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Aug 8, 2016

NYT First Draft - August 8, 2016: Trump, Hoping to Change Subject, Heads to Detroit to Talk Economics, by Alan Rappeport

Monday, August 8, 2016

The New York Times


The New York Times

Monday, August 8, 2016

Donald J. Trump at an event in Windham, N.H., on Saturday.
Donald J. Trump at an event in Windham, N.H., on Saturday. Ilana Panich-Linsman for The New York Times
Trump, Hoping to Change Subject, Heads to Detroit to Talk Economics
By ALAN RAPPEPORT
Donald J. Trump will look to move past a week of turmoil on Monday as he heads to Michigan to deliver a policy address on a subject that he considers his strong suit: the economy.
Mr. Trump, who will be joined by his running mate, Gov. Mike Pence of Indiana, will speak at a Detroit Economic Club lunch, and he is expected to lay out plans for how he would revitalize the United States’ economy.
Mr. Trump, who has argued that his background as a real estate developer qualifies him to steer the world’s largest economy, will also highlight how his economic vision differs from that of Hillary Clinton, his Democratic opponent.
The address represents an opportunity for Mr. Trump to change the subject after a week in which he was embroiled in controversy over his critical remarks about the family of a fallen Muslim soldier and several other miscues. As a result, Mr. Trump’s poll numbers have taken a dive, and some Republicans have started to desert him.
But Monday will offer Mr. Trump something of a reset, allowing him to lay out a broader framework of his plans for the economy. Thus far, he has promised to spur economic growth by cutting taxes, closing loopholes that benefit the superrich, penalizing companies that move their operations to other countries and renegotiating trade deals that do not favor American workers.
Many of Mr. Trump’s economic ideas stray from conservative orthodoxy, and last week he signaled that he might move to the left of Mrs. Clinton in some areas, suggesting that he would spend twice as much as she would on infrastructure. However, Mr. Trump also seems to be ready to take cues from Wall Street despite his populist proposals. On Friday, he announced a team of economic advisers that consisted of billionaires, bankers and fund managers.
With Michigan being a crucial state for both parties in November, Mrs. Clinton will try not to let her rival get the last word. The Democratic nominee will be in Detroit on Thursday to deliver an economic speech of her own.
 
On the Trail
Mr. Pence will hold two rallies in Iowa, where he appeared with Mr. Trump on Friday.
Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia has no public events.
 
Perry Barger walked into his home with containers of used needles he had collected from intravenous drug users. A needle exchange program in Scott County, Ind., helped halt a H.I.V. epidemic in the area.
Aaron Borton for The New York Times
By MEGAN TWOHEY
In the face of a growing epidemic, Mr. Pence put aside his moral opposition to giving syringes to drug users to allow a needle exchange program.
Donald J. Trump speaking in Windham, N.H., on Saturday. He is set to attend several high-dollar fund-raisers organized with the Republican National Committee in the coming weeks.
Ilana Panich-Linsman for The New York Times
By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE
Republican patrons are being called on to overcome objections to a candidate they never wanted, and to help defeat a Democrat they want even less.
The new $100 million office of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a think tank in Washington.
Greg Kahn for The New York Times
By ERIC LIPTON AND BROOKE WILLIAMS
Think tanks are seen as independent, but their scholars often push donors’ agendas, amplifying a culture of corporate influence in Washington.
Donald J. Trump in February at Tommy’s Country Ham House, a diner in Greenville, S.C. In an era of gourmet dining and obsession with healthy ingredients, Mr. Trump is a throwback to an earlier, more carefree time in American eating.
Paul Sancya/Associated Press
By ASHLEY PARKER
Mr. Trump, a man of simple culinary tastes, is hoping to become the nation’s fast food president.
Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia, Hillary Clinton’s running mate, at a Clinton rally in Grand Rapids, Mich., on Friday.
Hillary Clinton Begins a Two-Day Swing in Florida
By MATT FLEGENHEIMER
Mrs. Clinton, seeking to keep Donald J. Trump on his heels in a state viewed as central to his electoral fortunes, will start in Pinellas County, a swing county President Obama carried twice.
Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia, Hillary Clinton’s running mate, at a Clinton rally in Grand Rapids, Mich., on Friday.
Tim Kaine Says Hillary Clinton Has Learned From Email ‘Mistake’
By PATRICK HEALY
Mr. Kaine, Mrs. Clinton’s running mate, said on Sunday that their campaign would be “real transparent” and could recover from a trust deficit with voters.
MEDIATOR
Donald J. Trump at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland last month.
Balance, Fairness and a Proudly Provocative Presidential Candidate
By JIM RUTENBERG
As Donald J. Trump continues his stream of outrageous and disquieting statements, journalists must grapple with how to cover him — and if, or when, to abandon the rules of traditional reporting.