Translate

Search This Blog

Search Tool




Dec 31, 2011

NYT Global Update: Euro, Introduced With Flourish, Gets Little Celebration at Its 10-Year Mark

Global Update


TOP NEWS

Euro, Introduced With Flourish, Gets Little Celebration at Its 10-Year Mark

By NICHOLAS KULISH
Even without the economic crisis, many Europeans seem to believe that the day their new currency was introduced may be one better quickly forgotten.
Drilling Down

Hunt for Gas Hits Fragile Soil, and South Africans Fear Risks

By IAN URBINA
A plan to drill for natural gas in the Karoo region of South Africa would use millions of gallons of water in a drought-stricken area.

Strategic Somali Town Is Seized by Ethiopians

By MOHAMMED IBRAHIM and JEFFREY GETTLEMAN
The loss of Beledweyne, a trading hub near the Ethiopian border, leaves Shabab rebels on the defensive.
Multimedia

Video Feature: Year in Review 2011

Staff members from The New York Times discuss some of the major stories of the year.
Opinion

Op-Ed Contributor

Sri Lanka's Ghosts of War

By NAMINI WIJEDASA
If Sri Lanka wants true reconciliation, the government must take responsibility for civilian deaths during the civil war.
WORLD

Orphans' Defender Jostles With Afghan Corruption

By ROD NORDLAND
The director of Afghanistan's orphanages is trying to improve their management but must confront pervasive corruption and political favoritism.

Syrian Opposition Groups Aim for Unity

By KAREEM FAHIM
The two largest groups that oppose President Bashar al-Assad agreed on a common approach to organizing a transitional government.

Emergency Declared in 4 Nigerian States

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
President Goodluck Jonathan directed top security officials to set up a special counterterrorism unit to fight the growing threat posed by Boko Haram.
BUSINESS
Economic View

I Just Got Here, but I Know Trouble When I See It

Jobs. Europe. Housing. Health care. The writers of the Economic View column examine these and other big issues of the new year, and possible ways to solve them.

Your Recycled Resolutions Are a Boon for Business

By NATASHA SINGER
The self-improvement industry thrives on New Year's resolutions gone awry. After all, if you don't lose those pounds or stop smoking this year, you'll probably try again in 2013.
TECHNOLOGY
Novelties

Defining Words, Without the Arbiters

By ANNE EISENBERG
Wordnik, the online dictionary, brings some of the Web's vox populi to the definition of words. It shows "what's out there right now," one of its founders says.
Corner Office | John Donovan

Strive for Results, Not for the Accolades

By ADAM BRYANT
John Donovan of AT&T says that getting credit for accomplishments isn't as important as assembling and leading the best team.
Workstation

The Year of the Multitaskers' Revenge

By PHYLLIS KORKKI
Technology's continuing onslaught, and employees' response to it, will be central issues for the American workplace of 2012.
SPORTS
Soccer Roundup

Manchester United Is Upset; Still Trails Manchester City

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Grant Hanley's goal in the 80th minute broke a 2-2 tie and spoiled the 70th birthday of Alex Ferguson, the manager of Manchester United.

United Aims for Sole Possession of Premier League Lead

By ROB HUGHES
Alex Ferguson has warmed up to the last weekend of 2011 with two 5-0 victories, and a third on Saturday could take his team to where it started the year: alone atop the Premier League.

A New Year of Pushing the Boundaries of Human Endurance

By TOM SIMS
Running, climbing or sailing, a few extreme athletes are going to be in for the long haul next year.
U.S. NEWS
Fresno Journal

A Hmong Generation Finds Its Voice in Writing

By PATRICIA LEIGH BROWN
As the first generation to grow up with a written language - rather than the traditional spoken word - the members of the Hmong American Writers' Circle are addressing a new kind of coming of age in America.

In Washington, Large Rewards in Teacher Pay

By SAM DILLON
In a new system to retain young talent, about 476 teachers received sizable bonuses this year, with 235 of them getting unusually large pay raises.

Over Phones and Greasy Pizza, a Battle for Iowa

By A. G. SULZBERGER and MICHAEL BARBARO
Far from candidates' spotlights, hundreds of aides and volunteers are waging an unglamorous ground war unfolding with hidden intensity.
OPINION
Opinion

Time to Sell the Gold

By FRED A. BERNSTEIN
My mother's jewelry isn't bringing the prices Elizabeth Taylor's did, but it pays to shop around.
Opinion

New Rules for the New Year

By BILL MAHER
Forget egocentric New Year's resolutions. It's time for New Rules for how the world should work.
Opinion

Serving With Saddam's Ladle

By LAURA BLUMENFELD
I ran back and forth between the Sabbath meal and the bidding on eBay for a ladle once owned by Saddam Hussein.

ABC News Australia | Morning Edition: Top Stories Australia ushers in 2012


  Morning Edition
Sun 01 Jan, 2012

 

Top Stories

Australia ushers in 2012

Sydney's harbour erupted in a blaze of colour and light as Australia ushered in the new year in style.
More »


 More Top Stories »

The Drum


2011 was a bad year, 2012 will be much worse

And so, here we are again. The end of 2011 looms, the stern faces of Janus looking back on what has been and saying, "well that was crap", and forward to what will be and saying, "it just gets worse".
And indeed it is a comfort, as we contemplate the living hell that has been this year, to think that next year will definitely be much worse.
But before we struggle on into the vale of tears that is the future, let's reflect on what we've all just been through.
More »

More Analysis »

Business

Alan Kohler's Top 10 charts of 2011

Alan Kohler, a man who loves a good chart, looks back on his favourite finance charts of 2011 and what they say about where we have been and where we are heading.
More »

 More Business »




Australia

Cabinet papers offer glimpse inside government

Cabinet papers from the early 1980s have been released, shedding light on the economic woes besetting the Fraser government and the incoming Hawke government's role in preventing the Franklin Dam.
More »
  
More Australia »


NYT Today's Headlines: Group's Ads Rip at Gingrich as Romney Stands Clear



TOP NEWS

Group's Ads Rip at Gingrich as Romney Stands Clear

By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE and JIM RUTENBERG
An advertising deluge against Newt Gingrich by a group supporting Mitt Romney shows how a court ruling has created powerful ways for outside money to influence elections.

As Spain Acts to Cut Deficit, Regional Debts Add to Woe

By SUZANNE DALEY
Announcing spending cuts and higher taxes to address a wide budget deficit, Spain admitted its finances were probably even worse because of reckless outlays by its autonomous regions.

Organic Agriculture May Be Outgrowing Its Ideals

By ELISABETH ROSENTHAL
Even as more Americans buy foods labeled organic, the products are moving away from a traditional emphasis on local growing and limited environmental strain.
QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"You can ask a random question about sex and you don't feel it was stupid. Even if it was, they can't judge you because they don't know it's you. And it's too gross to ask my parents."
STEPHANIE CISNEROS, a Denver-area high school junior, on a text-chat program that provides answers to young people's questions about sex, part of a growing trend in online sex education.

Science

Video: Planting the Beach

American demand for year-round organic fruits and vegetables has incited a farming boom in the arid deserts of the Baja Peninsula in Mexico.
Opinion
'A Sad, Fearful, Raging Year'
Opinionator | Disunion

'A Sad, Fearful, Raging Year'

At the end of a terrible year, newspapers North and South expressed hope and fear for what will come in 1862.
WORLD
Drilling Down

Hunt for Gas Hits Fragile Soil, and South Africans Fear Risks

By IAN URBINA
A plan to drill for natural gas in the Karoo region of South Africa would use millions of gallons of water in a drought-stricken area.

Egypt Vows to End Crackdown on Nonprofits

By STEVEN LEE MYERS and DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK
Egypt's military rulers privately signaled a retreat in a crackdown on organizations that promote democracy and human rights, senior American officials said.
India's Way

Many of India's Poor Turn to Private Schools

By VIKAS BAJAJ and JIM YARDLEY
Many poor families have turned away from public education, but new government rules are seen as a threat to private institutions.
U.S.

Sex Education Gets Directly to Youths, via Text

By JAN HOFFMAN
Some health organizations and school districts are developing Web sites and text services to reach teenagers.

As Crop Prices Soar, Iowa Farms Add Acreage

By A. G. SULZBERGER
In the Midwest, the spike in farm earnings has encouraged farmers to put more land into production, including parcels once deemed unsuitable.

Facing Consequences of Success in Bid to Save a Goose

By FELICITY BARRINGER
A century of efforts to sustain snow geese along their migratory paths may have succeeded a little too well.
POLITICS

As Gingrich Reels From Attack Ads, Some Aides Suggest Fighting Back

By TRIP GABRIEL
Newt Gingrich's vow to stay positive draws applause at campaign stops, but his drop in the polls raises questions about that strategy.

Paul Assails Rivals' Criticism of His Policy on Iran

By MICHAEL D. SHEAR and RICHARD A. OPPEL Jr.
Representative Ron Paul says that overreaction by the United States to Iran's nuclear program could lead to a war.

A New Hampshire Focus for Huntsman

By KATHARINE Q. SEELYE
Jon M. Huntsman Jr. has warmed to his identity as the Man Who Would Dare Skip Iowa.
BUSINESS

When Investors Rush In, and Out, Together

By GRAHAM BOWLEY
The prices of financial assets, which in normal conditions move in unpredictable directions, are increasingly surging up or down in lockstep.

Wall Street Ends Back Where It Started

By CHRISTINE HAUSER
The S.&P. 500 was statistically unchanged for the year, while the Dow was up 5.5 percent. Major European and Asian indexes declined by double-digit percentages.
Off the Charts

The Year Governments Lost Their Credibility

By FLOYD NORRIS
In 2011, European governments badly underestimated the debt crisis and the United States nearly defaulted and had its credit rating cut.
TECHNOLOGY

After Outcry, Verizon Abandons $2 Fee

By RON LIEBER
Verizon Wireless bowed to consumer anger on Friday, reversing a day-old plan to impose a bill-paying fee that would have applied to only some customers.

Finding the Cleanup Crew After a Messy Hack Attack

By NICOLE PERLROTH
After a prominent attack on Stratfor, a security group, specialists in computer breaches say companies that are under siege must act quickly to assess and contain the damage.

Today's Cable Guy, Upgraded and Better-Dressed

By AMY CHOZICK
As cable companies race to evolve, their front-line workers try to keep up with new dress codes and backgrounds in engineering and computer science.
SPORTS
Lens Blog

Looking Back at the Year in Sports

By KERRI MACDONALD
Here are the moments from 2012 that captured the majesty, magic and misery of sports.
2011 Scrapbook

Memories From the Year in Sports

By THE NEW YORK TIMES
Every day this week, reporters and editors for The Times will recall the people, teams and moments that made the past year memorable.

A Jets Victory Would Let the Squirming Begin

By BEN SHPIGEL
The Jets' playoff chances could be decided while they are on a jet, cut off from the Internet and cellphones.
ARTS
Theater

Backstage Veterans, Taking a Breath After Long Runs

By ERIK PIEPENBURG
Backstage veterans of "Billy Elliot" and "The Addams Family" reflect on an era of steady paychecks and consider what's next.
Music Review | Phish

A Band Tradition, Both Carried On and Changed

By JON PARELES
Phish continues its practice of performing at Madison Square Garden at this time of year.

This Is How the End Begins

By MANOHLA DARGIS
The overture to Lars von Trier's "Melancholia" references the Marquis de Sade, "Hamlet," the Bible and more in its first eight minutes.
NEW YORK / REGION

Police Tactic: Keeping Crime Reports Off the Books

By AL BAKER and JOSEPH GOLDSTEIN
Some New Yorkers have expressed frustration in trying to persuade officers to take crime reports.

Amid Inquiry, Comptroller Ends $800 Cap on Donations

By DAVID W. CHEN
John C. Liu, the New York City comptroller, who is under investigation, has lifted an $800 cap on contributions, allowing him to seek larger amounts of money from a smaller group of people.

A Collapse at a Poultry Shop Exposes a Rift Among Neighbors

By ANNE BARNARD
The smells and sights of Yeung Sun Live Poultry disturbed some in its gentrifying stretch of Brooklyn waterfront, but locals' reactions are mixed now that a freak accident may shutter it.
TRAVEL

My Week at the Biggest Loser Fat Camp

By JENNIFER CONLIN
You can watch "The Biggest Loser" on television. Or you can live it, at a resort where guests are prodded and pushed and left panting.

36 Hours: Trinidad

By BAZ DREISINGER
Trinidad is a place of unspoiled beaches, Creole culture and the Caribbean's most electrifying night life.
Practical Traveler

Insider Travel Tips From Campaign Reporters

By ASHLEY PARKER
Nothing instructs in the art of efficient travel like following a campaigning presidential candidate.
EDITORIALS
Editorial

The Damage of 2011

After Republicans took control of the House this year, they weakened many programs that Americans need.
Editorial

Egypt's Obstructionist Generals

The determination of the military council to hang on to power is the biggest threat to stability in the country.
Editorial

Big Coal's Bidding

It shouldn't take another disaster, like the Upper Big Branch explosion in 2010, to make lawmakers take action to protect lives.
OP-ED
Op-Ed Contributor

Sri Lanka's Ghosts of War

By NAMINI WIJEDASA
If Sri Lanka wants true reconciliation, the government must take responsibility for civilian deaths during the civil war.
Op-Ed Columnist

A Quiz for All Seasons

By GAIL COLLINS
Here's the End-of-the-Year Republican Presidential Primary Quiz. No peeking at the answers, people, until all questions have been answered!
Op-Ed Columnist

The College Sports Cartel

By JOE NOCERA
The N.C.A.A. is a walking, talking antitrust violation.
ON THIS DAY
On Dec. 31, 1946, President Harry S. Truman officially proclaimed the end of hostilities in World War II.