traders have the smallest short position since May 2009. You can listen to the interviews at King World News here:
http://kingworldnews.com/kingworldnews/Broadcast/Entries/2011/5/21_KWN_W...
Meanwhile, the recent King World News interview with Rick Rule of Global Resource Investments can be heard here:
http://kingworldnews.com/kingworldnews/Broadcast/Entries/2011/5/21_Rick_...
And the recent King World News interview with the Tocqueville Gold Fund's John Hathaway can be heard here:
http://kingworldnews.com/kingworldnews/Broadcast/Entries/2011/5/21_John_...
CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee Inc.

Join GATA here:
World Resource Investment Conference
Sunday-Monday, June 5-6, 2011
Vancouver Convention Centre East
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

http://cambridgehouse.com/conference-details/world-resource-investment-c...

Gold Rush 2011
GATA's London Conference
Thursday-Saturday, August 4-6, 2011
Savoy Hotel, London, England

http://www.gatagoldrush.com

Support GATA by purchasing gold and silver commemorative coins:

https://www.amsterdamgold.eu/gata/index.asp?BiD=12
Or by purchasing a colorful GATA T-shirt:
http://gata.org/tshirts
Or a colorful poster of GATA's full-page ad in The Wall Street Journal on January 31, 2009:
http://gata.org/node/wallstreetjournal
Or a video disc of GATA's 2005 Gold Rush 21 conference in the Yukon:
http://www.goldrush21.com/
Help keep GATA going
GATA is a civil rights and educational organization based in the United States and tax-exempt under the U.S. Internal Revenue Code. Its e-mail dispatches are free, and you can subscribe at:
http://www.gata.org
To contribute to GATA, please visit:
http://www.gata.org/node/16
... Dispatch continues below ...

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News: 1155a 5/22 Update: Space station change of command on eve of Soyuz departure

11:55 AM EDT, 05/22/11: Space station change of command on eve of Soyuz departure

By WILLIAM HARWOOD
CBS News/Kennedy Space Center

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL--A little more than an hour after a spacewalk by two shuttle astronauts, the crew of the International Space Station held a change-of-command ceremony to mark the departure Monday of Expedition 27 commander Dmitry Kondratyev, Italian astronaut Paolo Nespoli and NASA astronaut Catherine "Cady" Coleman.

Floating in the Japanese Kibo laboratory module, Kondratyev handed over command to cosmonaut Alexander Borisenko, who will head up the Expedition 28 crew when Kondratyev, Nespoli and Coleman undock in their Soyuz TMA-20 spacecraft Monday evening and head back to Earth to close out a 159-day stay in space.

"Houston, thank you all for great help and support and looking forward to working with you again," Kondratyev radioed after the brief ceremony. "Thanks a lot."

Departing at 5:35 p.m. EDT (GMT-4) Monday, an hour-and-a-half earlier than usual, Kondratyev plans to back away from the lab complex and then briefly halt while the space station executes a slow turn to set up a one-of-a-kind photo opportunity. Nespoli, working in the Soyuz forward habitation module, plans to capture the only photos and video ever shot showing the space station from a distance with a shuttle attached.

Borisenko and his two station crewmates -- NASA astronaut Ronald Garan and cosmonaut Alexander Samokutyaev -- will form the core of the station's 28th long-duration crew. Three fresh crew members -- Soyuz TMA-02M commander Sergei Volkov, Michael Fossum and Satoshi Furukawa -- are scheduled for launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on June 7, arriving at the space station two days later.

=================================

CBS News Space Updates:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=831231574-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

NASA Shuttle Web:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=831231576-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

NASA Station Web:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=831231577-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

Spaceflight Now:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=831231578-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

GoogleSatTrack:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=831231579-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News1020a 5/22 Update: Spacewalk No. 2 ends

By WILLIAM HARWOOD
CBS News/Kennedy Space Center

10:20 AM EDT, 05/22/11 Update: Spacewalk No. 2 ends

Astronauts Michael Fincke and Andrew Feustel began repressurizing the space station's Quest airlock at 10:12 a.m. EDT, officially ending a marathon eight-hour seven-minute spacewalk. The astronauts accomplish both of their primary objectives, recharging a solar array coolant system with ammonia and lubricating a solar array drive mechanism.

But trouble with bolts holding thermal covers in place on the solar alpha rotary joint mechanism put the crew behind schedule and in the end, only three of the four covers were re-installed. One was brought back to the airlock for a more detailed examination inside the station.

"Guys, congratulations, that was an awesome EVA," spacewalk coordinator Gregory Chamitoff radioed. "That was a lot of hard work and a lot of training leading up to this and you guys did really, really great. I'm proud to be part of your team."

"Thanks, Greg. Couldn't have done it without you, buddy," Fincke replied.

This was the 157th spacewalk devoted to station assembly and maintenance since construction began in 1998, the sixth so far this year and the second for the Endeavour astronauts. Total station EVA time now stands at 988 hours and 19 minutes while the total for Endeavour's mission is 14 hours and 26 minutes. Feustel, completing his fifth spacewalk, has now logged 35 hours and 24 minutes of EVA time, moving him up to 30th on the list of most experience spacewalkers. Fincke, completing his seventh excursion, has now logged 34 hours and 19 minutes, moving up to 32nd.

=================================

CBS News Space Updates:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=831222622-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

NASA Shuttle Web:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=831222623-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

NASA Station Web:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=831222624-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

Spaceflight Now:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=831222625-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

GoogleSatTrack:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=831222626-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News: 920a 5/22 Update: Astronauts complete drive gear lubrication, cover installation

By WILLIAM HARWOOD
CBS News/Kennedy Space Center

09:20 AM EDT, 05/22/11 Update: Astronauts complete drive gear lubrication, cover installation

Astronauts Andrew Feustel and Michael Fincke have completed lubrication of a massive solar array drive gear and re-installation of three thermal covers, the final task planned for today's spacealk. A fourth cover will be brought back inside the International Space Station for an examination after problems with retention washers that allowed at least one bolt to float away earlier.

Flight controllers have decided decontamination procedures will not be required for Feustel. While he was in the vicinity of an ammonia vent line during earlier work to recharge a solar array coolant system, controllers have concluded there is little likelihood that any trapped ammonia ice on his spacesuit could have survived the extended spacewalk. As a result, there is no need for a 30-minute "bake-out" procedure. But controllers are still discussing whether any testing is required to make sure.

As of 9:20 a.m. EDT, spacewalk duration stood at seven hours and 15 minutes. The astronauts are in the process of collecting tools and equipment before making their way back to the Quest airlock module.

=================================

CBS News Space Updates:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=831217168-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

NASA Shuttle Web:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=831217169-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

NASA Station Web:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=831217170-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

Spaceflight Now:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=831217171-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

GoogleSatTrack:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=831217172-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News: 08:30 AM EDT, 05/22/11 Update: Astronauts in home stretch of marathon spacewalk

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News

By WILLIAM HARWOOD
CBS News/Kennedy Space Center

08:30 AM EDT, 05/22/11 Update: Astronauts in home stretch of marathon spacewalk

Running almost an hour and a half behind schedule, astronauts Andrew Feustel and Michael Fincke have completed work to lubricate the snares in a Canadian robot arm attachment and to mount coolant system radiator stowage beams to the International Space Station's power truss. The spacewalkers are making their way back to the left-side solar array drive mechanism to complete work to lubricate a bearing race to reduce long-term wear and tear.

It is not yet clear whether the astronauts will have time to re-install thermal covers over the solar alpha rotary joint that were removed earlier to provide access to the drive gear. Problems with loose bolts in the covers put the crew behind schedule earlier. That lost time, plus another half hour that may be needed to make sure Feustel's spacesuit wasn't contaminated by ammonia coolant during earlier work to recharge the reservoir in a solar array, could add an hour or more to the EVA's duration.

Flight controllers are still assessing whether decontamination procedures will be required for Feustel because of his proximity to an ammonia vent line. If decontamination is required, the spacewalkers likely will not reinstall the four SARJ thermal covers and the work will be deferred to a future excursion.

=================================

CBS News Space Updates:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=831215987-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

NASA Shuttle Web:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=831215988-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

NASA Station Web:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=831215989-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

Spaceflight Now:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=831215990-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

GoogleSatTrack:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=831215991-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

NYT: Today's Headlines: Top News | Quotation of The Day | Sports | World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | New York Region | Magazine | Editorials | OP-ED | On This Day



TOP NEWS

Promise of Arab Uprisings Is Threatened by Divisions

By ANTHONY SHADID and DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK
From Egypt to Syria, tensions over religion and clans have threatened uprisings that once seemed to promise a new sense of national identity built on the idea of citizenship.

The Gossip Machine, Churning Out Cash

By JIM RUTENBERG
Stars and dimmer lights deal in a world of dirt and money, and not always unwillingly.

Need Therapy? A Good Man Is Hard to Find

By BENEDICT CAREY
Mental health care is a profession increasingly dominated by women, giving rise to concern that some men in need of help may go without.
QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"We are not 'we' yet."
TONY DAOUD, an activist in Lebanon, on the Arab world's fractured sense of identity.

Sports

Slide Show: Preakness Replay, May 21

A look back at Shackleford's victory at the 136th Preakness Stakes.
Opinion
Op-Chart | Ben Schott

The actors who, since Jimmy Carter, have strutted and fretted their hour upon the world.
WORLD

In the Golan Heights, Anxious Eyes Look East

By ISABEL KERSHNER
For the roughly 20,000 Arabs of the Druze religious sect who live in the Israeli-controlled Golan Heights, this is Syrian territory.

Syrians Are Fatally Shot At Funeral for Protesters

By NADA BAKRI
Security forces shot and killed at least five people and wounded several others in a funeral procession for eight protesters who died Friday.

Old Soviet Nuclear Site in Asia Has Unlikely Sentinel: The U.S.

By ELLEN BARRY
Western scientists are aiming to keep terrorists away from debris the Soviets left behind during their atomic tests, with the fear that the materials could be used for nuclear devices.
U.S.

Behind Grass-Roots School Advocacy, Bill Gates

By SAM DILLON
Bill Gates's foundation is financing bands of educators to pose alternatives to union orthodoxies on issues like the seniority system and the use of student test scores to evaluate teachers.

Record Snowpacks Could Threaten Western States

By KIRK JOHNSON and JESSE McKINLEY
Winter snows piled up on mountain ranges throughout the West will now melt - mildly if weather conditions are just right, catastrophically if they are not.

With Withdrawal Looming, Trails Grow Cold for Americans Missing in Iraq

By JACK HEALY
The fates of eight American men are a haunting piece of unfinished business that the military will leave behind when it withdraws by the end of the year.
POLITICS

Freshman Democrats in the House Bond Over Policy and Egg Rolls

By JENNIFER STEINHAUER
The nine new Democrats in the House have tried to stave off marginalization by working hard on the needs of their districts.

New Mexico Judge Charged in Bribery Case, but Former Governor Draws a Mention

By MARC LACEY
Former Gov. Bill Richardson said suggestions that he handed out judicial appointments based on campaign contributions were "outrageous and defamatory."

A Doctor's Push for Single-Payer Health Care for All Finds Traction in Vermont

By ABBY GOODNOUGH
Gov. Peter Shumlin still has to figure out how much the plan will cost and how to pay for it - and whether he will still be in charge by 2017.
BUSINESS

It Teetered, It Tottered, It Was Bound to Fall Down

By GRETCHEN MORGENSON and JOSHUA ROSNER
NovaStar Financial was a microcosm of the home-lending assembly line that would set the stage for the credit crisis of 2008, the new book "Reckless Endangerment" says.

Guard Dog to the Stars (Legally Speaking)

By MICHAEL CIEPLY
Martin Singer and his law firm have emerged as the foremost protectors of celebrities, including Charlie Sheen.
DealBook

Grassley Investigating Trades Made by SAC Capital

By PETER LATTMAN
Senator Charles E. Grassley, Republican of Iowa, is examining 20 stock trades by the hedge fund SAC Capital Advisors, a spokesman for the lawmaker said Saturday.
TECHNOLOGY
The Haggler

A Rave, a Pan, or Just a Fake?

By DAVID SEGAL
Paid reviewers may post fake positive or negative opinions of businesses on consumer Web sites like Yelp, which is aiming to fight the problem.
Unboxed

Change the World, and Win Fabulous Prizes

By STEVE LOHR
The Internet is revitalizing an old stalwart in the innovation game: the prize as incentive.

City Dwellers With Time to Kill

By JED LIPINSKI
A hunting game that can offer big prizes, or big bar tabs, is alluring to bar patrons with time to kill.
SPORTS

Lionel Messi: Boy Genius

By JERÉ LONGMAN
Messi is an agile, darting virtuoso tethered to a soccer ball with an almost preternatural sense of the field.
Yankees 7, Mets 3

Yanks Feast on Mets Pitching, Belting 4 Homers Off Capuano

By BEN SHPIGEL
Using four home runs for six of their seven runs, the Yankees got a measure of revenge after losing the opener of the Subway Series.
Mavericks 93, Thunder 87

Mavericks Almost Blow a 22-Point Lead

By TOM SPOUSTA
Patience and experience resulted in a six-point victory for the Mavericks, whose adjustments on defense finally bore fruit.
ARTS

Even Offstage, Lady Gaga's Ready for the Stage

By JON PARELES
Lady Gaga, the self-described "show without an intermission," recorded her new album, "Born This Way," arriving on Tuesday, while on the road.

Spidey Syndrome Invades the Opera

By CHARLES ISHERWOOD
The Broadway musical and opera inhabit distant cultural spheres, but two recent productions represented a notable - and unfortunate - point of contact.

Notes of a Screenwriter, Mad as Hell

By DAVE ITZKOFF
The screenwriter Paddy Chayefsky left behind a large cache of his notes for his incendiary, Oscar-winning script for "Network."
NEW YORK / REGION

The Last Jam Session

By DANIEL J. WAKIN
For decades, musicians have used a dank basement on the Lower East Side as a rehearsal studio. Now, the building has been cited for violations, and they are being evicted.

The Defense Can't Afford to Rest

By ALAN FEUER
With the economic downturn and well-paying clients harder to find, lawyers appointed to defend the poor say they are struggling, and fear a Bloomberg plan may affect their livelihood.
Bookshelf

A Case That Put a System on Trial

By SAM ROBERTS
Books revisit the Central Park jogger case, examine the role of the health department and make city zoning understandable.
MAGAZINE

We Are All Teenage Werewolves

By ALEX PAPPADEMAS
Every culture has told some version of the wolfman story. But can a souped-up, sexed-up MTV werewolf win over a generation that takes its monsters very, very seriously?

Sing for Your Life

By DANIEL BERGNER
Imagine if there were an "American Idol" just for opera. Actually, there is.

The Hot-Money Cowboys of Baghdad

By STEVEN LEE MYERS
Iraq is still very dangerous, though not dangerous enough to scare off investors with an appetite for risk.
EDITORIALS
Editorial

Malign Neglect

In declining a case brought by torture victims, the Supreme Court undermined the rule of law.
Editorial

Haunted by Their Medicare Vote

In Western New York and elsewhere, Republicans struggle to defend their extreme Medicare plan.
Editorial | The Rural Life

Tomorrow to Pastures New

By VERLYN KLINKENBORG
I wonder what my horses will feel when they find themselves turned loose in a pasture they've spent such a long time contemplating.
OP-ED
Op-Ed Contributor

Was It Something I Wrote?

By VALERY PANYUSHKIN
The dangers and disappointments of life as a Russian journalist.
Op-Ed Columnist

The Irish Find What They're Looking For

By MAUREEN DOWD
It takes a village to welcome a president. It takes a country to forgive a monarchy.
Op-Ed Columnist

They Shoot Horses, Don't They?

By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
The Syrian regime that has been so accustomed to being in control is getting a taste of what it's like to lose it.
Op-Ed Columnist

Religion and Sex Quiz

By NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF
Think you know what the Bible says about social issues like abortion and same-sex marriage? Take this quiz and let's see.
Op-Ed Contributor

Our Irrational Fear of Forgetting

By MARGARET MORGANROTH GULLETTE
In our hypercognitive society, fear of memory loss has made deep inroads into the psyche.
Op-Ed Contributor

Bin Laden's Gone. Can My Son Come Home?

By FRANK R. LINDH
John Walker Lindh was a scapegoat, wrongly accused of terrorism at a moment when our grieving country needed someone to blame.
Op-Ed Contributor

Not Going to the Chapel

By RICH BENJAMIN
Gays should boycott straight weddings.
ON THIS DAY
On May 22, 1947, the Truman Doctrine was enacted as Congress appropriated military and economic aid for Greece and Turkey.