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Aug 14, 2010

THE GATA DISPATCHES.:Adrian Douglas: Gold market isn't 'fixed'; it's rigged/ Morgan retreating from silver rig/August 14th., 2010

1.- Adrian Douglas: Gold market isn't 'fixed'; it's rigged

10:11a Saturday, August 14, 2010
Dear Friend of GATA and Gold:
Following research done by GATA consultant Dmitri Speck, GATA board member Adrian Douglas has studied the morning and afternoon "fixing" of the gold price by the major London trading houses and concludes that it is just as much a price-suppression mechanism as the London Gold Pool of the 1960s admittedly was.
"The more gold rises overnight in essentially Asian markets," Douglas writes, "the more it is sold down into the PM fix. This was exactly the modus operandum of the London Gold Pool but now it is being done covertly."
Douglas, publisher of the Market Force Analysis letter, continues: "Such a consistent manipulative effort would necessarily involve entities with access to large amounts of gold; this implicates central banks, as they are the only entities with large hoards of gold, and furthermore they have a motive for suppressing the price of gold, which is to hide their mismanagement and debasement of their national currencies. Further, the five bullion banks that conduct the fix would have to be complicit because by definition they are responsible for determining the clearing price on the fix, so they must be aware of the impact on price of the selling activities of the entity or entities offering gold in such large quantities that it causes such price aberrations. As the central banks do not trade themselves, it is more than likely that some or all of the banks involved in the fix also act on behalf of central banks. What is irrefutable from this analysis is that the gold market is n ot 'fixed'; it is rigged."
Douglas' analysis is titled "Gold Market Is Not 'Fixed,' It's Rigged" and you can find it at GATA's Internet site here:
http://www.gata.org/files/AdrianDouglasGoldMarketRigged-08-14-2010.doc
And at the Market Force Analysis Internet site here:
https://marketforceanalysis.com/articles/latest_article_081310.html
CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee Inc.

2.- Morgan retreating from silver rig, Ted Butler tells King World News

9a ET Saturday, August 14, 2010
Dear Friend of GATA and Gold (and Silver):
Silver market analyst Ted Butler tells Eric King of King World News that the configuration of big futures market players in gold and silver remains bullish and that he strongly believes that JPMorganChase, the big short rigging the silver market, is permanently reducing its position in anticipation of new position limits to be imposed by the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission. You can listen to the interview at the King World News Internet site here:
http://www.kingworldnews.com/kingworldnews/Broadcast_Gold+/Entries/2010/...
CHRIS POWELL, Secretary/Treasurer
Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee Inc.

The Washington Post: Today's Highlights.- August 14th.,2010



TODAY'S HIGHLIGHTS

President defends plans for N.Y. mosque
President Obama on Friday forcefully joined the national debate over construction of an Islamic complex near New York's Ground Zero, telling guests at a White House dinner marking the holy month of Ramadan that opposing the project is at odds with American values.
(By Michael D. Shear and Scott Wilson, The Washington Post)

Afghans reject good guy-bad guy narrative
Foreign forces still blamed for civilian deaths despite spike from insurgent violence
(By David Nakamura, The Washington Post)

In a tight spot, Sen. Reid colors his foe 'wacky,' reactionary
Majority leader's team tries to make Angle less popular with Nevada voters than he is
(By Amy Gardner, The Washington Post)

Big chunk of stimulus yet to be spent
(By Alec MacGillis, The Washington Post)

Washington Redskins dominate Buffalo Bills, 42-17, as Shanahan, McNabb debut in preseason
(By Jason Reid, The Washington Post)


POLITICS
Utah straddling a new line on illegal residents
CENTERFIELD, UTAH -- Just weeks ago, Utah seemed destined to become the next state to draw a rigid line against illegal immigration. Lawmakers were completing work on a proposal similar to the one Arizona had approved, authorizing police to check the immigration status of those suspected of being in...
(By Michael W. Savage, The Washington Post)

In a tight spot, Sen. Reid colors his foe 'wacky,' reactionary
Majority leader's team tries to make Angle less popular with Nevada voters than he is
(By Amy Gardner, The Washington Post)

President defends plans for N.Y. mosque
JOINS DEBATE OVER GROUND ZERO SITE
Blocking project would violate freedom of worship, he says

(By Michael D. Shear and Scott Wilson, The Washington Post)

'I have not violated anything,' Waters says
BLASTS MEDIA, ETHICS PANEL
Democrat speaks out, defends links to bank

(By Perry Bacon Jr., The Washington Post)

Major banks gird for 'Volcker rule'
BIG SOURCE OF PROFIT BANNED
Firms reorganize, await details on compliance

(By Jia Lynn Yang, The Washington Post)

More Politics

NATION
Utah straddling a new line on illegal residents
CENTERFIELD, UTAH -- Just weeks ago, Utah seemed destined to become the next state to draw a rigid line against illegal immigration. Lawmakers were completing work on a proposal similar to the one Arizona had approved, authorizing police to check the immigration status of those suspected of being in...
(By Michael W. Savage, The Washington Post)

5-day-after contraceptive wins FDA approval
Ella said to be more effective than Plan B; abortion foes say drug was misclassified
(By Rob Stein, The Washington Post)

Communication woes, scammers marred early gulf cleanup efforts
Watermen overlooked, as opportunists claimed jobs meant for those affected
(By Kimberly Kindy, The Washington Post)

Army analyst celebrated as antiwar hero
Many rally to soldier's defense after disclosure of classified documents
(By Michael W. Savage, The Washington Post)

Relief-well drilling called imperative
(By Tom Breen, The Washington Post)

More Nation

WORLD
Afghans reject good guy-bad guy narrative
KABUL -- During the first six months of the year, 1,271 Afghan civilians had been killed in an increasingly violent war. On Tuesday, Hafizullah Azizi, a handsome 22-year-old who financially supported his mother and five younger siblings, was added to the list.
(By David Nakamura, The Washington Post)

Russia to load fuel for Iranian reactor
PROJECT PROCEEDS DESPITE U.S. STANCE
Officials say U.N. watchdog supervising first power plant

(By Vladimir Isachenkov, The Washington Post)

Young standing up for democracy in Sudan
Movement forged in run-up to April elections encourages citizens to know and demand their rights
(By Rebecca Hamilton, The Washington Post)

In Internet age, Saudi king blocks issuance of public fatwas
(By Heba Saleh, The Washington Post)

Army analyst celebrated as antiwar hero
Many rally to soldier's defense after disclosure of classified documents
(By Michael W. Savage, The Washington Post)

More World

METRO
Survivors recall moments leading up to Alaska plane crash
The first accounts from survivors of Monday's Alaska plane crash that killed former U.S. senator Ted Stevens and four others emerged Friday with one telling investigators that the plane "was flying along" normally, and then "just stopped flying," slamming nosefirst into a remote hillside.
(By Ashley Halsey III, The Washington Post)

Bank alert system shuts out suspicious group
(By Martin Weil, The Washington Post)

New boundaries, higher premiums
As Fairfax updates flood plain map, residents learn they must buy new insurance
(By Fredrick Kunkle, The Washington Post)

Sheriff disregarded calls to review theft evidence
Pr. George's Jackson testifies he promoted alleged embezzler
(By Ruben Castaneda, The Washington Post)

Local Digest
(The Washington Post)

More Metro

BUSINESS
5-day-after contraceptive wins FDA approval
The Food and Drug Administration approved a controversial new form of emergency contraception Friday that can prevent a pregnancy as many as five days after sex.
(By Rob Stein, The Washington Post)

Three Fla. youths fly alone without permission -- or difficulty
Incident prompts speculation about airport security
(By Brendan Farrington, The Washington Post)

Big chunk of stimulus yet to be spent
(By Alec MacGillis, The Washington Post)

Local Digest
(The Washington Post)

Stocks fall for fourth straight day
Investors worried that economic recovery is hamstrung
(By Sonja Ryst, The Washington Post)

More Business

SPORTS
Pavano wins 15th game as Minnesota edges Oakland
MINNEAPOLIS -- Carl Pavano pitched into the seventh inning for his 15th win, Danny Valencia had two hits and two RBIs and the Minnesota Twins held on to beat the Oakland Athletics 4-3 on Friday night.
(AP)

McNabb throws TD pass; Redskins top Bills 42-17
(JOSEPH WHITE, AP)

More Sports

STYLE
A landmark in familiar territory
My exposure to Dora Marquez over the past decade has been blessedly incidental. She's the little Latina girl with a backpack and a monkey friend, right? She goes on aventuras fant?sticas and throws in a few Spanish words here and there but nothing that would jeopardize fair trade or infuriate the...
(By Hank Stuever, The Washington Post)

Celebrating art-world stardom -- along with his eighth birthday
(By Jill Lawless, The Washington Post)

A writer finds there's little market for the real truth
(By Frances Stead Sellers, The Washington Post)

Clyde's jazzing up its menu with plan for D.C. nightclub
New eatery a no-brainer. Now executive must try to drum up musical talent.
(By Chris Richards, The Washington Post)

Salahis' municipal escort service raises eyebrows
(By Paul Farhi and Amy Argetsinger, The Washington Post)

More Style


Mexico's grim accounting
GIVE MEXICAN President Felipe Calder?n credit for honesty as well as courage. Last week he presided over a three-day public conference to assess the results of nearly four years of war against Mexico's drug cartels. Most of the facts were grim:
(The Washington Post)

Don't pursue
The case of Lt. Col. Victor Fehrenbach shows the absurdity of 'don't ask, don't tell.'
(The Washington Post)

Safety on the rails
After a brawl, stepping up police presence on Metro makes sense.
(The Washington Post)

MarketWatch: Personal Finance Daily: This Week 'sTop Personal Finance Stories. August 14th., 2010


MarketWatch

Personal Finance Daily
AUGUST 14, 2010

This week's top Personal Finance stories

By MarketWatch



In case you missed them, here are the top 10 Personal Finance stories from MarketWatch for the week of Aug. 9-13:

What happens if Fannie and Freddie disappear?

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac may be effectively insolvent, but they're backing over half of all U.S. mortgages. That has some people worried.
See full story on what remodeling Fannie and Freddie means to homeowners.


Five mortgage funds for retail-hungry buyers

Mortgage rates are sliding, with the 30-year, fixed-rate loan at its lowest level in almost 40 years. That's good news for home buyers and homeowners, but not for yield-oriented investors.
See full story on mortgage funds to consider.


Legislative battle on horizon for future of Fannie and Freddie

Now that the most sweeping financial-reform bill since the Great Depression is law, Washington is finally getting around to dealing with the hard part: Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.
See full story on the battle over Fannie and Freddie.


Mortgage rates continue to fall, setting record lows

Fixed-rate mortgages continued their decline to record lows this week and the 5-year adjustable rate also reached a new low, Freddie Mac reported.
See full story on tumbling mortgage rates.


Apartment market shows signs of improvement

The apartment industry often doesn't improve until the job market strengthens, and workers gain the confidence to drop their roommate and get a place of their own or move out of their parents' basement.
See Amy Hoak's Home Economics on apartment market shows signs of improvement.


Parents, students dig deeper to pay for college

Faced with rising college expenses, families dug deeper into their own pockets and borrowed more money to pay tuition bills in the 2009-10 school year, according to a survey by Sallie Mae and Gallup released Tuesday.
See story on families dig deeper to pay for college.


What not to tell your insurer after an accident

Everyone knows, or should know, that you should never lie to your insurance company -- that would be fraud -- but what you say and what you do does matter.
See Jennifer Waters' Consumer Confidential.


Tips for firms to avoid sexual-harassment problems

Hewlett-Packard said Mark Hurd did not violate the company's sexual-harassment policy, but the unfolding drama raises questions: What does constitute sexual harassment, and how should firms address the issue?
See story on tips for firms to avoid sexual-harassment problems.


Say goodbye to cheap flights

The cheap-flight party is over. After a string of mostly profitable earnings reports, a sizable jump in fee revenues and an uptick in fares, airlines are enjoying an unusually strong recovery coming off a dire two years -- and they won't be shifting gears any time soon.
See story on say goodbye to cheap flights.


It's not your money: Four expense account rules

The quick action taken by the Hewlett-Packard Co. board to oust Chief Executive Mark Hurd because of expense-report recklessness should be a clarion call to employees at every level: expense accounts are not to be taken lightly.
See story on it's not your money: four expense account rules.

NYT: Morning Business News. Judge Revokes Approval of Modified Sugar Beets August 14th., 2010


BUSINESS:

Judge Revokes Approval of Modified Sugar Beets
 

By ANDREW POLLACK
A federal district judge said the Agriculture Department needed to better assess the environmental consequences.


F.D.A. Approves 5-Day Emergency Contraceptive
 

By GARDINER HARRIS
The pill, called ella, which will be available by prescription only, is more effective than Plan B, the morning-after pill now available over the counter.


Pharmacists Take Larger Role on Health Team
 

By REED ABELSON and NATASHA SINGER
Drugstore pharmacists are taking on more responsibility for monitoring patients with long-term illnesses.

More Business News