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Jul 7, 2016

Bits | The Business of Technology - July 7, 2016

Thursday, July 7, 2016

The New York Times


The New York Times

Thursday, July 7, 2016

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Stuart Goldenberg
Futurists once had a future. Now, not so much — and that’s a shame.
In his weekly column, technology columnist Farhad Manjoo dissects the state of play for futurists, people who help us peer beyond the present and analyze the technological change coming at us.
What Mr. Manjoo found was discouraging. Where there was once United States government funding and support for futurism, along with powerful forecasting institutions like RAND and SRI, much of that has now fallen away. Futurism also was undone by hucksterism.
That’s a shame because futurism would be useful right now, writes Mr. Manjoo. Today, we are lurching from one crisis to another, often caused by the rapid pace of technological disruption, which is only speeding up. Without a group of professionals who are systematically looking at the future and long-term change, what we end up with is something very risky: a condition Mr. Manjoo dubs “future blindness.”
— Pui-Wing Tam
 
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