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Jun 18, 2011

NYT: Today's Headlines: Top News | Quotation of The Day | U.S. Interactive Map | Opinion | World | U.S. | Politics | Business | Technology | Sports | Arts | New York / Region / Travel / Editorials / OP -ED / On This Day



TOP NEWS

Hospitals Performed Needless Double CT Scans, Records Show

By WALT BOGDANICH and JO CRAVEN McGINTY
Hundreds of hospitals across the country needlessly exposed patients to radiation by scanning their chests twice on the same day, records indicate.

2 Top Lawyers Lost to Obama in Libya War Policy Debate

By CHARLIE SAVAGE
President Obama rejected the views of the lawyers when he decided he had the authority to continue U.S. participation in Libya without Congressional authorization.

U.S. Pressing Its Crackdown Against Leaks

By SCOTT SHANE
The case of Stephen J. Kim, an arms expert, is next in line in the Obama administration's unprecedented crackdown against leaks to the media.
QUOTATION OF THE DAY
"These politicians just don't realize how important that one $240 check is."
FRANK BALLESTEROS, 62, whose unemployment benefits will run out next week because Arizona legislators declined an extension with federal money.

U.S.

Interactive Map: Scanning Twice

A map showing rates of double CT scans at U.S. hospitals.
Opinion
The Week in Privacy (Just Between Us)
Opinionator | The Thread

The Week in Privacy (Just Between Us)

How much should the F.B.I., the C.I.A. and Mark Zuckerberg know about the lives of American citizens?
WORLD

In Libya, More Novice Soldiers in Defense of Qaddafi

By DAVID D. KIRKPATRICK
With professional soldiers called away to rebel hot spots, amateurs are an increasingly important part of Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi's defense of the capital.

Violent Clashes as Thousands Protest in Cities Across Syria

By ANTHONY SHADID
Deaths and injuries are reported as government forces attack demonstrators in two large cities.

Syrian Town Is Strained by Flood of Refugees

By LIAM STACK
Syrian security forces were coming nearer to makeshift refugee camps lining the border with Turkey.
U.S.

In the Town of Phil Campbell, a Gathering of Phil Campbells

By KIM SEVERSON
What started as a joke, a centennial celebration for Phil Campbell, Ala., turned into a relief effort in the aftermath of a tornado that killed 26 people in the little town.

Frozen Dead Guy Festival for Sale (the Man Himself Stays on Ice)

By KIRK JOHNSON
The Nederland Area Chamber of Commerce is selling the name and rights to their annual late-winter "Frozen Dead Guy Days," festival.

Meditating in Silence as the Fire Draws Near

By MARC LACEY
The outside world, in the form of a huge wildfire, threatens the serenity of 39 Buddhists living in seclusion and silence who are about six months into a planned three-year retreat.
POLITICS
White House Memo

Obama vs. Boehner: Tee-Off Time

By HELENE COOPER
The House speaker, an accomplished golfer, takes on the president. They may also discuss the debt ceiling.
Political Memo

After Snips to Budget, a Thicket Looms

By CARL HULSE
As a deadline to raise the federal debt limit approaches, lawmakers are just beginning to weigh the fiscal trade-offs necessary for a compromise that could clear the way for a Congressional vote.

U.S. Pledges to Raise Deportation Threshold

By JULIA PRESTON
Officials say an enforcement program would focus more on deporting immigrants convicted of serious crimes.
BUSINESS

For Want of a Word, Arizona's Jobless Lose Checks

By CATHERINE RAMPELL
Because of ideological opposition and other priorities, Arizona and some other states have not made the change needed to keep federally financed unemployment checks going.

A Watchdog Professor, Now Defending Himself

By DAVID CARR and JOHN SCHWARTZ
David Protess made a name for himself as the Innocence Project he led exonerated a dozen wrongly convicted defendants. Then he locked horns with a prosecutor.
DealBook

Abracadabra! Magic Trumps Math at Web Start-Ups

By MICHAEL J. DE LA MERCED
Internet start-ups are using a variety of nonstandard financial approaches to spin their results into a more favorable light.
TECHNOLOGY

Deploying New Tools to Stop the Hackers

By CHRISTOPHER DREW and VERNE G. KOPYTOFF
Security expects say that new hacking threats from smartphone and Web links require a new generation of tools.
Watchlist

All Those Online Videos, Still Chasing an Audience

By MIKE HALE
Original online video has received publicity, but is still developing.

Delivering a Lawyer Within 15 Minutes (Soda Extra)

By JOHN SCHWARTZ
A new company, LawyerUp, promises to get people in trouble a lawyer within 15 minutes.
SPORTS

Highest Praise for McIlroy Comes From Inside the Ropes

By BILL PENNINGTON
Phil Mickelson was one of many who watched Rory McIlroy's record-setting shotmaking in wonder during the second round of the United States Open.

A Normal Teenager, Who's Playing in the Open

By JULIET MACUR
At 16, Beau Hossler is the youngest player at the Open this week - and one of the youngest in Open history.
Angels 4, Mets 3

Mets' Resilience Falls Flat for a Night

By ANDREW KEH
The Mets have been consistent in their inconsistency this season, and on Friday they suffered their second straight one-run loss.
ARTS

American Star Shines in Hall of Mirrors

By MAÏA DE LA BAUME
Craig Ferguson tapes a week of "The Late Late Show With Craig Ferguson" in Paris.

No Season for Loners: People (and Penguins) Stick Together in Films

By MICHAEL CIEPLY
What is the force bringing people together in the plots of the spring crop of movies, from "Thor" to "The Hangover Part II"? The economy? Evolution? Twitter?
Video Game Review

14 Years of Waiting Have Come to an End

By SETH SCHIESEL
The video game Duke Nukem Forever has been released after 14 years of development.
NEW YORK / REGION
Flushing Meadows Journal

Towers With Babel's Diversity, but a Much Happier History

By JOSEPH BERGER
Terrace on the Park, the catering hall in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park, has three cavernous ballrooms, a versatile kitchen and breathtaking views.

Bruno Asks Appeals Court to Spare Him Another Trial

By WILLIAM GLABERSON
The conviction of the former New York Senate leader was undercut by a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling. On Friday he asked a federal appeals court to leave it at that.

After Talks With G.O.P., Cuomo Expects Passage of Gay Marriage Bill

By DANNY HAKIM and THOMAS KAPLAN
Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo said Friday that he expected a same-sex marriage bill to be approved soon by the New York State Legislature.
TRAVEL

Back to Provence

By NICHOLAS DELBANCO
Forty years after the honeymoon, a couple returns. What has changed more, the landscape or them?

36 Hours in Newport, R.I.

By FREDA MOON
This harbor town is more than model ships and mansions: upstart restaurants, a boisterous night life and a beachy surf culture belie Newport's staid reputation.
Footsteps

Blood, Sand, Sherry: Hemingway's Madrid

By DAVID FARLEY
Ernest Hemingway loved Madrid, leaving a distinct, mostly booze-stained trail.
EDITORIALS
Editorial

Debt Limit Endgame

Damage control may be the best outcome to hope for in the negotiations between the White House and Republicans.
Editorial

Syria's Nightmare

It is past time for President Assad to "get out of the way."
Editorial

The Treaty and the Law

Congress should pass a law to ensure that foreign nationals who are arrested are told of their right to contact their embassy.
Editorial

A Book at the Beach

With sand, seawater, suntan lotion, melting ice cream and who knows what else blowing by, can you actually read while relaxing seaside?
OP-ED
Op-Ed Contributor

How to End the N.F.L. Deadlock

By ARLEN SPECTER
Congress can - and should - intervene to force a resolution to the dispute.
Op-Ed Columnist

The Banking Miracle

By JOE NOCERA
The Glass-Steagall Act, signed into law in 1933, was amazingly radical, not just for its time, but for any time.
Op-Ed Columnist

Remembrances of My Father

By CHARLES M. BLOW
Regardless of how damaged the relationship, it's always possible for a father to leave a stamp of love - no matter how small or seemingly inconsequential - on his child.
Op-Ed Contributor

Arab Spring, Kurdish Summer

By SEBAHAT TUNCEL
It is time for Turkey's oppressed Kurdish minority to demand greater autonomy and freedom.
ON THIS DAY
On June 18, 1948, the United Nations Commission on Human Rights adopted its International Declaration of Human Rights.

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