Translate

Search This Blog

Search Tool




May 1, 2011

The Washington Post Breaking News Alert: Obama to make an undisclosed statement late tonight |


Breaking News Alert: White House says Obama to make late-night statement Sunday on an undisclosed topic
May 1, 2011 10:24:16 PM
----------------------------------------

The White House says President Obama is making a late-night statement but is not announcing the topic that he will discuss. Officials say the statement could come as early as 10:30 p.m. Watch the address live at http://www.washingtonpost.com/postlive1

http://link.email.washingtonpost.com/r/ZTVJ68/YH0K3R/ZCS3SJ/S46PYH/19D2S/KI/h

For more information, visit washingtonpost.com

Flash Crash for Silver : Asia Week Ahead | U.S. Market Outlook



Flash crash for silver
Silver, gold drop sharply, but volume reported light

Asia's week ahead | Asian markets news

Rate decisions due Indian, Australian central banks will hold policy meetings, reports MarketWatch's Phani Kumar. • India expected to raise interest rates again • Thai economy's challenges • Chinese inflation eases in April • South Korean exports stronger than expected Little aid for India's poor Critics say jobs program for millions of poorest citizens is ineffective, riddled with corruption. • Playing other side of Australian mining boom. 

Silver prices plunge by 12% in 11 minutes by one count before beginning to pull back higher.
Japan stocks rally | Australian shares higher

U.S. markets outlook
Jobs report may shed light
The prevailing view among economists that U.S. growth will accelerate over the next few months will get tested this week with the crucial jobs report.
Jobs, manufacturing data to share stage
Stocks to watch: Anadarko, Humana, more
U.S. week ahead | View from NYSE


investing | Investing news and tips
Mix and mismatch
New funds and top managers may not always be a winning combination. MarketWatch's Chuck Jaffe says caution is necessary.
Saefong: $50 silver price screams caution
Howard Gold: Silver fever about to break
Downside targets for silver (Minyanville)
Betting on oil's ongoing rally

Financial & Forex Info | The Australian Business Briefing | Rio tips prices to take a dive







 Update for Mon May 02 08:12:54 EST 2011


Rio tips prices to take a dive
Jan Du Plessis EXCLUSIVE: Matt Chambers SOARING commodity prices are unsustainable and Rio Tinto will maintain a strong balance sheet to insulate it from any future volatility.
Buffett admits mistakes in stock scandal
Warren Buffett WARREN BUFFETT has told Berkshire Hathaway shareholders the company has been battered by a trusted former employee's misdeeds and a string of natural disasters.
Debt has become 'the new equity'
Ric Stowe Richard Gluyas THE good news is that investors in Ric Stowe's Griffin Coal are finally starting to clean up.
ASX pushes ahead with search for chief
Aus Bus Pix Robert Elstone ASX CEO Tracy Lee THE ASX has appointed an executive search firm to assist in identifying a replacement for outgoing chief Robert Elstone.
Tough talk expected from RBA
RBA Katherine Jimenez TOUGHER language could be on the cards from the Reserve Bank of Australia tomorrow, despite interest rates being left on hold.
Eyes on Orica's expansion
Orica Tracy Lee THE market will be closely watching the half-year financial results of explosives maker Orica today.
ANZ profit set to jump 22pc
anz Richard Gluyas ANZ kicks off the major-bank interim profit reporting season tomorrow with an expected 22 per cent jump in cash profit to $2.8 billion.
Sales outlook remains gloomy
clouds Teresa Ooi MANY businesses remain concerned about their sales and profit outlook over the next 12 months, the PwC private business barometer finds.
Financial Markets
Australian dollar just shy of $US1.10
dollar THE Australian dollar was higher today, just short of the $US1.10 mark, as the US currency weakened further against most major currencies.
ASX pushes ahead with search for chief
Debt has become 'the new equity'
Financial Markets Coverage
Mining & Energy
Origin in energy for long haul
Origin Energy Matt Chambers ORIGIN Energy chief Grant King says the two biggest steps taken by the firm in his 11 years in charge have happened in the past five months.
Rio tips prices to take a dive
Debt has become 'the new equity'
More Mining & Energy Coverage





CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News: Updated at 04:30 PM, 05/01/11: Launch delayed to at least May 8; news conference; quotes and details

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News

-- Posted at 09:45 AM, 05/01/11: Avionics swap-out ordered; shuttle launch on hold
-- Updated at 10:15 AM, 05/01/11: Shuttle crew flies back to Houston; adding quote
-- Updated at 04:30 PM, 05/01/11: Launch delayed to at least May 8; news conference; quotes and details

By WILLIAM HARWOOD
CBS News

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL--Engineers have traced an electrical problem blamed for grounding the shuttle Endeavour Friday to an avionics box in the ship's engine compartment, officials said Sunday. Replacing the box will delay launch until at least May 8 -- Mother's Day -- and possibly later.

"I'm here to disappoint everybody by saying I'm not going to tell you what the new launch date is because I have no idea," MIke Moses, chairman of NASA's Mission Management Team, told reporters after engineers decided on a course of action. "We have a lot to evaluate, both the work to do, the R & R (removal and replacement), the retest that has to be done, how we work all that schedule in.

"But we can tell you pretty much it's not going to be any earlier than the 8th. That doesn't mean we're going to go launch on the 8th, that just means we know right now the 8th is our next available opening."

Earlier Sunday, engineers held out a slight hope of possibly launching Endeavour a day or two earlier if the Air Force would agree to delay the planned May 6 launch of an Atlas 5 rocket carrying a missile early warning satellite. But given the amount of work required to repair the shuttle, that was not a viable scenario.

Launch Director Mike Leinbach said engineers plan to remove the suspect aft load control assembly -- ALCA-2 -- box from Endeavour's cramped engine compartment Monday, install a replacement Tuesday and get into a complex re-test procedure Tuesday night or early Wednesday.

To make a launch at 12:09:17 p.m. EDT (GMT-4) on Sunday, NASA would have to start a fresh three-day countdown around 10:30 a.m. Thursday. Whether the team can complete the ALCA-2 swap-out and re-test in time remains to be seen.

But if Endeavour does not make May 8, launch likely would move to May 10. A launch on May 9 could result in the shuttle undocking from the International Space Station on May 23, the same day a Russian Soyuz crew ferry craft is scheduled to depart. There are no known conflicts for subsequent launch opportunities.

In the meantime, "the team is upbeat," Leinbach said. "A little disappointed, of course, that we couldn't launch. But responding to problems is one of the things we do best around here and the team always likes a good challenge. I'm sure we're going to be really glad when Endeavour's finally on orbit but right now, the team is upbeat and ready to execute the plan that we've laid out."

Endeavour commander Mark Kelly and his crewmates -- pilot Gregory H. Johnson, Michael Fincke, Gregory Chamitoff, Andrew Feustel and European Space Agency astronaut Roberto Vittori -- flew back to Houston early Sunday aboard a shuttle training aircraft to participate in additional ascent simulations later this week.

"Things happen fast," Johnson said in a Twitter update. "We are now all aboard an STA for return to Houston. Be back in a few days. More to follow."

The astronauts will remain in medical quarantine and spend their nights in crew quarters at the Johnson Space Center until their return to Florida. While NASA limits contact to reduce the possibility of a crew member getting sick in orbit, the astronauts will be able to visit with family members who have been medically cleared.

That presumably would include Kelly's wife, Gabrielle Giffords, whose recovery from a January assassination attempt has generated widespread public interest. Giffords flew to Florida last week to watch Endeavour's launching, but no details about her subsequent plans have been released.

Endeavour was grounded Friday during the final hours of the countdown because of telemetry indicating multiple fuel line heaters used by one of the shuttle's three hydraulic power units were not activating normally. The heaters are needed to keep the lines from freezing and possibly rupturing in flight.

The shuttle is equipped with three auxiliary power units, providing the hydraulic muscle to move the ship's engine nozzles, wing elevons, rudder, tail fin speed brake, body flap, landing gear brakes and nose wheel steering system. The shuttle can safely fly with a single APU, but flight rules require full redundancy for a countdown to proceed.

Likewise, each of the shuttle's three APUs is equipped with redundant heater "strings" and only one channel is required for normal operation. But again, the flight rules require redundancy to protect against a subsequent failure that could knock the system out of action.

Early Saturday, engineers ruled out a problem with the fuse panel in the shuttle's cockpit that routes power to the APU circuitry. That left two possible culprits: one or more faulty heater control thermostats or the aft load controller assembly, or ALCA-2, avionics box the heater circuitry runs through.

To find out if a faulty thermostat was to blame, engineers working in Endeavour's cramped engine compartment Saturday afternoon sprayed compressed air on APU No. 1's B-channel heater thermostats to lower their temperature enough to find out whether they would cycle on or not. They did not, but that could have been the result of a wiring problem or a bad connector. Additional tests were carried out overnight and no such problems were found.

Engineers met early Sunday and recommended replacing the ALCA-2 box.

"The box will come out tomorrow and we'll send it down to our malfunction lab for a detailed inspection," Leinbach said. "The new box goes in on Tuesday. ... And then after that, we get into the re-test Tuesday night, Wednesday, that kind of timeframe. It's going to be a full two days of re-test."

The shuttle's electrical system features three main circuits, or buses, for redundancy. As a result, three aft load control assemblies are present in the engine compartment.

Each 50-pound box includes dozens of power switches that route electricity to components in nine major systems, including the auxiliary power units, the environmental control and life support system, solid-fuel booster electronics, the shuttle's main engines, its orbital maneuvering system rockets and flight control systems.

The box is located just forward of a right-side engine compartment access door and Leinbach said the replacement operation was not particularly difficult. An ALCA was changed out during a 1995 shuttle launch campaign and engineers will use the same procedures for Endeavour.

The issue for NASA is the time needed to complete testing to make sure the myriad subsystems downstream of the box are receiving power as required.

"Anytime you break connection to a box like this, you essentially invalidate all the testing we did up to that point," Leinbach said. "You could take the tack of saying all you're doing is replacing the box and everything downstream of that box should be fine. Well, that's true, But our requirements, the way we do business is whenever we break a connection we go back and retest it.

"That's just the prudent thing to do and the way our requirements are set. So we have to retest every one of those nine systems. The details within those systems, you could probably write a thesis on how many individual tests there are within those nine systems. And that's why it takes so long."

Assuming NASA sticks with a May 8 launch, Endeavour would dock with the International Space Station around 9 a.m. on May 10 and the mission's primary payload, a $2 billion particle physics detector, would be attached to the lab complex the next day.

The mission's four spacewalks would be carried out May 12, 14, 16 and 18, before undocking around 2 a.m. on May 20. If that schedule holds up, landing back at the Kennedy Space Center would be expected around 6:30 a.m. on May 22.

But NASA managers plan to extend Endeavour's mission by two days, if possible, to give the shuttle crew time to help their space station counterparts with needed internal maintenance. In that case, undocking would slip to May 22 and landing would be expected before dawn on May 24.

The Russians plan to bring three station crew members back to Earth aboard a Soyuz ferry craft on May 23. Because of that, NASA does not expect to have a launch opportunity for Endeavour on May 9. A launch on May 9, plus two extension days, would result in the shuttle and the Soyuz undocking on the same day. Because of sleep-shifting and a variety of other issues, dual undocking operations cannot be accommodated.

=================================

CBS News Space Updates:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=795518752-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

NASA Shuttle Web:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=795518753-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

NASA Station Web:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=795518754-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

Spaceflight Now:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=795518755-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

GoogleSatTrack:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=795518756-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

CBS NEWS COVERAGE of Breaking Space News: 09:50 AM EDT, 05/01/11: NASA rules out Monday launch try; avionics swap-out ordered

CBS NEWS Coverage of Breaking Space News

09:50 AM EDT, 05/01/11: NASA rules out Monday launch try; avionics swap-out ordered

By WILLIAM HARWOOD
CBS News

Engineers have traced an electrical problem blamed for grounding the shuttle Endeavour Friday to an avionics box in the ship's engine compartment, officials said Sunday. Replacing the box will delay launch past Monday, but NASA managers have not yet determined when another attempt might be possible.

An Air Force Atlas 5 rocket carrying a missile early warning satellite is scheduled for launch May 6 with a second day available as a backup. NASA cannot launch Endeavour between May 5 and 7 because the Air Force Eastern Range, which provides tracking and telemetry support for all rockets launched from the East Coast, needs 24 hours between missions to reconfigure equipment.

Whether the Air Force might agree to delay the Atlas launch to make way for Endeavour is not yet known, but work to replace and retest the avionics box is expected to take several days. It appears unlikely NASA could complete that work in time for a launch by May 4, the last available day before the Atlas cutout.

Barring a delay for the Atlas, Endeavour's launch could move to May 8 or, if the Air Force launch slips a day, to May 10. A May 9 launch date is not available for the shuttle because undocking from the International Space Station would come on the same day a Russian Soyuz is scheduled to depart.

Endeavour was grounded Friday during the final hours of the countdown because of telemetry indicating multiple fuel line heaters used by one of the shuttle's three hydraulic power units were not activating normally. The heaters are needed to keep the lines from freezing and possibly rupturing in flight.

The shuttle is equipped with three auxiliary power units, providing the hydraulic muscle to move the ship's engine nozzles, wing elevons, rudder, tail fin speed brake, body flap, landing gear brakes and nose wheel steering system. The shuttle can safely fly with a single APU, but flight rules require full redundancy for a countdown to proceed.

Likewise, each of the shuttle's three APUs is equipped with redundant heater "strings" and only one channel is required for normal operation. But again, the flight rules require redundancy to protect against a subsequent failure that could knock the system out of action.

Early Saturday, engineers ruled out a problem with the fuse panel in the shuttle's cockpit that routes power to the APU circuitry. That left two possible culprits: one or more faulty heater control thermostats or the aft load controller assembly, or ALCA-2, avionics box the heater circuitry runs through.

To find out if a faulty thermostat was to blame, engineers working in Endeavour's cramped engine compartment Saturday afternoon sprayed compressed air on APU No. 1's B-channel heater thermostats to lower their temperature enough to find out whether they would cycle on or not. They did not, but that could have been the result of a wiring problem or a bad connector. Additional tests were carried out overnight and no such problems were found.

Engineers met early Sunday and recommended replacing the ALCA-2 box. It's not yet clear how long that work might take.

"Due to additional troubleshooting required for APU 1 heater issue, Monday's launch attempt has been scrubbed," the launch team was told early Sunday. "Currently in work to secure from launch countdown operations at this time. No new launch date has been determined."

=================================

CBS News Space Updates:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=795302842-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

NASA Shuttle Web:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=795302843-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

NASA Station Web:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=795302844-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

Spaceflight Now:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=795302845-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

GoogleSatTrack:
http://ct.cbsnews.com/clicks?t=795302846-b1f5763a1bcc876b4d45ba4c9a0973ce-bf&brand=CBSNEWS&s=5

NYT: Today's Headlines : Top News | Quotation of The Day | Movies Opinion | World | U.S. | Politics | Business| Technology | Sports | Arts | New York Region | Magazine | Editorials | OP-ED | On This Day

The New York Times

Today's Headlines 

 

May 01, 2011



TOP NEWS

Qaddafi Is Said to Survive NATO Airstrike That Kills Son

By KAREEM FAHIM and DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK
Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi survived a NATO airstrike in Tripoli late Saturday night that killed his youngest son and three of the colonel's grandchildren, a government spokesman announced early Sunday.

Republicans Are Pursuing a Wider Field for 2012 Race

By JEFF ZELENY and JIM RUTENBERG
Republican leaders, activists and donors worry that the party's initial presidential field could squander a chance to capture grass-roots energy and build a strong case against President Obama.

Syrian Businessman Becomes Magnet for Anger and Dissent

By ANTHONY SHADID
Rami Makhlouf, a cousin of President Bashar al-Assad, is at the intersection of family privilege, clan loyalty and the yawning disconnect between ruler and ruled.
QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"The race needs more responsible adults who can actually do the job."
FERGUS CULLEN, a Republican seeking broader presidential field.

Movies

Summer Movies

The critics' take on girls in action movies, Maria Bello's tough dramas, Michael Fassbender on the rise, DVD picks, breakthrough performances and more.
Opinion
Op-Ed Contributor

Portrait of a Despot

Posters of despots all over the Arab world are being torn down by their not-so-adoring peoples - protesters who have been emboldened by freedom's fervor.
WORLD

Syrian Forces Seize Mosque That Was Uprising's Symbol

By ANTHONY SHADID
The capture of the Omari Mosque was a sign of the government's determination to crush dissent in Dara'a.

Costly Afghanistan Road Project Is Marred by Unsavory Alliances

By ALISSA J. RUBIN and JAMES RISEN
The corruption surrounding a major American-financed highway has become another example of sinkholes in Afghanistan for the money of American taxpayers.

Separating Free Speech From Hate in South Africa

By CELIA W. DUGGER
Julius Malema, the leader of the governing party's youth wing, is defending his right to sing a song with the seemingly bloodthirsty line "Shoot the Boer!"
U.S.

In Tornado Zone, Many Ask, 'How Can We Help?'

By ROBBIE BROWN and KIM SEVERSON
As the toll rose in the South, contractors lined up to bid on cleanup contracts and neighbors offered food to victims.

Government's Disaster Response Wins Praise

By KEVIN SACK and TIMOTHY WILLIAMS
The response to tornadoes in the South has drawn little of the searing criticism aimed at federal agencies in 2005.
This Land

Losing Everything, Except What Really Matters

By DAN BARRY
In Cottondale, Ala., near Tuscaloosa, a tornado destroyed the Soper family's house but spared their lives.
POLITICS

In Search for F.B.I. Director, Administration Seeks a Shared Philosophy

By CHARLIE SAVAGE
The ideal candidate would be a strong, independent leader with a low political profile, and respected both inside the bureau and elsewhere in the intelligence community.

Eyeing the White House After Service in China

By MICHAEL WINES
Jon M. Huntsman Jr. has mixed measured criticism of China's government with a relentless effort to cement its fractious relations with the United States.

Levee Breach Moves One Step Closer

By MALCOLM GAY
The Army Corps of Engineers may blow gaps in a Missouri levee, inundating farms and relieving pressure upstream.
BUSINESS

Law Students Lose the Grant Game as Schools Win

By DAVID SEGAL
Merit scholarships help law schools enhance their cachet, but grading curves often make it impossible for students to keep the grants.
DealBook

Buffett Takes Sharper Tone in Sokol Affair

By MICHAEL J. DE LA MERCED
Warren E. Buffett called David Sokol's actions "inexplicable and inexcusable" during Berkshire Hathaway's annual shareholder meeting in Omaha.

In China, Art Is Making a Commercial Statement

By HANNAH SELIGSON
To reach the huge under-30 market in China, advertisers are turning to the country's young artists, musicians and designers to make companies' brands cool.
TECHNOLOGY
Slipstream

Data Privacy, Put to the Test

By NATASHA SINGER
A case before the Supreme Court is ostensibly about medical privacy, but it taps into a much broader debate about consumer protection and informed consent.
Digital Domain

Opt-In Rules Are a Good Start

By RANDALL STROSS
For all their complexity, Facebook's settings offer a guide to establishing some online privacy.
App City

Commuter Reports From, Well, Commuters

By JOSHUA BRUSTEIN
Roadify, an application that started as a Park Slope text-message group on available parking, has expanded to include information for public transit riders.
SPORTS

For Posey Family, the Highlights Keep on Coming

By KAREN CROUSE
Samantha Posey, sister of the 2010 National League rookie of the year Buster Posey, is the leading batter at Valdosta State.
Yankees 5, Blue Jays 4

Return to Fundamentals Pays Off for the Yankees

By ANDREW KEH
Behind a solid start by A. J. Burnett and a few timely hits, the Yankees won without a show of power.
Phillies 2, Mets 1

Halladay, With 18 Straight Strikes, Tops Niese

By DAVID WALDSTEIN
The Mets began their Cy Young sequence on Saturday with a loss as Roy Halladay did what he does best, pitching complete games.
ARTS
Television

Facing Age With a Saucy Wink

By FRANK BRUNI
At 89, Betty White is riding high. And she has a new memoir of sorts, "If You Ask Me (And of Course You Won't)."
Abroad

When Art and Energy Were SoHo Neighbors

By MICHAEL KIMMELMAN
Why was SoHo in its early days special in ways that, despite the art world's current money and hype, seem so hard to come by now?

Art for Sale, No Introduction Needed

By CAROL VOGEL
The major spring art auctions begin this week and will feature many instantly recognizable images by artists like Warhol, Koons and Picasso.
NEW YORK / REGION

Father and Son, Bunking in G Block

By MANNY FERNANDEZ
Convicted and sentenced in 1996 for robbery and attempted murder, Bernard and Scott Peters occupy a rare spot as bunkmates in maximum-security lockup.
New York Story

This Town Is Big Enough for Both of Us

By ALAN FEUER
A West Side resident meets an Upper East Sider with the same name, who turns out to be an amiable right-wing nudist socialite.
Spokes

In Schools, a Push to Pedal

By J. DAVID GOODMAN
With an eye on safety, a handful of New York City schools are starting to offer bike riding as part of the physical education curriculum.
MAGAZINE

A Beast in the Heart of Every Fighting Man

By LUKE MOGELSON
The case against American soldiers accused of murdering Afghan civilians turns on the idea of a rogue unit. But what if the killings are a symptom of a deeper problem?

Can Kristen Wiig Turn On the Charm?

By SUSAN DOMINUS
After making her name by playing annoying oddballs, a comedic sidekick gets her big shot.

Cooking Up a Big Idea in Little Italy

By FRANK BRUNI
The chefs at a tiny Manhattan restaurant are meddling with the sacrosanct traditions of Italian cooking and turning them into a brave new cuisine.
EDITORIALS
Editorial

The Ryan Plan for Medicaid

A good deal for the federal government would be a very bad deal for the states.
Editorial

Mr. Geithner's Loophole

A plan to exempt a $4 trillion-a-day market from regulation invites more trouble.
Editorial

Some Sunshine for the Campaign Jungle

Obama should sign a proposed executive order that would require government contractors to disclose their donations. Taxpayers have a right and need to know what favors are being curried.
Editorial

Voice of the Derby Steps Down

Tom Durkin, the signature baritone of the Triple Crown, bowed out as announcer of the Kentucky Derby.
OP-ED
Op-Ed Contributor

The High Cost of Low Teacher Salaries

By DAVE EGGERS and NÍNIVE CLEMENTS CALEGARI
To revamp our education system, blame teachers less and pay them more.
Op-Ed Columnist

Who Married Up: The Women or the Men?

By MAUREEN DOWD
Yearning for a triumph of hope over experience, we want this fairy tale to end happily ever after.
Op-Ed Columnist

My Libya, Your Libya, Our Libya

By ROGER COHEN
A trip into the paranoid labyrinth of Muammar el-Qaddafi.
Op-Ed Columnist

Where China Outpaces America

By NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF
When a Shanghai child outlives an American child on average, that's a reminder that China is more than just another autocratic country.
Op-Ed Contributor

A New Measure for Classroom Quality

By R. BARKER BAUSELL
Instead of test scores, gauge how much time a teacher teaches.
Op-Ed Contributor

When Bad Things Happen to Do-Good People

By DAVID RAKOFF
Our unseemly delight at the troubles of the seemingly altruistic, explained.
Op-Ed Contributor

Unsafe at Any Dose

By HELEN CALDICOTT
Doctors must do more than treat cancers. We must enter the nuclear debate.
Op-Ed Contributor

That '70s Energy Crisis

By SUSAN STRAIGHT
A summer of rationing, scamming and gas-starved mobs.
Letters to the Public Editor

Looking In on Other Papers' Problems

Correspondence from readers about recent Public Editor columns.
ON THIS DAY
On May 1, 1960, the Soviet Union shot down an American U-2 reconnaissance plane near Sverdlovsk and captured its pilot, Francis Gary Powers.