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Jul 25, 2016

Bits | The Business of Technology - July 25, 2016: Tech Behemoths Report Their Results

Monday, July 25, 2016

The New York Times
The New York Times

Monday, July 25, 2016

Larry Page, the co-founder of Google and chief executive of Alphabet.
Larry Page, the co-founder of Google and chief executive of Alphabet. Jeff Chiu/Associated Press
Daily Report
This week will offer a glimpse into just how dominant some of the world’s biggest technology companies have become.
AppleFacebookAmazon andAlphabet are all scheduled to post their quarterly earnings this week, giving a report card on their strength and reach in areas like online advertising, e-commerce, mobile gadgets and cloud computing.
For one of these companies, Alphabet, this week’s earnings report will also be an almost-anniversary of sorts. It was nearly a year ago that Google announced that it would be evolving into a holding company structure, with a parent company known as Alphabet and different units — like Google, Nest and Calico — underneath it.
How that transformation has been rippling through what was once Google can be seen through the X division, writes Conor Dougherty. X, formerly Google X, is the company’s “moonshot” factory, which has worked on fantastical projects like a self-driving car (now more reality than fantasy) and stratospheric balloons that can beam the internet. With Alphabet trying to enforce more financial discipline over its various units, X has also been trying to better systematize its research and pay more attention to the bottom line. Read about the results here.
Continue reading the main story
— Pui-Wing Tam
 
Related
Astro Teller, “captain of moonshots” at the X, formerly Google X, research lab in Mountain View, Calif. Projects at the Alphabet-owned division have included efforts to change seawater into fuel and make jet packs.
They Promised Us Jet Packs. They Promised the Bosses Profit.
By CONOR DOUGHERTY
Alphabet’s X research lab is still being asked to imagine the impossible. Only now, under pressure from investors, it has to imagine making money, too.
A Google data center in Council Bluffs, Iowa. The company said it has used artificial intelligence to cut the power use in its data centers 15 percent.
Google Races to Catch Up in Cloud Computing
By QUENTIN HARDY
Analysts say the global cloud-computing business will be worth $67 billion by 2020. Amazon and Microsoft are the current leaders in the industry.

More From The Times
Verizon Announces $4.8 Billion Deal for Yahoo’s Internet Business
By VINDU GOEL
The telecommunications company is buying an entity that has made repeated missteps for years, but the deal gives it an entree into digital content.
Why Yahoo Sold Itself
By KARL RUSSELL
Yahoo, the Internet portal giant, has been struggling for a decade to find a winning strategy against competitors in search, social media and video. Now it is poised to give up, selling itself to Verizon for a small fraction of what it was worth at its height in 2000.
“The faster we can transition to low carbon, maybe, ultimately, to a negative carbon economy, the better,” Elon Musk said.
Elon Musk of Tesla Sticks to Mission Despite Setbacks
By MATT RICHTEL
The billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk is running a private rocket company, doubling down on alternative fuels and pressing on with Tesla after a series of accidents.
Vladimir V. Putin in Moscow last month. Democratic leaders and cyberspecialists wonder if Mr. Putin is meddling in the presidential election.
As Democrats Gather, a Russian Subplot Raises Intrigue
By DAVID E. SANGER AND NICOLE PERLROTH
Researchers have concluded that the Democratic National Committee was breached by two Russian intelligence agencies, and metadata from the released emails suggests that the documents passed through Russian computers.
Viewers of the Democratic National Convention, to be held at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, above, will be able to watch the event on phones and tablets.
Live Videos, Small Screens: Campaigns Hope Voters Like What They See
By MICHAEL D. SHEAR AND NICK CORASANITI
Advances in technology have prompted the campaigns to try to bypass major news networks and speak to voters using Facebook Live, Snapchat and other services.
Private companies like Uber are not required to share financial information.
This Company Will Give a Peek Inside How Much Private Start-Ups Are Worth
By KATIE BENNER
The lack of transparency around private companies has kept the market for start-up stocks small. Equidate, a San Francisco company, hopes to change that.
ADVERTISING
Planned Parenthood of New York’s campaign is intended to help alleviate some of the stigma that surrounds talking about abortion.
Planned Parenthood Turns to Tumblr to Reach a Younger Audience
By MARTHA C. WHITE
In a departure from traditional marketing, the organization’s 100th anniversary ad campaign features personal stories of patients, staff and volunteers.
Dennis Crowley of Foursquare sees a bigger future for location services. “They’re going to be involved in everything we touch.”
Success of Pokémon Helps Put Foursquare Back on the Map
By MIKE ISAAC
A check-in mobile app that led the way in location-based services has benefited from renewed interest.

Insight and Analysis
CULTURAL STUDIES
Hillary Clinton, who was then secretary of state, checking her BlackBerry inside a military plane in 2011. Baby boomers often struggle with modern technology like email.
Hillary, Me and the Digital Divide
By ALESSANDRA STANLEY
As secretary of state, Hillary Clinton struggled to fax, send emails from a computer or find Showtime on her television. Welcome to my world.
 
Personal Technology
A power meter from SRM. The gadgets measure the wattage produced by a rider’s legs and can cost thousands of dollars.
Power Meters Speak Truth to Professional Cyclists, but Can Mislead
By IAN AUSTEN
The computerized gadgets, which measure the energy a rider’s legs are producing in watts, are helpful in training, but on race day, instincts take over.
TECH TIP
Checking the Home Broadband Meter
By J. D. BIERSDORFER
Monthly plans from internet service providers that limit data have become common, but you can keep tabs on your use.