Translate

Search This Blog

Search Tool




Asian Markets at Close Report

European Markets at Close Report

Sep 2, 2016

NYT First Draft - September 2, 2016: Leaked Script Shows What Advisers Want Trump to Say at Black Church, by Yamiche Alcindor

Friday, September 2, 2016


The New York Times

The New York Times

Bishop Wayne T. Jackson at Great Faith Ministries in Detroit on Tuesday. Bishop Jackson is scheduled to interview Donald J. Trump on Saturday.
Bishop Wayne T. Jackson at Great Faith Ministries in Detroit on Tuesday. Bishop Jackson is scheduled to interview Donald J. Trump on Saturday. Sean Proctor for The New York Times
Leaked Script Shows What Advisers Want Trump to Say at Black Church
By YAMICHE ALCINDOR

Donald J. Trump’s visit to a black church here on Saturday will be a major moment for a candidate with a history of offending the sensibilities of black Americans.
His team is leaving nothing to chance.
Instead of speaking to the congregation at Great Faith Ministries International, Mr. Trump will be interviewed by its pastor in a session that would be closed to the public and the news media, with questions submitted in advance. And instead of letting Mr. Trump be his freewheeling self, his campaign has prepared lengthy answers for the submitted questions, consulting black Republicans to make sure he says the right things.
An eight-page draft script obtained by The New York Times shows 12 questions that Bishop Wayne T. Jackson, the pastor, intends to ask Mr. Trump during the taped question-and-answer session, as well as the responses Mr. Trump is being advised to give.
The proposed answers were devised by aides working for the Trump campaign and the Republican National Committee, according to an official who has been involved in the planning but declined to be identified while speaking about confidential strategy. 
The document includes the exact wording of answers the aides are proposing for Mr. Trump to give to questions about police killings, racial tension and the perception among many black voters that he and the Republican Party are racist, among other topics.
The official said the answers could change based on feedback from the black Republicans they are consulting with.
After this article was published online Thursday night, Jason Miller, the senior communications adviser for the Trump campaign, said that Mr. Trump’s plans had changed and that he would address the congregation for five to 10 minutes after the interview. Mr. Trump will then visit neighborhoods with Ben Carson, a onetime campaign rival, who supports Mr. Trump and grew up in Detroit.
It is not uncommon for a candidate to request interview questions in advance; aides to Hillary Clinton do it from time to time. But it is unusual for a campaign to go so far as to prepare a script for a candidate’s own responses, and highlights the sensitivity of Mr. Trump’s first appearance at a black church. A series of slights, including his questioning of President Obama’s birth certificate, has not endeared him to black voters.
The interview will air about a week later on the Impact Network, Bishop Jackson’s Christian cable TV channel. The official said several Trump aides would work with the network to edit the taped interview so that the final version reflected the campaign’s wishes.
The arrangements had angered several black Republicans, who urged Mr. Trump, widely seen as distant from the black community, to speak for at least 10 minutes at the service, the official involved in the planning said. The official added that the campaign had been uncomfortable with Mr. Trump’s speaking before the congregation and had insisted on a private interview

  A protest in San Francisco last October against proposed changes in the sanctuary city policy.
Jim Wilson/The New York Times
By JULIA PRESTON
Where Donald J. Trump sees oases for criminals, some local law enforcers see policies that make their jurisdictions safer by encouraging undocumented immigrants to report crimes.
Donald J. Trump in Phoenix on Wednesday. Hopes that he was softening his immigration policy faded after his fiery speech.
Travis Dove for The New York Times
By ALAN RAPPEPORT
Some of Mr. Trump’s top Hispanic Republican supporters denounced his reversal after signaling a more conciliatory approach to illegal immigrants less than two weeks ago.


Caitlin O’Hara for The New York Times
By RON NIXON
Fences along the frontier have only helped push smugglers underground, and experts say it may be years before the technology exists to reliably detect the tunnels.
Protesters outside the Phoenix Convention Center on Wednesday as Donald J. Trump gave a speech inside on immigration.
Caitlin O’Hara for The New York Times
By FERNANDA SANTOS
A groundskeeper who came to the U.S. two decades ago stood outside the Phoenix hall where the candidate spoke and shared some thoughts of his own.

By ERIC LICHTBLAU
A top aide to Hillary Clinton agreed to try to obtain a diplomatic passport for an adviser to Bill Clinton in 2009, according to newly released emails.

Donald J. Trump at a campaign event in Cincinnati.
Excerpts From a Draft Script for Donald Trump’s Q&A With a Black Church’s Pastor
Given the importance of Mr. Trump’s visit to a black church, his campaign went so far as to script his answers to questions from the church’s pastor, which were submitted in advance. A draft of the script was obtained by The New York Times.

  Hillary Clinton spoke to guests on the tarmac at Cincinnati Municipal Lunken Airport before speaking at the American Legion National Convention in Cincinnati on Wednesday.
Sam Hodgson for The New York Times
By THOMAS KAPLAN
Amid an uproar over the steep rise in the cost of EpiPens, Mrs. Clinton said she would create a team of federal officials to protect consumers by monitoring increases in price.
Hillary Clinton spoke to guests on the tarmac at Cincinnati Municipal Lunken Airport before speaking at the American Legion National Convention in Cincinnati on Wednesday.
Sam Hodgson for The New York Times
By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE
August was Mrs. Clinton’s most successful fund-raising month so far, and though much of the contributions were earmarked for Democratic Party organizations, the haul lays the groundwork for a substantial investment in swing states before the election.

 ADVERTISEMENT