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Aug 25, 2016

NYT First Draft - August 25, 2016: Clinton Paint Ominous Portrait of Trump's Links to "Alt-Right" by Matt Flegenheimer

Thursday, August 25, 2016

The New York Times


The New York Times

Thursday, August 25, 2016

Supporters cheered behind flags on Tuesday  as they waited for Donald J. Trump to speak in Austin, Tex.
Supporters cheered behind flags on Tuesday as they waited for Donald J. Trump to speak in Austin, Tex. Damon Winter/The New York Times
Clinton to Paint Ominous Portrait of Trump’s Links to ‘Alt-Right’
By MATT FLEGENHEIMER
Hillary Clinton plans to deliver a major address on Thursday denouncing Donald J. Trump’s embrace of the “alt-right” political philosophy, presenting his choice as an especially ominous turn in a presidential election full of them.
The speech, at a community college in Reno, Nev., will come one week after Mr. Trump named Stephen K. Bannon, the executive chairman of Breitbart News, as his campaign chief. Mr. Bannon has eagerly described the site as “the platform for the alt-right” — a loosely defined and contested term often associated with white nationalist and anti-immigrant sentiment.
Accordingly, one of Mrs. Clinton’s challenges will be explaining the “alt-right” to a national audience that may have little familiarity with it. Her campaign has accused the ideology’s proponents of “embracing extremism and presenting a divisive and dystopian view of America.”
It is the kind of formal address that Mrs. Clinton has often pursued to communicate her general election message. She also set aside specific events to sternly criticize Mr. Trump’s plans for domestic and foreign policy, and took to the Old State Capitol in Springfield, Ill., last month — the site of Abraham Lincoln’s “house divided” speech — to appeal to the country’s better angels.
For his part, Mr. Trump has often appeared to court the alt-right community — sometimes more winkingly than others — and his elevation of Mr. Bannon heartened many who identify with the movement.
Mr. Trump has also spoken often in recent days of his desire to win African-American support, though his remarks, which have come in front of predominantly white audiences, have more than occasionally offended black voters. He has said African-Americans live in neighborhoods resembling “war zones,” struggle to get by on food stamps and constantly face down errant gunfire.
In an interview on CNN on Wednesday evening, Mrs. Clinton said Mr. Trump was “taking a hate movement mainstream.”
In a statement, John D. Podesta, Mrs. Clinton’s campaign chairman, framed Mr. Trump’s candidacy as a critical point for the Republican Party.
“Republicans up and down the ticket are going to have to choose whether they want to be complicit in this lurch toward extremism,” he said, “or stand with the voters who can’t stomach it.”
Mr. Trump’s campaign and Breitbart have also reveled recently in conspiracy theories about Mrs. Clinton, suggesting she is in the throes of a health crisis.
In an appearance on Monday on “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” Mrs. Clinton theatrically asked the host to check her pulse and opened a jar of pickles to demonstrate her strength.
“Make sure I’m alive,” she joked.
On the Trail
Mr. Trump will hold a rally in Manchester, N.H.
Neither candidate’s running mate has a public event on the schedule.

Donald J. Trump on Wednesday after a rally in Tampa, Fla., where he nodded to conspiracy theories about Hillary Clinton’s health.
Damon Winter/The New York Times
By PATRICK HEALY AND ALEXANDER BURNS
After months of flailing attempts, Donald J. Trump has begun to recast his message in more structured terms and wrestle with his temptation to go off script.

Donald J. Trump spoke at a campaign event in Austin, Tex., on Tuesday.
Damon Winter/The New York Times
By RICHARD FAUSSET, ALAN BLINDER AND JOHN ELIGON
“Your schools are no good, you have no jobs, 58 percent of your youth is unemployed — what the hell do you have to lose?” Mr. Trump said of African-Americans at a rally.

Nigel Farage, right, the outgoing Independence Party leader in Britain credited with leading the “Brexit” movement, joined Donald J. Trump at a campaign event in Jackson, Miss., on Wednesday.
Damon Winter/The New York Times
By NICK CORASANITI
Nigel Farage of Britain delivered a rousing speech in support of Mr. Trump, keeping in line with the candidate’s populist message and offering supporters a vision of winning.
Senator Bernie Sanders, left, with his campaign manager, Jeff Weaver, in March. Mr. Weaver was named the head of Mr. Sanders’s new political organization, prompting several staff members to quit.
Sam Hodgson for The New York Times
By ALAN RAPPEPORT AND YAMICHE ALCINDOR
Several core members of Our Revolution, which was publicly announced on Wednesday, had already quit amid concerns over its leadership and financing.

Senator Bernie Sanders, left, with his campaign manager, Jeff Weaver, in March. Mr. Weaver was named the head of Mr. Sanders’s new political organization, prompting several staff members to quit.
Group to Run Bilingual Anti-Trump Ads in Three Swing States
By ALAN RAPPEPORT
People for the American Way will run radio ads through this week in Arizona, Florida and North Carolina to counter any of Donald J. Trump’s appeal to Hispanic voters.

THE 2016 RACE
By JOSH KATZ
The Upshot announces its first 2016 Senate forecast. Democrats are defending only 10 seats while the Republicans have to preserve 24.