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Aug 30, 2016

NYT First Draft - August 30, 2016: Clinton Piles Up Research in Bid to Needele Trump at First Debate, by Patrick Healy and Matt Flegenheimer



Tuesday, August 30, 2016

The New York Times


The New York Times
Donald J. Trump at a Republican presidential debate in March in Detroit.
Donald J. Trump at a Republican presidential debate in March in Detroit. Richard Perry/The New York Times
Clinton Piles Up Research in Bid to Needle Trump at First Debate
By PATRICK HEALY AND MATT FLEGENHEIMER


Hillary Clinton’s advisers are talking to Donald J. Trump’s ghostwriter of “The Art of the Deal,” seeking insights about Mr. Trump’s deepest insecurities as they devise strategies to needle and undermine him in four weeks at the first presidential debate, the most anticipated in a generation.
Her team is also getting advice from psychology experts to help create a personality profile of Mr. Trump to gauge how he may respond to attacks and deal with a woman as his sole adversary on the debate stage.
As Mrs. Clinton pores over this voluminous research with her debate team, Mr. Trump is taking the opposite tack. Though he spent hours with his debate team the last two Sundays, the sessions have been more freewheeling than focused, and he can barely conceal his disdain for laborious and theatrical practice sessions.
“I believe you can prep too much for those things,” Mr. Trump said in an interview last week. “It can be dangerous. You can sound scripted or phony — like you’re trying to be someone you’re not.”
Rarely are debate preparations as illuminating about the candidates as a debate itself, but Mrs. Clinton’s and Mr. Trump’s strikingly different approaches to the Sept. 26 face-off are more revealing about their egos and battlefield instincts than most other moments in the campaign.
Mrs. Clinton, a deeply competitive debater, wants to crush Mr. Trump on live television, but not with an avalanche of policy details; she is searching for ways to bait him into making blunders. Mr. Trump, a supremely self-confident communicator, wants viewers to see him as a truth-telling political outsider and trusts that he can box in Mrs. Clinton on her ethics and honesty.
He has been especially resistant to his advisers’ suggestions that he take part in mock debates with a Clinton stand-in. 
 Mr. Trump, in the interview, said he saw little use in standing at lecterns and pretending to debate his opponent.
“I know who I am, and it got me here,” Mr. Trump said.
Mr. Trump’s certitude — “I know how to handle Hillary,” he said — reflects his belief that the debates will be won or lost not on policy points and mastery of details, which are Mrs. Clinton’s strengths, but on the authenticity, boldness and leadership that the nominees demonstrate onstage.


On the Trail
Mr. Trump will hold a rally in Washington State, and Gov. Mike Pence of Indiana will participate in a town-hall-style event in Georgia and a rally in North Carolina.
Mrs. Clinton, who is focusing on debate preparation and fund-raising, has no public events on her schedule. Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia will have two events in Pennsylvania. 

Huma Abedin, a top Hillary Clinton aide, in Charlotte, N.C., last month.
Doug Mills/The New York Times
By AMY CHOZICK AND PATRICK HEALY
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By YAMICHE ALCINDOR
The Republican nominee will appear on Saturday at Great Faith Ministries, where he will be interviewed by Bishop Wayne T. Jackson, president and chief executive of the Impact Network.

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The ads, costing $10 million, will be broadcast in Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Virginia.

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The votes in Florida and Arizona on Tuesday feature unexpectedly close showdowns for incumbents.

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Isaac Brekken for The New York Times
On Washington
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The battle to choose Mr. Reid’s successor is pitting him against Charles G. and David H. Koch, who are trying to flip a Democratic seat and help Republicans seal control of the Senate.
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