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Aug 15, 2016

NYT Today's Headlines - August 15, 2016: Secret Ledger in Ukraine Lists Cash for Donald Trump's Campaign Chief

The New York Times

Today's Headlines

Monday, August 15, 2016


Top News
Hand-written ledgers show $12.7 million in cash payments designated for Mr. Manafort from the pro-Russian political party of Viktor F. Yanukovych. Mr. Manafort did not receive
Secret Ledger in Ukraine Lists Cash for Donald Trump's Campaign Chief

By ANDREW E. KRAMER, MIKE McINTIRE and BARRY MEIER

An examination of the activities of Paul Manafort shows how he benefited from powerful interests that are now under scrutiny.
. How Paul Manafort Wielded Power in Ukraine
Carlos Raphael, right, and his crew in July, mining for gold at the Cuatro Muertos, or Four Dead Men, an illegal mine near Las Claritas, Venezuela, that is 15 stories deep.
Hard Times in Venezuela Breed Malaria as Desperate Flock to Mines

By NICHOLAS CASEY

Many turn to panning for black-market gold in the watery pits of mines, where mosquitoes infect them. Once they return home to recover, the disease spreads.
Usain Bolt of Jamaica, right, at the finish line of the 100-meter dash at the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.
Usain Bolt Is Still the World's Fastest Man

By JERÉ LONGMAN

Bolt became the first runner to win the 100 meters at three straight Olympics. The American Justin Gatlin was second.
Editors' Picks
The Refettorio Gastromotiva, a dining hall for homeless people that the Italian chef Massimo Bottura helped open in the downtrodden Lapa neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro.

WORLD

Celebrity Chefs Turn Wasted Olympics Food Into Meals for Homeless

By ANDREW JACOBS

With donated ingredients and some of the world's top chefs, Refettorio Gastromotiva has become a feel-good counterpoint to the commercialization of the Games.

OPINION | OP-ED CONTRIBUTORS

End the First-Use Policy for Nuclear Weapons

By JAMES E. CARTWRIGHT and BRUCE G. BLAIR

The United States has a policy allowing the first use of nuclear weapons. Abolishing it will save money and make the world safer.

Today's Videos
A car was set on fire when a crowd gathered after the fatal shooting of a man by the police in Milwaukee on Saturday.
Fires Burn in Milwaukee After Police Fatally Shoot Man
Protesters set a police car and a gas station on fire after a police officer shot and killed a man during a traffic stop late Saturday night.

World
Doctors prepared Yehia, who was born with several congenital heart defects, for surgery at the Wolfson Medical Center on July 31 in Holon, near Tel Aviv.
Unlikely Facebook Friendship Saves Afghan Baby With Heart Defect

By DIAA HADID

Two digital acquaintances, one in Israel and another in Afghanistan, collaborated to save a baby in Pakistan with life-threatening congenital heart problems.
Afghan security personnel prepared for combat with Taliban militants in the Nad Ali district of Helmand on August 10.
Afghanistan Forces Struggle to Hold Firm Against Taliban in South

By MUJIB MASHAL

Elite forces are trying to hold their ground near Lashkar Gah, the capital of Helmand Province and a critical link in the defense of the region.
An image from a video released by Boko Haram that purports to show several of the schoolgirls who were kidnapped from Chibok in 2014.
Boko Haram Video Appears to Show Bodies of Kidnapped Girls

By DIONNE SEARCEY

A masked, camouflaged fighter who appears in video said many of the abducted girls had died in Nigerian military airstrikes.
For more world news, go to NYTimes.com/World »
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U.S.
On Saturday, residents evacuated from Providence Boulevard in Hammond, La., where floodwaters inundated homes.
Thousands Displaced in Storm-Drenched Louisiana

By CAMPBELL ROBERTSON

At least five people were killed and thousands rescued because of weekend flooding. More areas are expected to flood as swollen waters roll south.
Demonstrators surrounding a police vehicle on Sunday as they protested the fatal shooting of Sylville K. Smith by an officer in Milwaukee.
Milwaukee Shaken by Eruption of Violence After Shooting by Police

By KAY NOLAN and NIRAJ CHOKSHI

Hours after a police officer shot and killed a fleeing armed man, angry crowds confronted the police and then went on a violent rampage.
A car burned on Saturday in Milwaukee as a crowd of more than 100 people gathered after the fatal shooting of a man by the police.
Racial Violence in Milwaukee Was Decades in the Making, Residents Say

By JOHN ELIGON

The city now joins other places where police killings highlighted simmering anger over the systemic problems that have so many black people feeling hopeless.
Politics
Hillary Clinton last week at a rally in St. Petersburg, Fla.
Hillary Clinton's Edge in a Donald Trump-Centric Race Has Liberals Wary

By MATT FLEGENHEIMER

A strategy of courting Republicans and focusing closely on Mr. Trump, they say, may impede Mrs. Clinton's ability to claim a policy mandate if elected.
A health insurance fair last year in San Francisco.
Health Insurers Use Process Intended to Curb Rate Increases to Justify Them

By ROBERT PEAR

Bitter conflicts have erupted between insurers and consumers at hearings around the country as companies request double-digit premium increases.
President Obama played golf this month at Farm Neck Golf Club in Oak Bluffs, Mass., during his annual summer vacation to Martha's Vineyard.

WHITE HOUSE LETTER

President Obama's Emotional Spotify Playlist Is a Hit

By GARDINER HARRIS

For the second year in a row, Mr. Obama released his summer vacation music and reading lists, and they're emblematic of his personality and popularity.
For more political news, go to NYTimes.com/Politics »

ELECTION 2016

A New Election Podcast
Listen to news and analysis from our political reporters, Opinion columnists, Upshot analysts and more with The Run-Up, a new podcast from The New York Times covering the final three months of the election. Available on iTunes.

Business
A new reluctance to use credit cards is expected to have lasting effects on nonborrowers and the broader economy.
Why Millennials Are in No Hurry to Take On Debt

By NATHANIEL POPPER

Building a credit history holds less appeal for young Americans who had trouble paying off student loans and saw their families' struggles during the financial crisis.
Michael W. Ferro Jr.'s vision for Tribune Publishing, now known as Tronc, has excited some and befuddled others at the company.
A Tech Mogul's Fight to Keep Control of a Newspaper Empire

By LESLIE PICKER and SYDNEY EMBER

Michael W. Ferro Jr., who made himself chairman of Tribune Publishing and changed its name to Tronc, clashed with other investors over Gannett's takeover bids.
Commentators on the NFL Network. When Twitter streams its first N.F.L. game on Sept. 15, it will get to assess whether live streaming can viably be a linchpin of its future.
With N.F.L. Deal, Twitter Live-Streams Its Ambitions

By MIKE ISAAC

After the social network streams its first N.F.L. game on Sept. 15, it will assess whether live streaming can be a linchpin of its future.
For more business news, go to NYTimes.com/Business »

Technology
Brian Krzanich, Intel's chief executive, is scheduled to speak at the company's Developer Forum in San Francisco this week.

BITS

Intel's New Mission: Find Fresh Uses for Its Famous Paranoia

By QUENTIN HARDY

The world's biggest semiconductor company is scrambling for a place in sensors, wireless networking and autonomous vehicles, as computing spreads to nearly every machine.
A self-service checkout machine at a supermarket on Long Island.
Self-Service Checkouts Can Turn Customers Into Shoplifters, Study Says

By CHRISTOPHER MELE

The study of purchases in countries like Britain and the United States suggested that shoppers may find it easy to justify not scanning merchandise and taking it without paying.
For more technology news, go to NYTimes.com/Technology »

Sports
Ryan Lochte, left, was one of four American swimmers robbed in Rio de Janeiro.
Ryan Lochte and Three Teammates Robbed at Gunpoint

By REBECCA R. RUIZ and VICTOR MATHER

The swimmers' taxi was stopped by men posing as police officers, the U.S. Olympic Committee said, although Lochte had initially denied the incident.
Carli Lloyd, left, during an Olympic match against Serbia. The U.S. coach said she represented a new breed of physical setter - fast enough to chase every ball, big enough to block and hit.
An American Stands on the Shoulders of a Gladiator

By JOHN BRANCH

Carli Lloyd, a setter on the U.S. volleyball team, has always relied on the support of her uncle, who starred as one of the spandex-clad titans on "American Gladiators."
Graphic GRAPHIC: Athletes Who Were Denied Their Olympic Medal Moments Because Others Were Doping

By NICOLE HE, K.K. REBECCA LAI and PAUL MURRAY

When an Olympic medalist is caught doping, any medals he or she has won are usually ordered returned, to be awarded to the next finisher in line.
For more sports news, go to NYTimes.com/Sports »

Arts
How Mark Rylance Became Olivia Onstage

By BEN BRANTLEY

Mr. Rylance's portrayal in "Twelfth Night" is, hands down, our chief theater critic's favorite Shakespeare performance. The actor tells us how he developed the role.
Joey Ramone, left, and Dee Dee Ramone at the Roundhouse in London on July 4, 1976.
Hey Ho, It's Old: England Embraces Punk Rock 40 Years Later

By CHRISTOPHER D. SHEA

Some fans are less than thrilled by an institutional tribute to the summer of 1976, when the Ramones and the Sex Pistols helped punk rock take flight.
Normani Kordei, a member of the girl group Fifth Harmony, has been the target of online racist taunts from the band's own fan base.