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Jun 22, 2016

Trump Prepares Counterattack Against Hillary Clinton: NYT First Draft on Politics - June 22, 2016

Wednesday, June 22, 2016


The New York Times

The New York Times

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Hillary Clinton during her speech against Mr. Trump in Columbus, Ohio, on Tuesday.
Hillary Clinton during her speech against Mr. Trump in Columbus, Ohio, on Tuesday. Richard Perry/The New York Times
Trump Prepares Counterattack Against Hillary Clinton
By MAGGIE HABERMAN

Hillary Clinton savaged Donald J. Trump in a speech on Tuesday that focused on his central campaign strength, the economy. On Wednesday, Mr. Trump will offer his response.
Mr. Trump, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, will try to shape an argument against Mrs. Clinton as a fatally flawed candidate, with her own baggage from her tenure at the State Department and the Clinton Foundation.
Mr. Trump’s aides had planned for him to give this speech on June 13, but they delayed it after the deadly shootings in Orlando, Fla., a day earlier. The idea, according to people familiar with early versions of the speech, was to keep the focus on the controversy over her use of a private email server at the State Department, a report about her push to put a donor on a sensitive government board, and money her husband earned from a contract with a for-profit college.
For weeks, Republicans have fretted that these are target-rich opportunities with Mrs. Clinton, the presumptive Democratic nominee, opportunities that Mr. Trump sacrificed as he mired himself in controversies of his own making.
The speech presents Mr. Trump with a chance to keep the spotlight trained on his rival, instead of turning it on himself.
For her part, Mrs. Clinton will meet with House Democrats on Wednesday, as congressional leadership in her party sees a chance to pick up seats if Mr. Trump proves to be a drag on Republican candidates. The meeting highlights contrasts with Mr. Trump’s difficulties in his own party, as Republican congressional leaders have denounced him over the last few weeks.

Donald J. Trump spoke at a campaign event in The Woodlands in Texas, where he was raising money last week.
Eric Thayer for The New York Times
By ALEXANDER BURNS AND MAGGIE HABERMAN
Mr. Trump, in dire financial and organizational straits, suggested he might tap his personal fortune “if need be” to be competitive in November.

A supporter at a Donald J. Trump campaign event at Gilley’s Dallas in Texas last week.
Eric Thayer for The New York Times
By ALAN RAPPEPORT
According to documents submitted to the Federal Election Commission, Mr. Trump paid at least $1.1 million to his businesses and family members in May for expenses.
Hillary Clinton at a campaign event in Columbus, Ohio, on Tuesday.
Richard Perry/The New York Times
By MATT FLEGENHEIMER
Mrs. Clinton belittled Mr. Trump’s record as a businessman and said his economic policies would cause a global recession.
The police responded to a protest in downtown St. Paul during the 2008 Republican National Convention.
Damon Winter/The New York Times
By TRIP GABRIEL
Cleveland and Philadelphia are preparing for the possibility that anger may spill into the streets during the Republican and Democratic conventions.
The 2016 Race
Hillary Clinton delivering a speech in Columbus, Ohio, on Tuesday in which she warned of economic catastrophe in the event of a Trump presidency.
Would a Trump Presidency Mean Economic Disaster? Let’s Take a Look
By NEIL IRWIN
A report from Moody’s Analytics is useful more for its general conclusions about the direction of the economy than its specific predictions.
“If Mr. Trump gets precisely what he’s proposed, then the U.S. economy will suffer meaningfully,” said Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics.
The Moody’s Economic Report That Clinton Is Using to Attack Trump
By NIRAJ CHOKSHI
If all of Donald Trump’s plans were put into effect, the analysts say, the economy would go into a recession by the end of his first term.
Donald J. Trump at a campaign event last week in Greensboro, N.C.
Donald Trump Asks for Evangelicals’ Support and Questions Hillary Clinton’s Faith
By JOHN CORRALES
Many of the socially conservative Christians at the meeting sought assurances about issues like abortion rights and Planned Parenthood.
 
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Photo illustration by Sagmeister & Walsh. Set painters: Colossal Media.
Feature
By MARK LEIBOVICH
Inside the identity crisis roiling the Republican Party.
 
By WILSON ANDREWS, K.K. REBECCA LAI, ADAM PEARCE AND RACHEL SHOREY
What’s next for a campaign with a big fund-raising gap.
Donald J. Trump campaigned in Youngstown, Ohio, in March, a day before he finished second behind Gov. John Kasich in that state’s Republican primary.
Poll Gives Hillary Clinton Good News in Three Crucial States
By ALAN RAPPEPORT
In Florida, Ohio and Pennsylvania, Mrs. Clinton is viewed as being more ready to be president, being smarter and having higher moral standards than Donald J. Trump.