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Aug 3, 2016

NYT First Draft on Politics - August 3, 2016: Donald Trump Steps Up Criticism of Khans and Republican Leaders, by Alexander Burns

Wednesday, August 3, 2016

The New York Times

The New York Times

Wednesday, August 3, 2016

Donald J. Trump spoke on Tuesday in Ashburn, Va.
Donald J. Trump spoke on Tuesday in Ashburn, Va. Chet Strange for The New York Times
Donald Trump Steps Up Criticism of Khans and Republican Leaders
By ALEXANDER BURNS
Donald J. Trump’s continuing hostility toward the parents of a slain Muslim American soldier, and his attacks on Republican leaders who have rebuked him for it, threaten to shatter his uneasy alliance with the Republican Party at the outset of the general election campaign.
Ignoring the pleas of his advisers and entreaties from party leaders in Washington, Mr. Trump only dug in further on Tuesday. He told a Virginia television station that he had no regrets about his clash with Khizr and Ghazala Khan, the parents of an Army captain killed in Iraq. And in an extraordinarily provocative interview with The Washington Post, Mr. Trump declined to endorse for re-election several Republicans who had criticized him, including the House speaker, Paul D. Ryan of Wisconsin,and Senator John McCain of Arizona, who both face primaries this month.
For days, Mr. Trump’s top advisers and allies have urged him to move on from the feud, which erupted when Mr. Khan criticized him at the Democratic convention, and focus instead on the economy and the national security record of his Democratic opponent, Hillary Clinton. Yet, facing outcry on the left and right, Mr. Trump has insisted to associates that he has been treated unfairly by Mr. Khan, the news media and some Republicans, said people familiar with the campaign’s deliberations who insisted on anonymity to discuss them.
Republicans now say Mr. Trump’s obstinacy in addressing perhaps the gravest crisis of his campaign may spur drastic defections in the party, and Republican lawmakers and strategists have begun to entertain abandoning him en masse.
Mrs. Clinton, who explicitly courted Republicans at last week’s convention, has already picked up a few telling Republican endorsements: Meg Whitman, the Hewlett Packard Enterprise executive who ran for governor of California as a Republican, and Representative Richard Hanna of New York, a moderate Republican. Both denounced Mr. Trump’s treatment of the Khan family.
In Mr. Trump’s five-day confrontation with a military family, Republicans have found the most agonizing test yet of their relationship with a candidate who has flouted political conventions around religion, race, gender and now military service. Republican strategists who once imagined Mr. Trump could be brought under control in a general election all but openly acknowledged this week that that prospect had vanished.
But the party has not yet come close to abandoning Mr. Trump’s candidacy: Most of the lawmakers who have denounced him for fighting with the Khans have not said they will vote against him in the general election.
 
On the Trail
The presidential candidates and their running mates are in swing states, as Mrs. Clinton will campaign in Commerce City, Colo., where she will give a speech on the economy, while Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia will speak on the same subject in Greensboro, N.C. 
Mr. Trump will host two rallies in Florida, one in Daytona Beach and one in Jacksonville, and Gov. Mike Pence of Indiana will be in Colorado, where he will host a town-hall-style event in Denver and a rally in Colorado Springs.
 
Meg Whitman, a Hewlett-Packard executive who ran for governor of California, with her husband, Griffith R. Harsh IV.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images
By JONATHAN MARTIN
The Hewlett Packard Enterprise chief and Republican fund-raiser said Mrs. Clinton had reached out to her, one of the first indications that the Democratic nominee is courting Republican leaders.
Paul D. Ryan of Wisconsin, the House speaker, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland last month.
Doug Mills/The New York Times
By NICK CORASANITI
“I’m not quite there yet,” Mr. Trump said of Mr. Ryan, who, like Mr. McCain, faces a challenge in a Republican primary.
President Barack Obama during a press conference at the White House August 2.
Al Drago/The New York Times
By MICHAEL D. SHEAR AND NICK CORASANITI
During a news conference with the prime minister of Singapore, the president said the Republican nominee was “woefully unprepared to do this job.”
Representative Richard Hanna of New York became the first Republican member of Congress to endorse Hillary Clinton for president.
Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call, via Associated Press
By ALEXANDER BURNS
Representative Richard Hanna of New York became the first Republican member of Congress to endorse Mrs. Clinton, citing Mr. Trump’s attacks on a soldier’s parents.
Donna Brazile, the interim chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee, last week at the party’s convention in Philadelphia.
3 Top D.N.C. Officials Leave as Upheaval After Email Breach Continues
By ALAN RAPPEPORT
The departures came more than a week after leaked emails showed that officials had showed favoritism toward Hillary Clinton.
Hillary Clinton with the billionaire investor Warren Buffett at a campaign event in Omaha on Monday.
Hillary Clinton’s Campaign Raised $63 Million in July, Its Best Mark So Far
By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE
A surge of donations after Mrs. Clinton’s speech at the Democratic convention helped fuel a figure that suggests she will maintain or widen her financial lead over Donald J. Trump.
Hillary Clinton with the billionaire investor Warren Buffett at a campaign event in Omaha on Monday.
Tim Kaine, Straddling Dual Roles, Calls for Congress to Provide Zika Funding
By CARL HULSE
Mr. Kaine, the Virginia senator and vice-presidential candidate, urged the G.O.P. to bring the Senate back into session to deal with the threat, given the outbreak in South Florida.
Donald J. Trump at a rally in Ashburn, Va., on Tuesday.
Chet Strange for The New York Times
By NICK CORASANITI
As the infant’s wailing continued, Mr. Trump’s remarks on the situation shifted from “I love babies” to “I was only kidding, you can get that baby out of here.”
Donald J. Trump at a rally in Ashburn, Va., on Tuesday, speaking about infrastructure as part of his plan to stimulate America’s economy.
Chet Strange for The New York Times
By ALAN RAPPEPORT
The idea offered further evidence that the Republican presidential nominee is prepared to break with the fiscal conservatism that his party has evangelized.
The Upshot
THE 2016 RACE
If Hillary Clinton retains most of her gains from the Democratic convention over the coming weeks, Donald Trump’s chances in the race will start to look fairly bleak.
Why Hillary Clinton’s Polling Bounce Has a Better Chance to Persist
By NATE COHN
A comfortable edge in post-convention surveys suggests her support could fade and she could still maintain a clear lead.
THE 2016 RACE
The crowd at the Republican convention in Cleveland last week.
Donald Trump Seems More the Result of a Shift Among White Men Than the Cause of It
By LYNN VAVRECK
Data suggest that the big electoral move among this group had already started by the 2012 election, predating Mr. Trump.
THE 2016 RACE
Florida Is Most Likely to Be the Election ‘Tipping Point’
By JOSH KATZ
The Upshot forecasting model gives the state a 17 percent chance of being the one that puts the winning candidate over the top. Pennsylvania and Ohio are second and third.
 
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