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Nov 7, 2016

The Economist Selected Articles November 7, 2016: The FBI and The Election| Bellwether Countries | Flying Cars

www.economist.com



The FBI and the election: A democratic scandal
James Comey, head of the FBI, has said that a second probe into Hillary Clinton’s e-mail arrangements is over. The verdict was the same as the first: her use of a private internet server instead of an official e-mail was “careless” but did not warrant an indictment. The furore Mr Comey created was unwarranted, avoidable, and extremely damaging for Mrs Clinton. His mess will not be cleaned up easily, writes our American politics correspondent
Bellwether counties: So goes the nation?
Over the past century, Vigo County in Indiana has voted for the eventual president every time except 1952. That makes it a bellwether county: an apparently prescient indicator of national sentiment. It is not alone: six other counties have got it right in the past dozen elections. Such streaks are bound to happen in some of America’s 3,000 counties. They are also bound to end sooner or later. Indeed, Vigo is odds-on to vote for Donald Trump

 Thousands of people have taken to the streets of Hong Kong to protest against China’s decision to block two pro-independence lawmakers from taking up their posts in the territory’s Legislative Council. The intervention by China’s parliament, which pre-empted a constitutional ruling on the case in Hong Kong, is the first of its kind since Britain handed back Hong Kong in 1997. Many now worry about Hong Kong’s judicial independence

 
 
 
Flying cars: Maybe for real this time
Uber says it aims to launch a network of flying cars within a decade. The helicopter-like vehicles could turn a two-hour road trip into a 15-minute flight that would cost less than an Uber ride does now. Regulators will need to be happy with a system that prevents the things from crashing into each other. It’s ambitious work. But if it gets off the ground, the impact on life could be transformative, writes our business travel correspondent