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Jun 8, 2016

Hillary Clinton Clinches a Milestone Nomination , by Patrick Healy and Jonathan Martin: NYT First Draft on Politics - June 8, 2016

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

The New York Times

The New York Times

Wednesday, June 8, 2016


Hillary Clinton during her victory speech in Brooklyn on Tuesday night.
Hillary Clinton during her victory speech in Brooklyn on Tuesday night. Doug Mills/The New York Times
Hillary Clinton Clinches a Milestone Nomination
By PATRICK HEALY AND JONATHAN MARTIN

Hillary Clinton claimed the Democratic presidential nomination on Tuesday night after decisive victories in the California, New Jersey and New Mexico primaries, and quickly appealed to supporters of Bernie Sanders to unite with her against Donald J. Trump.
At a rally in Brooklyn, Mrs. Clinton took the stage as the first woman to win a major party’s nomination, and she pledged to build on the achievements of pioneers like the 19th-century leaders who met at Seneca Falls, N.Y., in 1848 to begin in earnest the fight for women’s rights in America.
Tonight caps an amazing journey — a long, long journey,” Mrs. Clinton said, nearly a century after women won the right to vote across the United States. “We all owe so much to those who came before, and tonight belongs to all of you.”
With six states voting on Tuesday, Mr. Sanders’s political lifeline frayed as his losses mounted, but he refused to bow out. In a speech in Santa Monica, Calif., late Tuesday, Mr. Sanders vowed to continue “our fight for social, economic, racial and environmental justice” through to the Democratic convention in Philadelphia.
Mr. Sanders, who made plans to lay off much of his campaign staff, largely ignored Mrs. Clinton’s triumph, but she lavished praise on him earlier at her Brooklyn rally. She said their “vigorous debate” had been “very good for the Democratic Party and America.”
Mr. Sanders won the North Dakota caucuses and the Montana primary, while Mrs. Clinton also won the South Dakota primary.
President Obama plans to meet with Mr. Sanders at the White House on Thursday at the candidate’s request, an administration spokesman said, adding that Mr. Obama had called both Democratic candidates on Tuesday night to congratulate them on “running inspiring campaigns.”
However, Mr. Sanders appeared reluctant on Tuesday to let go completely after months of political warfare against a Clinton machine that he holds in thinly veiled contempt.
  Hillary Clinton appeared at the “She’s With Us” concert in Los Angeles, after it was reported on Monday that she had exceeded the delegate threshold to become the presumptive Democratic nominee.
Monica Almeida/The New York Times
By AMY CHOZICK
As a politician’s wife, first lady, senator and secretary of state — and as a two-time candidate for president — Hillary Clinton has continually redefined the role of women in American politics.
Paul D. Ryan, the House speaker, outside House of Help City of Hope in Washington on Tuesday.
Jim Lo Scalzo/European Pressphoto Agency
By JENNIFER STEINHAUER, JONATHAN MARTIN AND DAVID M. HERSZENHORN
Mr. Trump’s attack on a Hispanic-American federal judge was “the textbook definition of a racist comment,” the House speaker said.
Jim Wilson/The New York Times
By MICHAEL BARBARO AND YAMICHE ALCINDOR
Despite the insurmountable delegate math, Mr. Sanders took the stage in Southern California and vowed to fight on.
Chang W. Lee/The New York Times
By ALEXANDER BURNS
Mrs. Clinton finished strong on Tuesday, and the battle lines with Mr. Trump for the general election are taking shape.
Donald Trump Says His Remarks on Judge Were ‘Misconstrued’
By ALAN RAPPEPORT
Mr. Trump said he did not think that a Mexican-American judge’s ethnicity created a conflict of interest after his previous comments set off a firestorm.
Senator Bernie Sanders and his wife, Jane, arrived on Tuesday at Los Angeles International Airport.
Bernie Sanders Is Said to Plan Large Layoff From Campaign Staff
By YAMICHE ALCINDOR AND MAGGIE HABERMAN
Mr. Sanders defiantly continues to campaign as Hillary Clinton celebrates winning a majority of the delegates needed for the nomination.
Senator Bernie Sanders in San Francisco on Tuesday. Mr. Sanders was scheduled to speak in Los Angeles later in the day as California voters head to the polls.
Jim Wilson/The New York Times
By ALAN RAPPEPORT
“Presumptive nominee” has no formal definition in politics, but the Sanders campaign is bristling at what it sees as another slight against the Vermont senator.
The crowd waited for Hillary Clinton at her primary night event in Brooklyn on Tuesday.
Doug Mills/The New York Times
By MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM
The Associated Press’s declaration, based on its canvassing of superdelegates, was an unusual way to crown the nation’s first major female presidential nominee.
 
By ALICIA PARLAPIANO AND KAREN YOURISH
How the Clinton-Sanders race differs from the 2008 Clinton-Obama race.
 
By WILSON ANDREWS, KITTY BENNETT AND ALICIA PARLAPIANO
According to The Associated Press, Donald J. Trump and Hillary Clinton have each won enough delegates to claim their party’s nomination for president.
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