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Jun 15, 2016

Trump Takes Heat From Clinton and Obama as a Poll Hints at Trouble by Maggie Haberman: NYT First Draft on Politics - June 15, 2016.

Wednesday, June 15, 2016


The New York Times


The New York Times

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Hillary Clinton speaking at a campaign event in Pittsburgh on Tuesday.
Hillary Clinton speaking at a campaign event in Pittsburgh on Tuesday. Eric Thayer for The New York Times
Trump Takes Heat From Clinton and Obama as a Poll Hints at Trouble
By MAGGIE HABERMAN

Four significant things happened in the last 24 hours of the 2016 presidential race:
President Obama forcefully denounced Donald J. Trump, the Republican running to succeed him, for playing to the nation’s worst fears in the wake of the deadly mass shooting in Orlando, Fla. Mr. Trump stood by his insinuations that Mr. Obama is sympathetic to terrorists.
Hillary Clinton, defending Mr. Obama, whom she also wants to succeed, painted Mr. Trump as something of an oddball in addition to criticizing his statements about immigration and aggressively profiling Muslims. And yet another national poll, this time from Bloomberg Politics, showed Mrs. Clinton opening a double-digit lead over Mr. Trump.
According to the survey, 63 percent of women said they could never vote for Mr. Trump, a staggeringly high number that presents him with a daunting challenge.
Mr. Trump’s drop in some national polls is most likely connected to self-inflicted wounds, including his comments that the Indiana-born federal judge overseeing a case against Trump University could not be partial because he was “Mexican.” But there is another explanation.
Since shortly after Mr. Trump became the presumptive nominee in early May, the “super PAC” supporting Mrs. Clinton, Priorities USA, has aired ads in battleground states portraying him as disrespectful and even offensive to women.
Those ads have gone unanswered by Mr. Trump’s campaign for a month now, as his team, plagued by internal battles, has struggled with fundamental staff moves, like naming a political director, and with raising money as donors decline to lend their names to fund-raising events.
 
More on Politics
Mrs. Clinton will give another national security address in Hampton, Va.
Mr. Trump will hold a rally in Atlanta, where a developer is trying to persuade a Trump hotel group to take on a proposed tower downtown. 
Mr. Obama will meet at the White House with the Dalai Lama.
 


In his speech on Monday, Donald J. Trump warned that terrorism could wipe out the United States. “There will be nothing, absolutely nothing, left,” he said.
Damon Winter/The New York Times
Political Memo
By PATRICK HEALY AND THOMAS KAPLAN
At a time when other leaders would avoid divisive language and seek unity, Mr. Trump has intensified the power of fear in presidential politics in the aftermath of national crises.
President Obama denounced Donald Trump, the presumed Republican nominee for president, after Tuesday’s meeting with the National Security Council. At right is Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.<br /><br />
Stephen Crowley/The New York Times
By JULIE HIRSCHFELD DAVIS AND MATT FLEGENHEIMER
The president said Mr. Trump’s remarks after the mass shooting in Orlando, Fla., recalled the most shameful periods in American history.
Hillary Clinton attended a campaign event in Pittsburgh on Tuesday.
Eric Thayer for The New York Times
By YAMICHE ALCINDOR AND PATRICK HEALY
Mrs. Clinton and Mr. Sanders spoke privately on Tuesday night as they began exploring what kind of alliance they might build against Donald J. Trump.
Campaign officials for Donald J. Trump, the presumptive Republican nominee for president, have denied credentials to several news organizations, including The Washington Post.
Todd Heisler/The New York Times
Mediator
By JIM RUTENBERG
The presumptive Republican nominee defended his campaign’s ban of several news organizations, saying he was reacting to “dishonest” coverage.
The Democratic National Committee’s opposition research against Donald J. Trump was among the files breached.
D.N.C. Says Russian Hackers Penetrated Its Files, Including Dossier on Donald Trump
By NICK CORASANITI AND DAVID E. SANGER
The hackers targeted the computer systems of the Democratic National Committee in an espionage operation that enabled them to read emails, chats and a trove of opposition research.
Donald J. Trump at a campaign event in Greensboro, N.C.
Donald Trump: I’m a Better Friend to L.G.B.T. Americans
By NICK CORASANITI
Mr. Trump said that Hillary Clinton’s policies on immigration would not help gay Americans.
How Terrorism Suspects Buy Guns — and How They Still Could, Even With a Ban
By ALICIA PARLAPIANO
Senate Democrats are hoping to resurrect legislation to prevent those on the government’s terrorist watch list from buying guns.
 
 
By MATT APUZZO AND ERIC LICHTBLAU
The nightclub shooting in Orlando, Fla., has focused unusual attention on the mundane process of investigating thousands of people accused of terrorist ties.
Sam Hodgson for The New York Times
By SHERYL GAY STOLBERG AND RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA
“The guilt of feeling lucky to be alive is heavy,” one woman said as the inquiry continued into the massacre at the Pulse nightclub.
Angel Colon survived the attack at the Pulse nightclub on Sunday and was treated at the Orlando Regional Medical Center.
Brendan Smialowski/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images
By DENISE GRADY
A rise of mass shootings reveals the challenges facing emergency medicine, and doctors are re-evaluating how best to save lives.
Demetrice Naulings, 34, survived the shooting, but his friend Eddie Justice was killed.
Ángel Franco/The New York Times
By LIZETTE ALVAREZ
Demetrice Naulings, 34, survived the deadly rampage at Pulse nightclub, but his friend Eddie Justice was killed.
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