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Jul 22, 2016

NYT First Draft on Politics on July 26, 2016: Donald Trump Passes Up the Chance to Escape His Caricature.

Friday, July 22, 2016

The New York Times

NYTimes.com/FirstDraft »

The New York Times

Friday, July 22, 2016

Donald J. Trump vowed on Thursday night to make America “bigger, and better and stronger.”
Donald J. Trump vowed on Thursday night to make America “bigger, and better and stronger.” Damon Winter/The New York Times
Donald Trump Passes Up the Chance to Escape His Caricature
By MICHAEL BARBARO
It was Donald J. Trump’s best chance to escape his own caricature.
He did not.
After 40 years in the public eye, Mr. Trump decided on Thursday night that he was not interested in revealing himself to America with disarming tales of his upbringing, hard-earned lessons from his tumultuous career or the inner struggles masked by his outward pomposity.
In the most consequential speech of his life, delivered 401 days into his improbable run for the White House, Mr. Trump sounded much like the man who had started it with an escalator ride in the lobby of Trump Tower: He conjured up chaos and promised overnight solutions.
It was a speech that might be remembered, ultimately, as much for what it lacked as for what it contained — and for the message those absences seemed to convey: He is content with the angry voters he has won, who thunderously cheered him on here, and indifferent about wooing those he has not.
For those grasping for new signs of humility, generosity and depth, Mr. Trump offered the thinnest of reeds.
Inside the Quicken Loans Arena, a thicket of American flags behind him, he portrayed himself, over and over, as an almost messianic figure prepared to rescue the country from the ills of urban crime, illegal immigration and global terrorism.
“I alone,” he said, “can fix it.”
But Mr. Trump made no real case for his qualifications to lead the world’s largest economy and strongest military. He is, he said, a very successful man who knows how to make it all better.
Campaign speechwriters from both parties were stupefied.
“It’s a lost opportunity,” said Matt Latimer, who wrote speeches for President George W. Bush. He said he had expected Mr. Trump to plumb his personal life and career for the kind of anecdotes that would turn him, in the eyes of his doubters, from a cartoon into a flesh-and-blood human being.
“A little humanity and self-reflection,” Mr. Latimer said, “is usually very powerful in a speech.”
But Mr. Trump, even at 70, seems constitutionally incapable of, or stubbornly averse to, capturing and conveying the complexities of his existence.
Josh Haner/The New York Times
By PATRICK HEALY AND JONATHAN MARTIN
The Republican candidate for president, preparing to accept the nomination, promised aggressive action to protect Americans.
Donald J. Trump delivering his acceptance speech at the Republican National Convention on Thursday.
Josh Haner/The New York Times
By MICHAEL D. SHEAR AND NICK CORASANITI
Many facts in Mr. Trump’s acceptance speech appear to be true, though he sometimes failed to offer the entire story or provide context.
Mr. Trump’s children greeted him as he arrived in Cleveland on Wednesday.
Doug Mills/The New York Times
By ASHLEY PARKER AND MICHAEL BARBARO
Donald J. Trump’s children have assumed an outsize role at the Republican convention, drawing a following of their own.
Ivanka and Melania Trump at a presidential debate in South Carolina.
Eric Thayer for The New York Times
By MAGGIE HABERMAN AND JENNIFER STEINHAUER
The speech was a sharp departure in tone from some of the earlier presentations at the convention, including chants of “lock her up!” about Hillary Clinton.
Ted Cruz addressed his home state’s delegation at a morning breakfast on Thursday in Cleveland, and many of the Texans there remained hostile toward the senator after his convention speech the night before.
Eric Thayer for The New York Times
By JENNIFER STEINHAUER AND MATT FLEGENHEIMER
Mr. Cruz used his speech not to endorse the nominee but to position himself for the future.
Damon Winter/The New York Times
By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE
Mr. Trump completed his unlikely rise to Republican standard-bearer, capping a convention that rarely veered from his theme of restoring American dominance.

Foreign Policy
Donald J. Trump with his family at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland on Wednesday.
Envisioning Donald Trump’s Foreign Policy: The U.S. Steps Back
By DAVID E. SANGER
Mr. Trump’s unconventional proposals on NATO, troop deployment, trade and intervention would most likely reduce engagement with other nations, with potentially risky results.
Donald J. Trump, the Republican presidential nominee, in Cleveland on Wednesday. In an interview, he suggested that he would use a country’s level of military spending as a factor in deciding whether the United States would honor its commitment to defend NATO allies.
Donald Trump’s Remarks Rattle NATO Allies and Stoke Debate on Cost Sharing
By SEWELL CHAN
The candidate’s contention that he might not defend allies that do not pay enough of the costs raised alarms across a continent unsettled by Russia and rising populism.
Donald J. Trump greeting supporters in Cleveland on Wednesday.
Transcript: Donald Trump on NATO, Turkey’s Coup Attempt and the World
By THE NEW YORK TIMES
The Republican presidential nominee discussed his views on foreign policy with David E. Sanger and Maggie Haberman of The New York Times.
 
The Crowd
Facing the camera from left, gay and lesbian members of the District of Columbia’s delegation to the convention: Rachel Hoff, Bob Kabel, Jill Homan, Greg Nelson and José Cunningham
Eric Thayer for The New York Times
By JEREMY W. PETERS
This has not been the best week for the seven out of 19 District of Columbia delegates who are gay or lesbian.
Donald J. Trump, second from left, sat with his family while his son Eric spoke on Wednesday at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.
Stephen Crowley/The New York Times
By NICHOLAS CONFESSORE
At enclaves during the convention in Cleveland, even some of those who had worked against Donald J. Trump’s candidacy were now seeing opportunity.
The Scene
A party sponsored by the College Republican National Committee in Cleveland on Wednesday.
At the Convention: A ’90s Party With a Twist
By SAM PURDY
New York Times correspondents chronicled the colorful, the unusual and the quirky at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland.
100 T-Shirts From the Republican National Convention
By ALICIA PARLAPIANO AND TIM WALLACE
From “Truckers for Trump” to “Vote for Pikachu,” a wide range of views were on display in Cleveland.
Protesters burned an American flag outside the Republican National Convention in Cleveland on Wednesday.
Outside the Hall, Protesters Keep the Peace
By COLIN MOYNIHAN AND MATT FLEGENHEIMER
The mood was closer to festive as Donald J. Trump prepared to speak inside the Quicken Loans Arena.
 
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The Nominee
Senator Ted Cruz’s speech to the Republican National Convention, as seen in downtown Cleveland on Wednesday.
Todd Heisler/The New York Times
By ALAN RAPPEPORT
According to Politico, Mr. Trump also said that if he had been beaten as badly as he beat Gov. John R. Kasich in the primaries, “I wouldn’t support him either.”
Donald J. Trump gave an air-kiss to his running mate, Gov. Mike Pence, after his speech on Wednesday.
Josh Haner/The New York Times
By ALAN RAPPEPORT
Body language experts said that, while a sign of progress, the awkward air-kiss by the Republican ticket showed that the running mates were still getting to know each other.
The Fight
Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia during a news conference in Washington in February 2015.
Tim Kaine May Not Be Liberals’ First Choice as Hillary Clinton’s No. 2
By AMY CHOZICK
Mrs. Clinton’s campaign has kept a tight lid on its search for a vice-presidential candidate and is trying to be agile in deciding when to make the announcement.
Donald J. Trump and his running mate, Gov. Mike Pence, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland on Wednesday.
Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton Deadlocked in New Ohio Poll
By ALAN RAPPEPORT
The survey, from Suffolk University, finds that Mr. Trump and Mrs. Clinton each have the support of 44 percent of likely Ohio voters.
 
Our Other Favorites From The Times
NOTEBOOK
Senator Ted Cruz speaking at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland on July 20.
Ted Cruz Might Be the Only Republican Who Understands Donald Trump
By MARK LEIBOVICH
On the pro-wrestler logic of last night’s speech.
Representative Todd Rokita, center, is among the Indiana Republicans hoping to be chosen as the party’s nominee for governor.
In Convention’s Shadow, Indiana Republicans Vie for Mike Pence’s Old Job
By NICHOLAS FANDOS AND MONICA DAVEY
Intrigue has set in among Indiana’s delegation as officials scrambled for the nomination for governor now that Mr. Pence is the vice-presidential nominee.
WHITE HOUSE MEMO
Audience members greeted President Obama after he spoke at the White House Summit on Global Development on Wednesday.
Obama Faces Growing Expectations on Race and Policing
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS
Activists have questioned why he is not doing more to help. It’s complicated, he tries to explain — a response he acknowledges is accurate and unsatisfying.
Roger Ailes leaving the News Corporation building earlier this week.
Roger Ailes Is Out at Fox News, and Rupert Murdoch Steps In
By JOHN KOBLIN, EMILY STEEL AND JIM RUTENBERG
Mr. Murdoch broke the news to staff members in New York, barely two weeks after Mr. Ailes was named in a sexual harassment suit.