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Jun 14, 2016

Donald Trump,Interviews, Seems to Abandon a Pledge to Pivot, by Maggie Haberman: NYT First Draft on Politics - June 14, 2016.

Tuesday, June 14, 2016


The New York Times

NYTimes.com/FirstDraft »

The New York Times

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Donald J. Trump delivering a speech at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, N.H., on Monday.
Donald J. Trump delivering a speech at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, N.H., on Monday. Damon Winter/The New York Times
Donald Trump, in Interviews, Seems to Abandon a Pledge to ‘Pivot’
By MAGGIE HABERMAN

Donald J. Trump has repeatedly promised a “pivot” toward a softer, gentler, more refined version of his candidacy since he emerged as the presumptive Republican nominee. But on Monday, Mr. Trump’s television interviews and speeches made clear that such a pivot would never come.
In four morning interviews, Mr. Trump stood by his ban on Muslim immigrants and said that President Obama was incompetent or knew much more than he was letting on about the type of terrorist threat the country faces. That statement, which Mr. Trump declined to completely clarify in a statement to Bloomberg Politics late in the day, was taken by some as implying that Mr. Obama, whose critics have tried to smear him as a Muslim in disguise, was sympathetic to terrorists.
Later in the day, in a speech in New Hampshire, Mr. Trump expanded on his proposed immigration ban and also called for large-scale surveillance of activities of Muslims in the country.
The speech was a stark contrast to one delivered shortly before by Hillary Clinton, who made no direct mention of Mr. Trump and urged the type of conciliatory notes that the nation struck immediately after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. She made a muscular defense argument, similar to the one Mr. Trump struck, but she proposed a more globalist view of the world than he did.
Mr. Trump is making a bet that a nation terrified of another attack like the one at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla., over the weekend will be open to proposals that are fundamentally different from anything any major-party nominee has recommended in modern history. That bet will not be clear until closer to Election Day.
 
 
By JONATHAN MARTIN AND ALEXANDER BURNS
Mr. Trump appeared to broaden his proposed ban on Muslim immigrants, while Hillary Clinton accused him of damaging efforts to defeat terrorism.
 
By NICK CORASANITI AND MATT FLEGENHEIMER
Mr. Trump, the presumed Republican presidential nominee, spoke about terrorism and national security in New Hampshire after Mrs. Clinton, the presumptive Democratic nominee, also spoke, a day after the deadly shootings in Orlando, Fla.
  People gathered in Orlando for a vigil at the Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts on Monday evening.
Sam Hodgson for The New York Times
By PATRICK HEALY
Unlike previous deadly attacks, there was a diverse reaction across the United States and among politicians about the rampage in Florida.
Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont campaigning in Washington last week. The District of Columbia holds its Democratic primary, the last one of the election season, on Tuesday.
Stephen Crowley/The New York Times
By YAMICHE ALCINDOR AND ALAN RAPPEPORT
With little at stake in the District of Columbia contest on Tuesday, Mr. Sanders is expected to seek assurances that his rival will champion many of his ideas.
By MARK MAZZETTI, ERIC LICHTBLAU AND ALAN BLINDER
Questioning how much the killings were the act of a deeply disturbed man, and how much Omar Mateen was driven by religious or political ideology.

Reporter’s Notebook
Outside the Pulse gay nightclub in Orlando, Fla., on Monday, after a shooting rampage inside left 49 people dead.
‘It’s Sacred.’ A Gay Refuge, Turned Into a War Zone
By MICHAEL BARBARO
To understand the horror of what happened in Orlando, Fla., it helps to understand the role that gay bars play in the history, lives and imagination of gay people.
Law enforcement officials investigated outside the Pulse nightclub, where the police had blown through a wall to allow some hostages to escape on Sunday.
Held Hostage in Orlando: Playing Dead in an Effort to Live
By JACK HEALY AND MARC SANTORA
A man who was trapped for hours in a bathroom with the gunman at the Pulse nightclub described a life-or-death game of deception.
 
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