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Sep 13, 2016

Bits | The Business of Technology: The iPhone 7 Verdict Is In - September 13, 2016

Tuesday, September 13, 2016


The New York Times
The New York Times
The new Apple wireless headphones, called AirPods, will cost $160.
The new Apple wireless headphones, called AirPods, will cost $160. Marcio Jose Sanchez/Associated Press
Daily Report
Apple’s new phone may be the same size, but it is shrinking down lots of unexpected things. How far you are from your music, for example, or the time between you and your apps. Additionally, the width of your wallet can shrink quite a bit from the removal of money.
Brian X. Chen reviews Apple’s 10th generation iPhone in Tuesday’s New York Times. The phone made its premiere to much ballyhoo last week, and goes on sale Friday.
Like its predecessor, the iPhone 7 will cost about $650. The most talked-about accessory is a pair of wireless headphones that will cost $160 more. Not cheap, in other words, to buy the full experience.
An editor told Brian the little wireless tubes coming out of the buds looked like he had tiny cigarettes in his ears (to me, they are more like drain pipes.) But the sound, Brian says, is quite good, and the engineering is clever.
I borrowed them and realized something else: It’s a very different feeling to listen to music from earbuds without wires leading back to the phone. It’s more intimate than using either standard earbuds or wireless headphones, a direct and full relationship to your music.
Immediacy does seem to be a design goal. The faster processor means getting the camera on or moving among apps is closer to instantaneous. The battery lasts longer, too, so there is less time away from the phone while it is charging.
That may not seem like a lot of time saving, but it adds up, maybe even creating enough space to fill by yet more software. And, as Natasha Singer reports, more is certainly on the way: Apple has also released free software that teaches schoolchildren how to write programs.
Free, that is, to any child or school that buys an Apple iPad.
-- Quentin Hardy
 
Related
Tech Fix
Philip Schiller, Apple’s senior vice president for marketing, at the unveiling of the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus last week in San Francisco.
IPhone 7 Review: Though Not Perfect, New iPhones Keep Apple’s Promises
By BRIAN X. CHEN
Although they lack a headphone jack, the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus are fast, their cameras take superb photos and the batteries last longer.
More From The Times
A self-driving car at Ford’s campus in Dearborn, Mich. It uses radar and lidar, a kind of radar using laser beams, to identify obstacles.
Ford’s Driverless Car Plan: Embrace Tech and Go Slow
By NEAL E. BOUDETTE
The automaker detailed its use of laser-based technology and distanced itself from companies like Tesla, which has taken a different approach to driverless cars.
The rockets, named New Glenn after John Glenn, the first American to orbit the Earth, are almost as large as the Saturn V rocket that NASA used from 1966 to 1973.
Meet New Glenn, the Blue Origin Rocket That May Someday Take You to Space
By DANIEL VICTOR
“Our vision is millions of people living and working in space, and New Glenn is a very important step,” said Jeffrey P. Bezos, the billionaire founder of Amazon and Blue Origin.
Renesas Electronics’ Naka plant north of Tokyo in June 2011, when it was recovering from a devastating earthquake months earlier.
Once Ailing, Renesas of Japan Buys the U.S. Chip Maker Intersil
By JONATHAN SOBLE
As the microchip industry consolidates, the Japanese company has emerged from years of restructuring as a leaner, cash-rich acquirer.
Jason Daniels, an agent with the United States Border Patrol, instructing Fernanda Santos last week during a virtual reality exercise in Tucson.
The Time I Went on Border Patrol in a Virtual Reality World
By FERNANDA SANTOS
The United States Border Patrol is using computer simulators to train its agents in how to defuse potentially violent confrontations.

Personal Technology
Tech Tip
Move Your Address Book From Outlook to Google
By J. D. BIERSDORFER
You can use the export command in Microsoft Outlook to start transferring your contacts to a different mail program.