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Jul 27, 2016

NYT First Draft on Politics - July 27, 2016: Democratic Convention: What to Watch for on Day 3, by Michael Shear

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

The New York Times


The New York Times

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

The crowd watching a video about Hillary Clinton on Tuesday, Day 2 of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.
The crowd watching a video about Hillary Clinton on Tuesday, Day 2 of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. Damon Winter/The New York Times
Democratic Convention: What to Watch For on Day 3
By MICHAEL D. SHEAR

With the roll call behind them, Democrats will begin passing the torch on Wednesday to Hillary Clinton from President Obama, who will deliver the keynote speech. Tim Kaine, Mrs. Clinton’s running mate, will get his chance to introduce himself to the nation.
Obama will implore voters to elect Clinton and defend his legacy.
There will most likely never be another stage as big for Barack Obama as the one for his address on Wednesday night, when he will try to bequeath his electoral coalition to the woman he once defeated.
In some ways, Mr. Obama’s appearance here will be his best shot at offering a vigorous defense of his eight-year legacy in the White House. He will make it clear to the millions watching that Mrs. Clinton is the best hope for continuing his policies.
A wistful Joe Biden takes a stage that might have been his own.
Few things are certain in politics, but here is one: Mr. Biden still harbors regrets that he didn’t make one final attempt to win the office he has pined for all his life.
He will most likely never publicly express that regret, of course, and particularly noton Wednesday, when he delivers what is sure to be a powerful endorsement of Mrs. Clinton.
As he takes the stage Wednesday evening, Mr. Biden will no doubt wonder whether Mrs. Clinton’s email scandal and her other weaknesses as a candidate might have given him an opening.
Can Kaine go 2 for 2?
Last week, Mr. Kaine introduced himself at a rally in Miami, delivering the kind of speech that has confounded Republicans in his state for years: a blend of biting comments and “aw shucks” attitude that disarms his adversaries.
For all the news coverage that Mr. Kaine received after his speech last week, the number of people who saw it is minuscule compared with the audience he will face in Philadelphia.
And because of his performance in Miami, which was widely praised, the expectations are sky-high. Now, the question is whether he can perform at the same level again, with the world watching.
 
Damon Winter/The New York Times
By PATRICK HEALY AND JONATHAN MARTIN
The party is looking to move beyond lingering anger and unite behind the first woman to represent a major American political party in a presidential election.
The crowd cheered after Hillary Clinton was formally nominated to be the Democratic Party’s presidential candidate on Tuesday.
Damon Winter/The New York Times
NEWS ANALYSIS
By AMY CHOZICK
Naturally guarded, Mrs. Clinton has seemed a reluctant star of her prime-time production at the Democratic National Convention.
Former President Bill Clinton spoke at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia on Tuesday.
Josh Haner/The New York Times
By PATRICK HEALY
Clinton aides are addressing a potentially thorny problem: Historically, when Mr. Clinton has time on his hands, he can create dangerous distractions for his wife.

The Players
Video Tribute Will Precede Harry Reid’s Final Convention Speech as Senator
By CARL HULSE
Before Mr. Reid takes the stage to lacerate his political opponents, a few people who have worked closely with him will share their thoughts about him via a video.
Supporters of Senator Bernie Sanders outside the Wells Fargo Center after Hillary Clinton was formally nominated on Tuesday.
Angry Bernie Sanders Supporters Protest Hillary Clinton’s Nomination
By MATT FLEGENHEIMER AND COLIN MOYNIHAN
At least 1,000 people demonstrated in Philadelphia as Sanders voters joined supporters of the Black Lives Matter movement for a wide-scale march

Moments
Hillary Clinton and Mayor Muriel E. Bowser, center, in the District of Columbia last month.
Alex Wong/Getty Images
By NICHOLAS FANDOS
Ms. Bowser has helped put making the nation’s capital the 51st state back in the Democratic platform for the first time in 16 years.
Desperate to escape some of the heat, protesters cooled off on Monday when the Philadelphia Fire Department opened fire hydrants near the Wells Fargo Center on the first day of the Democratic National Convention.
Hilary Swift for The New York Times
By NICK CORASANITI
Stormy protests and actual thunderstorms disrupted delegates in Philadelphia, while long lines inside the arena made for hungry attendees.
The Speeches
“I wake up every morning in a house that was built by slaves,” Michelle Obama said on Monday night at the Democratic convention. Her mention of the role played by African-American slaves in building the White House drew backlash from conservative critics.
Yes, Slaves Did Help Build the White House
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS
Michelle Obama, speaking at the Democratic convention, said she lived in a home built by slaves. Some were taken aback, but history supports her.
A WORD WITH
Sarah Silverman and Al Franken onstage.
Sarah Silverman on Bernie or Bust, and the Joke She Didn’t Tell
By DAVE ITZKOFF
Ms. Silverman discusses her spontaneous appeal from the stage to the upset Bernie or Bust faction of Democrats at the party convention — and more.
Meryl Streep spoke at the Democratic National Convention on Tuesday.
Meryl Streep’s New Role: Extolling Hillary Clinton’s ‘Grit’ and ‘Grace’
By MICHAEL BARBARO
Though Ms. Streep is a longtime advocate of women, the Democratic convention was a political coming-out of sorts: deeply personal, openly partisan and nationally televised.
 
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The Opponent
The Pledge of Allegiance and National Anthem preceded the roll call vote in Philadelphia on Tuesday.<br /><br />
Jim Wilson/The New York Times
By JEREMY W. PETERS
From Hillary Clinton and her campaign, a scorching indictment of her Republican opponent as someone who has spared almost no group from insult or injury.
Donald J. Trump held a rally in Winston-Salem, N.C., on Monday.
Todd Heisler/The New York Times
By MAGGIE HABERMAN
The former Ku Klux Klan leader said that the Republican presidential nominee might still support him in his Senate run, despite the Trump campaign’s continued disavowal.