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Aug 12, 2016

NYT First Draft Political News - August 12, 2016: In Michigan, Clinton Calls Trump "Enemy of the Little Guy", by Amy Chozick and Alan Rappeport

Friday, August 12, 2016

The New York Times

NYTimes.com/FirstDraft »

The New York Times

Friday, August 12, 2016

Hillary Clinton in Detroit on Thursday.
Hillary Clinton in Detroit on Thursday. Sam Hodgson for The New York Times
In Michigan, Clinton Calls Trump Enemy of ‘the Little Guy’
By AMY CHOZICK AND ALAN RAPPEPORT

In a full-throttled rejection of Donald J. Trump’s economic policies, Hillary Clinton on Thursday accused him of feigning a connection to the working man, while advocating policies that would “work for him and his friends, at the expense of everyone else.”
Seeking to chip away at the perception among working-class white voters that Mr. Trump is the economic populist in the race, Mrs. Clinton said the Republican nominee merely paid “lip service” to being on the side of average Americans. She repeatedly contrasted his personal wealth with her own middle-class upbringing.
Mrs. Clinton referred to the tax cuts for the wealthy and corporations that Mr. Trump presented in a speech in Detroit on Monday, saying he “wants to give trillions in tax breaks to people like himself,” which would lead to broad cuts in spending on education, health care and environmental protection.
Although she has attacked Mr. Trump’s business record for months, her address on Thursday was a detailed point-by-point rebuttal to the economic proposals Mr. Trump unveiled this week.
The nearly back-to-back addresses on the economy put into sharp relief the candidates’ contrasting positions on an issue that has preoccupied voters throughout the lengthy presidential contest, with Mr. Trump seizing on economic dislocation in mixing populist anti-trade positions with traditionally Republican tax cutting, and Mrs. Clinton seeing a strong government hand in creating jobs and driving up wages.
She sharply criticized important elements of Mr. Trump’s tax cut plans and said his plan for business owners included what she called the “Trump loophole,” which would “allow him to pay less than half the current tax rate on income from many of his own companies.”
Mrs. Clinton’s remarks often transcended policy, as she sought to portray Mr. Trump as an out-of-touch businessman who would squash the working class. She talked about her grandfather’s years of labor in a lace mill in Scranton, Pa., and her father’s small drapery-printing business in Chicago.
“This is personal for me,” Mrs. Clinton said. “I am the product of the American middle class.”
But Mr. Trump remains a difficult opponent to critique in traditional ideological terms, and he enjoys some of his strongest support among working-class white voters who believe he cares about people like them.
 
On the Trail
Mr. Trump is the only candidate or running mate with a public schedule. He will hold rallies in Erie and Altoona, Pa.
 
Donald J. Trump at a rally in Sunrise, Fla., on Wednesday.
Scott McIntyre for The New York Times
By MAGGIE HABERMAN AND NICK CORASANITI
The Republican nominee said that he intended to stick with his unorthodox campaign style, even if it meant taking “a very, very nice long vacation” after Nov. 8.
Hillary Clinton in Des Moines on Wednesday. She is scheduled to speak about her economic plans on Thursday near Detroit.
Sam Hodgson for The New York Times
By BINYAMIN APPELBAUM
While their economic platforms are markedly different, both candidates promise to create jobs but have said little about helping people while they are not working.
Signs in English and Spanish, including those saying “Estoy con ella,” or “I’m with her,” at a rally for Hillary Clinton and Senator Tim Kaine in Miami last month.
Scott McIntyre for The New York Times
By MATT FLEGENHEIMER AND AMY CHOZICK
With as many as 1,000 families a month relocating to Florida from Puerto Rico, Democrats aim to register as many coveted new voters as possible.
Donald Trump and Gov. Mike Pence in Detroit on Monday.
Evan Vucci/Associated Press
By ASHLEY PARKER
In addition to being cast as cleaner-up in chief for Donald J. Trump, Mr. Pence and his loyalists are hoping to position him for a post-2016 landscape.
Brandon Miles of Deland, Fla., left, Brandon Partin, of Deland, Fla., center, and Michael Miles, of Deland, Fla., at a rally for Donald J. Trump in Kissimmee, Fla., on Thursday.
At a Donald Trump Rally, a Confederate Flag Goes Up, and Quickly Comes Down
By NICK CORASANITI
A Trump supporter who had hung the flag near the stage was prodded to remove it and did so, unhappily.
Hillary Clinton spoke at Futuramic Tool & Engineering Company near Detroit on Thursday.
Fact-Checking Hillary Clinton’s Economic Speech
By JACKIE CALMES
What Mrs. Clinton got right, and wrong, in her promotion of her economic agenda and attacks on that of her rival, Donald J. Trump.

Evan Vucci/Associated Press
COMMON SENSE
By JAMES B. STEWART
Mr. Trump has not released his tax returns, but tax experts say it is possible and legal that he pays little or nothing in federal income tax.
 
By ADAM PEARCE AND KAREN YOURISH
Republican Senate seats that were considered to be tossups before Donald J. Trump became the Republican nominee may be even more vulnerable now.
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